Jul 02, 2022  
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog

Course Descriptions


 

Environmental Sciences and Sustainability

  
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    ESS 3450 - Sustainable Energy

    Credits: 4
    The objective of Sustainable Energy is to introduce the student to the complex problem of providing sufficient energy without damaging the environment, affecting society and threatening the future of the next generations. Our current path of growing energy needs appears to be unsustainable for the long term. This course will explore the choices we can make now to optimize our future energy supply.
    Prerequisite(s): ESS 1050 .
  
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    ESS 3550 - Environmental Policy

    Credits: 4
    This course will examine environmental issues from a policy perspective. The course will focus on both domestic and global environmental issues with an emphasis on national, state and local policy. We will examine both how values influence environmental policy and how different policy approaches, including regulation, taxing, law and incentives, influence values. The course will focus on what constitutes effective environmental policy and how we achieve it to protect the environment and promote sustainable systems. In addition, students will develop and apply knowledge of environmental analysis in planning and policy making. This examination will be conducted through numerous hands-on exercises focusing on environmental issues in New England. The main course goals are to build student competencies in the political, organizational, scientific and economic drivers shaping past and current environmental policy and policy debates. At the conclusion of this class, each student should be able to place the efforts for clean air and water, sustainable growth, biodiversity protection as well as a sustainable and equitable climate, in institutional, historical, theoretical, and informal contexts.
    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing in the ESS major or consent of the instructor.
  
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    ESS 3600 - Garden Memoirs

    Credits: 4
    This course introduces students to the analysis and production of art and writing inspired by the act of producing one’s food. The course begins with literary analysis and criticism of garden memoirs, then gradually transitions to the planning and artistic representation of our own gardening experiences. By learning from other gardeners and farmers, and planning our own edible oasis, students will develop writing, critical thinking, photography, gardening, group decision-making, and communications skills. 
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
  
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    ESS 4001 - Special Topics

    Credits: 4
    This course will explore advanced subject matter related to the environment.  Topics may include conservation practice, sustainable development, managing common resources, and ethical and political problems faced by environmentalists.  The content of this course will change from semester to semester.  Can be repeated for credit.  
    Prerequisite(s): ESS 1050  and ESS 1060   
  
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    ESS 4010 - Evaluation of Environmental Programs

    Credits: 4
    This course is an introduction to the design and assessment of environmental programs.  Students will be introduced to dynamic systems thinking as a framework to explore environmental problems. The course will take students through the steps of performing needs assessment, designing an intervention and planning an assessment.  This will include applying social science methods to determine evaluation questions, collect and interpret data, report findings and make recommendations.  In this process, students will develop the skills needed to write and present a professional assessment report. Students will use global and regional case studies to develop their skills
    Prerequisite(s): ESS 1050  or ESS 1060   or permission of the instructor.
  
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    ESS 4820 - Senior Seminar/Sustainability Project I

    Credits: 2
    Literature, studio and/or field research to identify, analyze or develop solutions for environmental problems. The project may include more than one student and will be directed by faculty and various project partners. Students are required to elect both ESS 4820 and ESS 4920 .
    Prerequisite(s): Senior Environmental Studies and Sustainability major standing and consent of instructor.
  
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    ESS 4850 - Community Internship

    Credits: 4
    Students work in environmental studies and sustainability internship placements that match the students’ academic program, interests and skills. Internships can be arranged across a wide array of public and private organizations focused on environmental policy, business, research, regulation, enforcement, ethics, education or other areas in the student’s interest. Students must work a minimum number of 100 hours at the placement site and/or doing the work required by the internship. A classroom component is included and designed to provide an opportunity for analysis and discussion of the internship experience with other students and faculty. Internships are overseen by the Program Director.
    Note: Typically taken in the junior year.
  
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    ESS 4900 - Directed Study

    Credits: variable
    This course is for students seeking to perform advanced research under the direction of a faculty member.  Can be repeated for credit.  
  
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    ESS 4920 - Senior Seminar/Sustainability Project II

    Credits: 2
    This is a continuation of ESS 4001. The project may include more than one student and will be directed by faculty and various project partners. A senior project, including a final research report/paper/poster/demonstration, completes the two-semester course.
    Prerequisite(s): ESS 4820 .
  
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    OBR 1000COOP - Cooperative Education Experience

    Credits: 0
    Opportunities are often three, six, or twelve month positions, and vary depending on the major and desired time until graduation. Students may participate in the fall, spring or summer semester. Interested students should contact their career advisor in the O’Brien Center for more information or to discuss opportunities.
    Prerequisite(s): (1) Must have completed a minimum of 60 credit hours to participate, (2) Must have a 2.0 minimum GPA, (3) Must complete a minimum of 30 hours per week for a minimum of 3 months, (4) Must register the cooperative education with the O’Brien Center using Advantage, (5) Student and site supervisor must set learning goals for the cooperative education experience, (6) Student and site supervisor must complete a post co-op reflection of the experience. Student must have approval through the O’Brien Center with oversight from the O’Brien Center Faculty Advisory Board.
    Fulfills: X in LS Core.

Exercise and Sports Science

  
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    EXS 1104 - Introduction to Physical Activity, Fitness, and Wellness

    Credits: 4
    Formerly: SME1104
    This course is a survey of the discipline of health and fitness, including knowledge derived from performing physical activity, studying about physical activity, and professional practice centered in physical activity. It includes an analysis of the importance of health and wellness in daily life, the relationship between physical activity and the discipline of kinesiology, and the general effects of physical activity experiences. The course surveys the general knowledge base of the Health Science discipline as reflected in the major sub disciplines and reviews selected concepts in each, showing how they contribute to our understanding of the nature and importance of physical activity. The students will learn about the fitness components of wellness; flexibility, cardiorespiratory fitness, muscular strength and endurance, body composition, nutrition, weight management, and cancer. Fitness and other positive life style habits that lead to better health, improved quality of life, and total well-being will be discussed. Students will be responsible for developing a self-paced fitness program that will be followed for the duration of the semester. In addition, the course introduces students to the general and specific characteristics of the health and wellness professions.
    Fulfills: STEM requirement in LS Core.
  
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    EXS 1200 - Acute & Emergency Care

    Credits: 4
    Formerly: SME1200
    This course is required for all Sports Medicine & Athletic Training Majors. Acute and Emergency Care will provide the student with the necessary knowledge and life skills that will be utilized in accident recognition, referral and management. Through clinical, practical and evidence based scenarios students will acquire the necessary skills to aid in sustaining the quality of life and minimize the consequences of injury or sudden illness in emergency situations. All students will have the opportunity to become certified through the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons in CPR/AED for the healthcare provider.
  
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    EXS 1300 - Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries

    Credits: 4
    Formerly: SME1304
    The course is designed to acquaint the student with the field of sports medicine by investigating its relationship with orthopedic medicine, nutrition and human physiological processes. The role of sports medicine in society, the role of the athletic trainer in sport, nutrition and the athlete, drug use in sports, and modalities used in the rehabilitation of sports injuries will be studied. There will be a concentration on joint injuries with respect to their prevention and care. The mechanics of injury, emergency care, rehabilitation and taping techniques will be covered.
    Prerequisite(s): HSC 1122 , EXS 1200 .
  
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    EXS 2250 - Research Methods

    Credits: 4
    Formerly: SME2250
    This course introduces the student to current research in athletic training and sports medicine. The student learns about the research process, reads, comprehends and appreciates journal articles and begins writing a research proposal on a topic related to the sports medicine field. Specific attention is directed toward formal written communication using prescribed format.
  
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    EXS 2345 - Strength and Conditioning I

    Credits: 4
    Formerly: SME2345
    This course is a designed as an introduction to the principles of strength and conditioning with an emphasis on applications for improving health and performance in the athlete and non-athlete population. General content areas include concepts and applications of the exercise sciences, nutritional factors, psychology of athletic performance, physiological adaptation of aerobic and anaerobic exercise, hormonal responses, age and gender differences, performance enhancing substance. Lab will focus on an introduction to exercise technique, testing and evaluation, and program design in the strength and conditioning field. This course prepares students to sit for the Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist exam offered by the National Strength and Conditioning Association.
    Prerequisite(s): HSC 1122 HSC 1123 , EXS 1300 .
  
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    EXS 3307 - Therapeutic Exercise with Integrated Lab

    Credits: 4
    Formerly: SME3307
    This course is designed to offer Athletic Training and Sports Medicine students a study of the principles and objectives of therapeutic exercise in the rehabilitation of athletic injuries. The course will examine different forms of exercise, resistance and motion and the proper application of each in order to stabilize, modify or reverse the process responsible for disability when the nature of the underlying cause is identifiable.
    Prerequisite(s): HSC 1122 HSC 1123 , EXS 1300 .
  
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    EXS 3308 - Biomechanics with Integrated Lab

    Credits: 4
    Formerly: SME3308
    The scientific factors affecting human movement are studied. Basic tissue, (bone, cartilage, ligament, tendon) influences are emphasized. Psychological and neurological control mechanisms are examined. Normal movement patterns are reviewed with emphasis on gait, fitness activity and performance analysis. Pathological implications are integrated into the course as the materiel progresses regionally from one area of the body to another. Modern techniques that quantify human movement and movement patterns are investigated. Current topics in biomechanics research and the design of such projects are made real by abstracting of grouped articles. Handouts are used in addition to course texts. In lab teams will be established to achieve common goals. Existing video analysis systems will be used to both study human motion and to create a database of human motion.
    Prerequisite(s): HSC 1122  HSC 1123 , PHY 2201 .
  
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    EXS 3309 - Therapeutic Modalities with Integrated Lab

    Credits: 4
    Formerly: SME3309
    This course is designed to offer Athletic Training and Sports Medicine students the opportunity to comprehend the principles of physical agents used in the treatment of sports injuries. The various theories of therapeutic modalities, their application to the healing process and their physiological effects on the patient will be examined as well as their indications and contraindications.
    Prerequisite(s): HSC 1122 HSC 1123 , EXS 1300 .
  
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    EXS 3311 - Exercise Physiology with Integrated Lab

    Credits: 4
    Formerly: SME3311
    A detailed examination of cardiovascular, respiratory and metabolic physiology, responses to acute exercise, and exercise training adaptations. Laboratory will emphasize exercise testing procedures and techniques as well as research principles.
    Prerequisite(s): HSC 1122 HSC 1123 .
  
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    EXS 3347 - Exercise Testing Techniques and Prescription

    Credits: 4
    Formerly: SME3347
    The course will examine the principles of exercise testing and prescription as they apply to fitness and athletic performance. The course is designed to provide the student with a basic understanding of normal and abnormal exercise responses in a variety of populations. The course will cover topics in the following areas, energy production, nutrition, body composition, periodization, and fitness testing as related to strength and conditioning.
  
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    EXS 4080 - Kinesiology II/Pathomechanics

    Credits: 4
    The purpose of this course is to be a progression from Kinesiology I Biomechanics. The course will provide a greater depth of investigation into the normal biomechanics of the axial skeleton, an introduction to the central nervous/motor control system and pathomechanics of both axial and appendicular regions. Normal movement patterns across all aspects of mobility will be reviewed or introduced as a baseline for critical inquiry into their pathomechanical correlates. The course will provide students considering a graduate education in any aspect of human movement an opportunity to create a movement analysis final digital project highlighting their learning acquisition which can accompany their graduate application and/or be used as a stepping stone into further directed study/research.
    Prerequisite(s): EXS 3308  
  
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    EXS 4348 - Exercise Program Design

    Credits: 4
    Formerly: SME4348
    This course is intended to take the skills and principles acquired in EXS 3347  and to integrate them into the development of specific strength and conditioning programs. These programs may aid in injury prevention, performance enhancement, and overall general fitness. The development of these programs may be achieved through periodized manipulation of acute and chronic training variables.
    Prerequisite(s): EXS 2345 EXS 3311  

Visual and Performing Arts

  
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    ART 1210 - Creative Drawing I

    Credits: 4


    Creative Drawing I is an introductory-level studio course designed to teach students fundamental principles of the drawing medium, as well as the role of drawing in the generation and communication of ideas. This course provides an in-depth investigation of the fundamentals of drawing including line, tone, gesture, mark-making, space, depth, perspective, and additive/subtractive processes, as well as principles of language through visual organization and representation. In addition to these fundamental skills, the class will also explore drawing’s connection to contemporary practices in art and design.

     
    Fulfills: AL in LS core.

  
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    ART 1270 - Painting I: Color and Expression

    Credits: 4
    Painting I: Color and Expression is an introductory level studio course focused on the medium of painting as a two-dimensional media. Through professor-guided exercises, multi-week projects, lectures, and demonstrations, students explore mark making, gesture, tone, vibrancy, and the unique qualities of working in a wet medium. In addition to introducing students to the principles of working in the medium, this course also utilizes painting as an opportunity for in-depth investigation into color theory and spectrums. A range of painting techniques, movements, and genres are explored through the lens of the painting medium, including realism, impressionism, expressionism, and abstraction.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core.
  
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    ART 1600 - Inside Art: A Global Perspective

    Credits: 4
    Field trips are integral to the course where the art museums and galleries become the classroom. As a general introduction to the history of art, “Inside Art” encourages an understanding of purposes and techniques, and emphasizes the relationship of an art work’s form to its meaning. For every gallery or museum visit (approximately five) a 2-3 pp. paper is required as a record of the student’s experience. The Addison Gallery of American Art in Andover, the Currier Museum of Art in Manchester (NH), the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, the DeCordova Art Museum and Sculpture Park in Lincoln, and the McCoy Gallery, The Rogers Center, are among the potential sites. “Inside Art” is designed for non-majors who are interested in a general introduction to world art (from prehistoric Europe to Egypt, China, ancient Greece and Rome, Oceania, Africa, modern Europe and the Americas) from an art historical perspective.
    Fulfills: AL and X in LS Core.
  
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    ART 1610 - Art & Material Culture I: Prehistory to the Renaissance

    Credits: 4
    An examination of selected works of art and architecture and the historical and cultural contexts appropriate to them, from the birth of image-making to the high culture of the late Middle Ages.
    Fulfills: AL or H in LS Core.
  
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    ART 1620 - Art & Material Culture II: The Renaissance to the Present

    Credits: 4
    Art History II is anchored in the culture and traditions of Western Europe and America. Beginning in Italy during the early modern period, this course provides for an understanding of: individual artists and their works, studied within their historical and art historical contexts; the demands placed upon art-marking by patrons and society; and the changing role of the artist’s place in society. 
    Fulfills: AL or H in LS Core.
  
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    ART 1670 - American Art I

    Credits: 4


    This art history course focuses on the formative history, movements, and aesthetics born out of the United States of America. Leading up to its founding and to the late 1800’s, American Art I introduces students to a range of uniquely American artists, innovations, genres, and institutions. Through professor-led lectures, readings, weekly assignments, field trips, film screenings, and discussions, students will gain an in-depth understanding of the early formation and qualities of the american art movement. 

     
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core.

  
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    ART 1680 - American Art II

    Credits: 4


    This art history course focuses on the United State’s transition to, and current status as, one of the world’s most influential artistic cultures. From the late 1800’s to the present, American Art II examines the people, events, movements, and innovations that led to the United States becoming a world leader in the arts. The course also addresses the intrinsic connections between art, politics, sociology, technology, and economics. 

     
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core.

  
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    ART 1710 - Foundations of Making: Process and Creativity

    Credits: 4
    This course is an introductory-level studio course designed to introduce students to the field of Visual Arts. Through studio-based assignments, lectures, and exercises, this course provides an in-depth investigation of the fundamentals of an artistic practice including image-making, visual storytelling, symbolism, metaphor, generative processes, creativity, analysis and critique, and metaphorical thinking. Students will touch on a range of mediums and media to explore these concepts. Special consideration is given to a studio arts practice through its relationship to art history, culture, technology, and personal expression.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core.
  
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    ART 2150 - Comics and the Art of the Graphic Novel

    Credits: 4
    This studio art course focuses on the unique history, theories, and aesthetics of the comic and graphic novel medium. The comics and graphic novel genre embodies a unique form of artistic expression and is supported by a distinct history, culture, and societal importance, and serve as a rich and complex form of storytelling. Through instructor directed research, lectures, readings, and studio-based assignments, students will attain a better understanding of the history, theories, archetypes, sociological contexts, and techniques of the comic and graphic novel artistic medium. Students will engage the content of the course through academic written responses, critique, and the act of making. 
  
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    ART 2155 - Character Design

    Credits: 4
    This studio art course provides an in-depth investigation of the fundamental elements, unique history, theories, and aesthetics of the field of character design. From Frankenstein to Star Wars to the Keebler Elves, character design plays a critical role in literature, illustration, animation, film/video production, graphic novels, cartooning, and product design and advertising. It is a unique and complex area of visual storytelling, which can greatly influence the success or failure of a project. Through instructor directed research, lectures, readings, and studio-based assignments, students will attain a better understanding of the history, theories, archetypes, processes, and techniques of the field of character design.
  
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    ART 2210 - Creative Drawing II

    Credits: 4


    Creative Drawing II is an intermediate-level studio art course designed to expand and refine the students’ pre existing drawing skills, and to create more personalized, ambitious, and well-crafted works of art. Building on the techniques and concepts introduced in Creative Drawing I, Creative Drawing II further develops the student’s abilities in observational drawing, perspective, the figure, gesture, mark-making, space, atmosphere, composition, abstraction, and communication. Through a variety of multi-week assignments, professor-led in-class exercises, field trips, critiques, and lectures, students will explore and refine their own unique voice, style, and personal statements in the artworks they create. Various approaches to drawing are explored, with specific exercises dedicated to the human form and figure. In addition to the refinement of craft within the medium, special attention will be paid to the exploration of the theoretical language of drawing.

     
    Prerequisite(s): ART 1210  or permission of the instructor.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core.

  
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    ART 2220 - Illustration

    Credits: 4
    This studio art course is dedicated to understanding the field of illustration as a unique form of visual art. Through a variety of studio assignments that call upon elements of both design and traditional image making, students will investigate illustration-based concepts such as character design, book illustration, and cartooning. Through professor-led lectures, discussions, and critiques, students will gain a better understanding of how illustration has influenced storytelling, film and animation, layout and web design, cartooning, comic and graphic novels, advertising, political propaganda, and media at large.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
  
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    ART 2230 - Intro to 3D: Form, Space, Materiality

    Credits: 4
    This course is an introductory level studio art course designed to introduce students to the principles of three-dimensional thinking. In this course, students will develop an understanding of the three fundamental principles of three-dimensional artwork: form, space, and materiality. These principles form the groundwork for all three-dimensional design, planning, and the building of forms in real space, such as: product design, sculpture, installation art, fashion, environmental art, and architecture. Through professor led assignments, lectures, field trips, tool and material demos, and group critiques, students will utilize basic sculptural and fabrication processes and readily available materials to investigate three-dimensional making, ideas, and design.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
  
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    ART 2240 - Mapping the Medieval City

    Credits: 4


    This course explores the relationship between the medieval city and the present day Italian cities of San Gimignano, Florence, Siena and Rome through photography, drawing, museum visits, writing, geographical studies, walking tours, mapping, digital journaling, video, and social media. Drawing from sources as diverse as art and architectural history, Situationist theory (drive), spatial semiotics and landscape history, this interdisciplinary humanities course makes connections between past and present through imaginative examinations of visual artifacts. Tools include iPads, cameras and drawing materials. Topics include art and architectural history, mapping and digital timelines. Themes include time, space, continuity, displacement, hybridity, spirituality, the body and community. Activities in critical and creative thinking lead to student-led on-site presentations, student-led walking tours, mapping exercises and a final interdisciplinary project or paper that takes an in-depth look at the relationship between the individual, the environment, culture and history.

     

  
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    ART 2250 - Independent Studio I

    Credits: 4
    This course is an intermediate-level studio art course focused on helping students begin to understand their own unique artmaking practice. The projects assigned in this class are non-medium specific, and specifically designed to encourage the student to start to identify their own artistic preferences, styles, and tastes. Through weekly one-on-one meetings with faculty, monthly group progress critiques, and formal reviews, students will investigate, hone, and expand upon their own artistic interests, and art-making habits. Semester projects based around research, navigating failure, collaboration, and the student’s unique personal voice will be explored.
    Prerequisite(s): Four studio courses from the following list: ART1210, VPA1220, DES1230, ART1270, ART1710, FAA2220, ART2230, VPA2450, DES2840, DES2850
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
  
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    ART 2260 - Art of the Portrait

    Credits: 4
    This elemental drawing class uses structured weekly projects based on the portrait. Goals will be to develop skills of observation, an understanding of anatomy, proportion, and how light reveals form. The course will also cover the historical aspects of the portrait, relating to composition, symbolism, and style. Teaching will involve weekly demonstrations, individual instruction and group critiques. Students will work with various media, including pencil, charcoal and conte crayon, using photographs and live models.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
  
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    ART 2270 - Painting II

    Credits: 4


     Painting II in an intermediate-level studio class that continues the techniques and theories introduced in Painting I: Expression and Color. The course explores both acrylic and oil paints, as well as introduces students to less traditional media through the lens of painting. Plein air painting, the figure, and action painting are explored amongst other genres and techniques. Greater emphasis given to the students’ own artistic interest, while encouraging experimentation with materials and visual-structural systems. Through weekly in-class exercises, and multi-week assignments, as well as professor-led demos, lectures, critiques, and discussion, students will develop a substantive body of painting-based artwork.

     
    Prerequisite(s): ART 1270   or permission of the instructor.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core.
    Note: Added prerequisite

  
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    ART 2610 - The Art of Ancient Egypt, Hither Asia, and the Aegean

    Credits: 4
    Explores the art, culture, and history of the ancient civilizations of Mesopotamia (modern Iraq and Iran), Egypt, and the Aegean.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core.
  
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    ART 2620 - Classical Art

    Credits: 4
    This course will serve as a focused overview of Classical Art throughout the Mediterranean. From Ancient Greece to the height of the Roman Empire, we will study the major art works, architectures, and artists of this time, and see their connection to adjacent cultures in Africa and the Middle East. We will explore the foundations of Western culture, and how art of this time reflected major historical events and everyday life in Greece, Etruria, and Rome.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core.
  
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    ART 2630 - The Art of the Middle Ages

    Credits: 4
    This course explores the art, history and cultures of medieval Europe and the Mediterranean basin following the ruin of Imperial Rome to c. 1350. Special attention will be given to the sacred texts, objects, and spaces that were created in the service of Christian, Jewish, and Muslim religions. Sample topics include, but are not limited to, artistic and religious traditions, ritual theory and practice, iconography and iconoclasm, illuminated manuscripts, medieval knowledge, patronage, pilgrimage, and cultural interactions. Course work includes required readings, research projects, slide lectures, and class discussions. Course objectives are to introduce creative solutions to historic problems, foster visual and religious literacy, and advance critical thinking. Course counts toward a minor in Jewish, Christian, Muslim relations.
    Fulfills: AL and W in LS Core.
  
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    ART 2640 - First Light: The Beginnings of Modernism in Western Art

    Credits: 4
    An exploration of the art and architecture of the early Italian Renaissance, with emphasis on the economic, social, political, religious, intellectual and aesthetic conditions that gave it birth.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core.
  
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    ART 2650 - Artists, Princes, and Popes: From Renaissance to Reformation

    Credits: 4
    The art, culture, and history of late fifteenth-and sixteenth-century Italy, from Leonardo da Vinci to the aging Michelangelo, and the patrons who inspired some of the grandest achievements in all of Western Art.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core.
  
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    ART 2660 - The Art of the Baroque: European Art of the 17th and 18th Centuries

    Credits: 4
    The art and architecture of a flamboyant age which saw at its conclusion the rise of the modern world.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core.
  
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    ART 2670 - 19th Century Art

    Credits: 4
    An exploration of the art and culture of Europe and America when scientific advances became common, the Industrial Revolution transformed society, and art and architecture were redefined in modern terms.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core.
  
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    ART 2680 - Early 20th Century Art: The Development of Modernist Art

    Credits: 4
    The development of major movements in Europe and the United States in painting, sculpture, and architecture, from the turn-of-the-century to the end of World War II.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core.
  
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    ART 2690 - Postmodern Art and Beyond

    Credits: 4
    Contemporary art is always evolving. Many cultural shifts took hold in the 1960s. How did this impact art and its processes? How did it influence the comprehension of art itself? This course will provide an understanding of those cultural shifts and how they became the context for art-making. Through readings, lectures, discussions and experiential field trips we will explore what is contemporary art and why it is important to the human condition. The course will consist of readings, watching/reading online content, written assignments, online discussions, digital presentations, and class trips.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
  
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    ART 3270 - Advanced Painting

    Credits: 4
    A course for experienced painters to produce a focused body of work done in serial development. In addition to studio work, student will investigate the serial approach of selected painters.
  
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    ART 3300 - Professional Practice for the Visual Artist

    Credits: 4


    This course focuses on career preparation and development for visual artists. It presents a wide variety of professional tools and business skills including subjects such as writing cover letters, statements and proposals, formatting standards for artist CVs/Resumes, building a professional website, and professional goal setting. The course also provides insight into cultivating relationships with galleries, museums and alternative spaces; self-initiated projects and exhibitions; networking and public relations; applying for grants and residencies; applying for internships, jobs and graduate schools; and locating helpful resources. Students will also learn how to effectively utilize the O’Brien Center for Career Development as a vital resource during their time at Merrimack. Through professor led lectures, assignments, practical exercises, guest speakers, field trips, and studio visits with professional artists, students will gain the practical skills and contextual insight needed to navigate the professional artworld. 

     
    Prerequisite(s): ART 2250  

  
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    ART 3420 - A Cultural History of Photography

    Credits: 4
    The various social and material uses, styles, and genres of photography are discussed within social, political and aesthetic dimensions that have occurred in the medium from its conception, as well as drawing parallels between this history and contemporary issues. Students develop an awareness of the sociopolitical and psychological forces concerning photographic meaning, and the power of a photograph to manipulate truth in mass culture.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core.
  
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    ART 3450 - Basic Digital Photography

    Credits: 4
    Students develop visual ability in photography through the in-depth study of DSLR camera functions, composition, light and time, while processing photographic images in a digital darkroom lab setting utilizing Adobe Photoshop. Analysis of photographic work from different genres and styles elicit development of a photographic vision. Through shooting assignments, students explore technology and ways of seeing photographically, working toward the development of an on-line portfolio. A DSLR (Digital Single Lens Reflex) camera is required. Students are expected to work outside of class to finish projects.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core.
  
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    ART 3620 - Problems in Classical Art

    Credits: 4
    A thematic study of the impact of the classical tradition upon Western art. Specific topics vary from year to year, with an emphasis on the persistence of classicism into the 20th century. Most recently the course has focused upon the nude as a form of art, inherited from ancient Greece, neglected, and then re-formed, and inspiring some of the greatest works of art of the modern world.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core.
  
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    ART 3650 - The World of Michelangelo

    Credits: 4
    The course will deal with the life, art, and times of Michelangelo: the history of Florence from the age of Lorenzo the Magnificent to the end of the city’s Republican institution and the installment of the hereditary Medici rule; the history of the papacy, its attempts to combat the crisis of faith within the Church, and its struggle with the monarchs of Europe; and with Michelangelo the man, the artist, and the Christian, who in his life sought but was unable to stand apart from the conflicts of his epoch, and in his sculpture, painting and architecture, drawing and poetry, gave expression to these conflicts with a scope and depth equaled by none of his contemporaries. Few were able to escape the power and reach of his influence. His age saw itself through the images that he created for it.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core.
  
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    ART 3680 - Topics in Modern Art

    Credits: 4
    Introduces specific issues and approaches in the study of modern art. Sample topics include (but are not limited to) Impressionism, Symbolism, Cubism, and Expressionism. Most recently the focus of the course was landscape European and American, with an emphasis on the Hudson River School. By focusing on a specific topic within modern art, the course develops the student’s writing and critical skills through intensive study that is not possible in a survey course.
    Fulfills: AL and X in LS Core
  
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    ART 4900 - Directed Study

    Credits: 4
    Qualified students may propose a course of individual study to be conducted under the direction of a member of the Department.
  
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    ART 4910 - Art/Art History Internship

    Credits: 4
    On or off-campus internship, which involves the student in hands-on-experience in the arts. Under the supervision of a visual and performing arts faculty member, culminating in a field-related project (comprehensive report, mid-term and final portfolio,  performance, exhibit, etc.) Open to juniors and seniors with consent of their visual and performing arts faculty advisor.
    Prerequisite(s): Open only to Visual and Performing Arts majors. .
    Fulfills: AL and X in LS Core
  
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    ART 4920 - Art/Art History Internship

    Credits: 4
    On or off-campus internship, which involves the student in hands-on-experience in the arts. Under the supervision of a visual and performing arts faculty member, culminating in a field-related project (comprehensive report, mid-term and final portfolio,  performance, exhibit, etc.) Open to juniors and seniors with consent of their visual and performing arts faculty advisor.
    Prerequisite(s): Open only to Visual and Performing Arts majors. 
    Fulfills: AL and X in LS Core
  
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    ART 4930 - Special Topics-Art/Art History

    Credits: 2 to 8
    This studio art course focuses on the unique history, theories, and aesthetics of the field of character design. From Frankenstein to Star Wars to the Keebler Elves, character design plays a critical role in literature, illustration, animation, film/video production, graphic novels, cartooning, and product design and advertising. It is a unique and complex area of visual storytelling, which can greatly influence the success or failure of a project. This course provides an in-depth investigation of the fundamental elements that lead to successful character design. The class delves into the history of the field starting at its birth in the mid-20th century, and provides examples of its impact on pop-culture, advertising, and storytelling.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
  
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    ART 4950 - Senior Portfolio-Art

    Credits: 4
    This course is meant to be taken in the senior year after all or nearly all of the required studio courses for the Art/Art History major have been completed. Students prepare a professional quality portfolio, as well as identity elements dealing with business communications as it relates to their field. Additionally, students prepare their senior capstone project for exhibition in a professional gallery setting learning how to work collaboratively and in the public environs. Students will be expected to work outside of class to finish projects.
    Fulfills: X in LS Core
  
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    ART 4960 - Senior Seminar-Art/Art History

    Credits: 4
  
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    DES 1230 - Elements of 2D Design

    Credits: 4
    Introduction to the vocabulary and grammar of visual composition. The basic design elements of figure-ground, point, line, shape, tone, color, texture, pattern and space are explored through project assignments. Concept, content, composition, and craft are examined as interlocking components. Classes include short lectures, discussion of reading assignments, software demonstrations, and in-class studio work. Students are expected to work outside of class to finish projects.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core.
  
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    DES 2820 - Elements of Dynamic Media

    Credits: 4
    This course is an intermediate project-based “STEAM” course that provides artists, designers and “creative coders” with a broad exploration of technology, computation, coding, media and design. Students develop a base theoretical and technical understanding of the computer and the internet-how they work, how they are structured and why. Simultaneously students develop weekly projects using Processing a free software “sketchbook.” This software sketchbook and the projects that students undertake using it intuitively and creatively help them learn “how to speak machine.” Through a series of project-based prototyping projects students use images, sensors, cameras, video, typography and code to create experiments, projects and interactions. The primary goals of this project-based course are (1) building digital literacy (2) building visual literacy (3) building dynamic media fluency (4) developing design thinking. Secondary exploration includes typography, layout, file formats, media standards, color and interactivity.
  
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    DES 2830 - Graphic Design Studio I

    Credits: 4


    Formerly: Intro Typography + Graph Design
    In this introductory studio graphic design course students learn and apply typographic and graphic design principles. This course focuses on the development of typographic knowledge and skills through the completion of multiple communicative and expressive projects. Students explore the formal elements of typography and graphic design, including but not limited to typeface identification, classification, technologies, selection, and usage. Students develop an understanding of typography as a system, while considering hierarchy, legibility, media, composition and craft. Within each project, students develop and explore typographic layouts and grid systems. Students apply these principles, while developing a basic understanding of the design process. This process includes concept generation, refinement and production. Classes include short lectures, critique, discussion of reading and writing assignments, software demonstrations, and in-class studio work. Students are expected to work outside of class to finish projects.

     
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core

  
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    DES 2840 - Visual Storytelling

    Credits: 4


    Formerly: Image Making and Meaning
    This course introduces students to the fundamentals of image-making to explore communication, or storytelling, utilizing both  digital technology and traditional techniques. Students develop an understanding of how meaning is constructed through the power of both words and images. Experimental type and image, as well as creating static and motion investigations are woven into projects. Objectives of this course include, but are not limited to: learning creative processes for making images; learning industry vocabulary; developing observation techniques, research and presentation skills; and learning how to successfully produce images for personal, as well as commercial purposes. Digital, physical, and time-based works are explored. Classes include short lectures, discussion of reading assignments, software demonstrations, and in-class studio work. Students are expected to work outside of class to finish projects.

     
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core

  
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    DES 2850 - Videography

    Credits: 4
    This course concentrates on the kinds of issues often confronted by videographers, multimedia artists and communication designers. Production techniques covered include the importance of telling a good story, understanding composition, and shooting on location. Issues concerning narrative and non-narrative video for the web, social media and film, and short vs. long-form video are explored. Editing techniques as applied to video, stills, effects, and audio are covered. Audio mixing, digital photography and digital videography are introduced to the extent necessary for understanding skillful cinematography. Students are expected to work outside of class to finish projects.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core.
  
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    DES 2860 - Graphic Design Studio II

    Credits: 4
    Formerly: Graphic Design I
     This course provides more in-depth study of typography, design processes, technological skills, as well as historical and contemporary professional practice. Projects explore expressive and experimental typography, brand identity, design systems, and differences between print and screen design. Knowledge and learning is through lecture, hands-on presentation, readings, collaboration, and learning-by-doing. Additionally, traditional sketching techniques are employed along with brainstorming sessions. Real client work can be integrated into this course. Projects focus both on creating printed documents and preparing files for electronic dissemination. Classes include short lectures, critique, discussion of reading and writing assignments, computer demonstrations, and in-class studio work. Students are expected to work outside of class to finish projects.
    Prerequisite(s):  DES 2830  or permission of the instructor.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
  
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    DES 3800 - Sophomore Portfolio Review

    Credits: 0


    Formerly: Portfolio Review
    This course is for no-credit, but is required coursework for all sophomore-level students in the Graphic Design major. There is no class time. Students must submit a portfolio with a required number of projects. The portfolio must be submitted after the following prerequisite courses are passed with a minimum grade of a 2.0: DES 2830, DES 2840, and DES 2860. Students should follow the recommended Graphic Design Program of Study to submit their portfolio during winter break in your sophomore year. The portfolio is a compilation of graphic design work and other studio coursework. The requirements of the portfolio are presented at the beginning of each of the prerequisite courses. The portfolio is graded on a pass/no pass basis. Successful completion is necessary to complete the Graphic Design major. It also provides an assessment of a student’s strengths and weaknesses as they begin their higher-level coursework.

     

  
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    DES 3820 - Junior Portfolio Review

    Credits: 0


    This course is for no-credit, but is required coursework for all junior-level students in the Graphic Design major. There is no class time. You must submit a portfolio website with a required number of projects. Your portfolio must be submitted after you pass the following prerequisite courses with a minimum grade of a 2.0: ART1210, DES1230, ART2230, DES2820, DES2830, DES2840, DES2860, DES3840, DES3850, and DES3830 or DES3870. If you follow the recommended Graphic Design Program of Study you should submit your portfolio during winter break in your junior year. 

    The portfolio is a compilation of graphic design work and other studio coursework. The portfolio requirements, due dates, and instructions will be supplied to students within a reasonable timeframe. Your portfolio is graded on a pass/no pass basis. Successful completion is necessary for you to complete the Graphic Design major. It also provides an assessment of your strengths and weaknesses as you begin your higher-level coursework. 

     
    Prerequisite(s): DES 3800  

  
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    DES 3830 - Visual Web Design

    Credits: 4


     

    .In Visual Web Design students learn how to design and present multi-page websites. Through multiple design projects students learn and employ principles of graphic design, information architecture, user experience design and user interface design. Students gain an understanding of “how the web works” by delving into the technologies and code that power the web, while exploring and employing the contemporary tools that are used to design and develop it. Students develop an understanding of contemporary responsive and dynamic visual web design techniques. Classes include short lectures, critique, discussion of reading and writing assignments, software demonstrations, and in-class studio work. Students are expected to work outside of class to finish projects.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core

  
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    DES 3840 - Motion Design

    Credits: 4


    In this intermediate, project-based course students learn the process of creating and understanding motion-based and animated sequences. Motion design is the purposeful use of moving images, content, and sound to convey or express messages. Students explore the fundamental principles of motion in both theory and practice. Projects and assignments can be weekly or they can be multi-week. Contemporary motion design software is combined with traditional animation techniques. Topics in this course can include animated cycles, kinetic typography, sequential structures, kinetic states, sketching and ideation, storyboarding, editing and audio integration. Classes include lectures, critique, discussion, reading and writing assignments, software demonstrations, and in-class studio work. Students are expected to work outside of class to finish projects and assignments.

     
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core

  
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    DES 3850 - History of Graphic Design

    Credits: 4


    The history of graphic design begins with pictographs and prehistoric cave paintings and moves forward to the developments in our digital age. This course introduces students to cultural and communication issues specific to the study of graphic design. Sample topics include, but are not limited to the history of type, type/image, image dominance, the role of technology in design. This course will introduce students to designers from diverse countries and continents, as well as contextualizing design within movements such as Art Nouveau, Art Deco, Bauhaus, Nostalgia, Constructivism, Deconstruction, Post Structuralism, and contemporary approaches to diversity and inclusion. Course includes lectures, discussion, research, writing, oral presentations, exams, and a group project. This course is required of all Graphic Design majors.

     
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core

  
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    DES 3860 - UX Design

    Credits: 4


    Formerly: Computer Illustration
    UX Design is the design of experiences and interactions that users find functional and enjoyable. This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the user experience design process. Lectures and assignments focus on creating experiences for contemporary digital interfaces. Students explore and apply UX concepts and techniques presented through distinct projects that are augmented with lectures, reading and writing assignments. Projects explore user research, problem definition, information architecture, and interactive prototyping. Students practice presenting their ideas and collect feedback for further iterative evaluation and evolution. Students develop a better understanding of what technological standards and tools are utilized for the design of digital products. Technological, design, business and ethical practices are discussed in reference to each projects’ intent. Class time will include short lectures, critique, software demonstrations, discussion of reading and writing assignments and in-class studio work. Students will be expected to work outside of class to finish projects.

     
    Prerequisite(s): DES 2830  or  DES 2840  or permission of the instructor.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core

  
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    DES 3870 - Art Direction

    Credits: 4


    Formerly: Graphic Design 2
    This course is designed to build conceptualization, critical-thinking and project management skills, as well as continued exploration of brand design as applied to 2 and 3-D surfaces and spaces. Art direction is a leadership skill. The role of designer is discussed in reference to various types of projects. Learn how to ask questions, work with vendors and clients, and strategize for a variety of media. Projects are longer in nature resulting in many solutions developed for print, screen, and motion before a final design is revealed. Further industry knowledge in software techniques is also covered. Classes include short lectures, critique, discussion of reading and writing assignments, software demonstrations, and in-class studio work. Students are expected to work outside of class to finish projects.

     
    Prerequisite(s): DES 2860  or permission of the instructor.

  
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    DES 3880 - Advanced Brand Design

    Credits: 4
    Formerly: Graphic Design 3
    This course continues the exploration of the techniques and practices of contemporary graphic design that were introduced in previous courses. Conceptual thinking, image development, typographic design, and design systems are the focus as students develop larger, multi-part projects for print and digital media individually and in groups. The skills and competencies introduced in this course deal with concept development and collaboration through the use of language, typography, image, sound and movement. Generating ideas and developing them into integrated marketing, design, branding and communications are explored. Multiple modes of communication are studied and discussed. If possible, a real client is employed for projects. By the end of the semester a set of intermediate to advanced projects are conceptualized and designed. Students are expected to work outside of class to finish projects.
    Prerequisite(s): DES 3870 .
  
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    DES 3890 - Advanced Interaction Design

    Credits: 4
    Formerly: UX Design
    In this advanced, project-based course students explore the design and development of interactive experiences and interactions. Interaction Design (IxD) explores the “dialogue” between a person and a product, system, or service-which can include games, interactive websites, apps and interfaces. Oftentimes these experiences and interactions are dynamic, meaning that they use data or sensory input to provide information, feedback, expression or experience to the user in an engaging way. This course explores Interaction Design in both theory and practice while also exploring User Experience Design (UX) and Information Architecture (IA). This class may optionally be team-based, experiential or team taught. Classes include short lectures, critique, discussion of reading and writing assignments, software demonstrations, and in-class studio work. Students are expected to work outside of class to finish projects.
    Prerequisite(s): DES 3860 , or permission of the instructor.
  
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    DES 4820 - Graphic Design III

    Credits: 4
    Formerly: Motion Graphics
    This course integrates real client projects and/or interdisciplinary projects with other schools/courses on campus. Projects are most likely complex in nature with multiple elements to be designed. Collaboration, project management, client meetings, and production prep for all designed elements will be required. Classes also include short lectures, discussion of reading assignments, software demonstrations, and in-class studio work in relation to professional industry projects. Students are expected to work outside of class individually, as well as collaboratively in groups.
    Prerequisite(s): DES 3870 , or permission of the instructor.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core.
  
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    DES 4910 - Design Internship

    Credits: 2 - 4 credits


    On or off-campus internship, which involves the student in hands-on-experience in the arts. Under the supervision of a visual and performing arts faculty member, culminating in a field-related project (comprehensive report, mid-term and final portfolio, performance, exhibit, etc.) Open to juniors and seniors with consent of their visual and performing arts faculty advisor.

     
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of an advisor.
    Fulfills: AL and X

  
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    DES 4920 - Graphic Design Internship II

    Credits: 4
    On or off-campus internship, which involves the student in hands-on-experience in the arts. Under the supervision of a visual and performing arts faculty member, culminating in a field-related project (comprehensive report, mid-term and final portfolio, performance, exhibit, etc.) Open to juniors and seniors with consent of their visual and performing arts faculty advisor.
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of an advisor.
    Fulfills: Al and X in LS Core
    Note: Open to juniors and seniors. Graphic Design majors only.
  
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    DES 4930 - Special Topics: Design and the Human Condition

    Credits: 2 - 8 credits


    The design environment impacts us every day. This seminar course will explore core questions about design and its intrinsic links to architecture, engineering, and sustainability. Unlike a technical design class, this course re-orients the conversation about design towards core issues of ethics and the humane. In a world that is developing more rapidly than ever, examining the social ethics of how we interact with designed spaces is increasingly relevant and critically urgent. There is an intrinsic connection between the spaces that we build and how we inhabit them in the full spectrum of what it means to be human. This is a discussion-heavy course which is designed to engage students with design through multiple scales of engagement: the inner, the self, the interpersonal, the communal, and the civic. How do the spaces we design affect our way of being in the world? What does it mean to be beholden to our communities? How is design shaped by the larger forces of society, economy, and political systems? We will focus primarily on design as a vehicle for empathy, sustainability, and social impact.

     
    Fulfills: AL in Ls Core

  
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    DES 4950 - Senior Portfolio: Graphic Design

    Credits: 4
    This course is meant to be taken in the senior year after all or nearly all of the required studio courses for the Graphic Design major have been completed. Students prepare a professional quality portfolio, as well as identity elements dealing with business communications as it relates to their field. Additionally, students prepare their senior capstone project for exhibition in a professional gallery setting learning how to work collaboratively and in the public environs. Students will be expected to work outside of class to finish projects.
    Prerequisite(s): DES 3880  or  DES 3890  , or permission of the instructor.
    Fulfills: X in LS Core
  
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    DES 4960 - Senior Seminar with Thesis-Graphic Design

    Credits: 4
    Topics are selected appropriate to students’ areas of concentration. Required for all Art and Art History, Music, Graphic Design, and Theatre Arts majors. Students design and produce their senior capstone project, as well as defend their work. A public presentation is required.
    Prerequisite(s): DES 3880  or DES 3890  or permission of the instructor.
  
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    MUS 1310 - The Nature of Music: The Art of Listening

    Credits: 4
    A course designed to introduce students to the art of active listening to music. A multiplicity of musical styles and genres are employed in the course as means toward the ultimate goal of developing deeper, more aware listening habits in students’ daily life. The course will include exploration of western classical genres, including opera and the symphony; popular styles like jazz and rock; and folk music of the world, including the Americas.
    Fulfills: AL and X in LS Core.
  
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    MUS 1320 - History of Rock & Roll

    Credits: 4
    This course covers the history of rock music in Western culture, focusing mainly on British and American contributions to the style. It begins with an overview of the musics that were predecessors of rock, including early blues, jazz and rhythm and blues, continues through the birth of rock ‘n’ roll in the 1950, and traces developments throughout the second half of the 20th century and beyond, culminating in a review of current trends. 
    Fulfills: AL and X in LS Core.
  
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    MUS 1321 - The History of Jazz

    Credits: 4
    Formerly: Jazz:  Social and Musical History
    This course covers the development of Jazz as a uniquely American art form. Heavy emphasis will be placed on exploring the “birth” of Jazz in New Orleans at the turn of the 20th century, and the unique social musical context that gave rise to this transformational musical occurrence. From this starting point, steeped in racial and social conflict, we will examine the various trends and developments that have impacted the creation and consumption of this music over the past century. The course will always attempt to examine closely the relationship between this musical evolution and critical political movements that have occurred throughout American history. The global impact of Jazz as a musical revolution and the influence it has managed to exert on other forms of music throughout the world will also be examined in some detail. In short, this course is both a comprehensive survey of major trends in Jazz music as well as a collective critical assessment of how we tell the story of our own unique musical heritage. 
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
  
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    MUS 1325 - Singing for Educators

    Credits: 4
    This course provides opportunities for the development of two skill sets for aspiring educators. Students will create multi-sensory curricula connecting song to a wide range of subjects, including language, math, history, and science. Through a singing and gentle movement series, participants will strengthen and learn to take care of their voices, an often overlooked aspect of the teaching profession.
  
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    MUS 1330 - Survey of American Music

    Credits: 4
    A survey of American music from the colonial era to the present, examining folk, popular, art, sacred, and secular music traditions in the United States within their cultural and historical contexts. A comprehensive survey of major trends in American musical history and a collective critical assessment of how Americans tell the story of their own musical heritage. Emphasis is placed on discussion, critical assessment of sources, and developing active listening skills. 
    Fulfills: AL and X in LS Core.
  
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    MUS 1340 - The Concept Album

    Credits: 4
    MUS1340 is a course exploring the musical genre of the concept album. The class is designed to introduce students to the art of active listening and the practice of informed and skilled analysis. A multiplicity of musical styles, including pop, country, folk, rock, alternative, metal and rap, are employed in the course as means toward the ultimate goal of developing deeper, more aware listening habits in the students’ daily lives.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
  
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    MUS 1350 - Athletic Bands

    Credits: 1
    The Merrimack College Marching Band and Pep Band are performing ensembles representing the students, faculty, staff, alumni, and fans in spirited fashion. This ensemble performs at all home Men’s Hockey games in the Lawler Arena with the exception of games occurring over winter break.
    Note: Students may register for any combination of ensembles up to a total of 8 credits.
  
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    MUS 1351 - Jazz Ensemble

    Credits: 1
    This course is designed to give students experience rehearsing and performing in a large jazz ensemble. Development of jazz interpretation, ensemble skills, improvisational skills, and techniques specific to the jazz idion are explored in depth. Pieces are selected to meet the individual needs of the group and are representative of a wide variety of jazz styles.
    Note: Students may register for any combination of ensembles up to a total of 8 credits.
  
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    MUS 1352 - Concert Choir

    Credits: 1


    This course will give students experience in rehearsing and performing in a vocal ensemble. Students will explore vocal techniques, ensemble skills, solfege skills, and techniques specific to vocal music.. All singers who wish to sing and grow in musical understanding are welcome to take part. The ability to read music is not required, but basic pitch-matching is expected. Musical compositions will reflect a diversity of choral styles and genres.

     
    Note: Students may register for any combination of ensembles up to a total of 8 credits.

  
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    MUS 1353 - Schola Choir and Liturgical Ensemble

    Credits: 1
    In this ensemble course, singers and instrumentalists have the opportunity to learn and perform music in a liturgical context. The Schola Choir and Liturgical Ensemble leads music at the weekly student Sunday Masses on campus, as well as music for special liturgical days, such as Ash Wednesday. The Schola also performs at an annual Lessons and Carols concert and a spring performance. All singers who wish to sing and grow in musical understanding are welcome to take part. The ability to read music is not required, but basic pitch-matching is expected. Singers will develop vocal techniques, ensemble techniques, and contextual understanding in this course. Instrumentalists who have the ability to read music, or guitarists who can read chord symbols, are very welcome and integral to the group.
    Note: Students may register for any combination of ensembles up to a total of 8 credits.
  
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    MUS 1354 - Concert Band

    Credits: 1
    The Merrimack College Concert Band is a performing ensemble composed of Merrimack students.  This ensemble performs several concerts on and off campus throughout the school year.  The Concert Band will focus on repertoire specific to the concert band idiom and feature many cornerstone musical compositions by composers such as Holst, Copland, Grainger, and Sousa.  Instruments not found in jazz band or marching band will be utilized in this ensemble, such as Oboe, Bassoon, French Horn, and concert percussion such as Timpani.
    Note: Students may register for any combination of ensembles up to a total of 8 credits.
     
  
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    MUS 1360 - Group Guitar Class

    Credits: 2
    This course will allow beginning guitar students to develop skills sufficient to accompany themselves and others. Students will develop the ability to perform a basic repertory of traditional, folk and popular songs in several keys, with and without printed music.
  
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    MUS 1361 - Group Voice Class

    Credits: 2
    This course will allow students to develop basic skills in voice, especially as related to group singing. Students will develop the ability to communicate using a basic repertory of traditional, folk, and popular songs.
  
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    MUS 1362 - Group Percussion Class

    Credits: 2
    This course will allow beginning students to develop the knowledge of and performance ability on percussion instruments sufficient to facilitate rhythm-based musical experiences for individuals and groups.
  
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    MUS 1371 - Individual Music Lessons Guitar

    Credits: 1
    Individual Music Lessons are designed to give students the chance to create music in an experiential, individualized learning environment. Students will work in a one to one setting with the instructor. The course will meet for 10 hours per semester at a time to be arranged. Due to the individualized instruction of this Applied Instruction, a course fee of $650 per semester will be billed in addition to standard tuition.
  
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    MUS 1372 - Individual Music Lessons Voice

    Credits: 1
    Formerly: Individual Music Lessons are designed to give students the chance to create music in an experiential, individualized learning environment. Students will work in a one to one setting with the instructor. The course will meet for 10 hours per semester at a time to be arranged. Due to the individualized instruction of this Applied Instruction, a course fee of $650 per semester will be billed in addition to standard tuition.
  
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    MUS 1373 - Individual Music Lessons Drums

    Credits: 1
    Individual Music Lessons are designed to give students the chance to create music in an experiential, individualized learning environment. Students will work in a one to one setting with the instructor. The course will meet for 10 hours per semester at a time to be arranged. Due to the individualized instruction of this Applied Instruction, a course fee of $650 per semester will be billed in addition to standard tuition.
  
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    MUS 1374 - Individual Music Lessons Winds

    Credits: 1


    Individual Music Lessons are designed to give students the chance to create music in an experiential, individualized learning environment. Students will work in a one to one setting with the instructor. The course will meet for 10 hours per semester at a time to be arranged. Due to the individualized instruction of this Applied Instruction, a course fee of $650 per semester will be billed in addition to standard tuition.

     

 

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