Jul 16, 2019  
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Visual and Performing Arts

  
  •  

    FAA 2270 - Basic Painting II

    Credits: 4
    A continuation of FAA 1270 A. The student is encouraged to experiment with materials and visual-structural systems.
    Prerequisite(s): FAA 1270 or permission of the instructor.
    Fulfills: Humanities distribution requirement. AL in LS Core.
    Note: Added prerequisite
  
  •  

    FAA 2301 - Music History I: Antiquity to the Baroque

    Credits: 4
    The first half of a two-semester sequence surveying the music of the western classical tradition. This course examines the creation and development of musical genres throughout the historical periods from classical antiquity in Greece and Rome to the culmination of the Baroque. Emphases on active listening, writing about music, and the study of genres within their social and historical contexts.
    Fulfills: Humanities distribution requirement. AL and H in LS Core.
  
  •  

    FAA 2302 - Music History II: Classical to the 21st Century

    Credits: 4
    The second half of a two-semester sequence surveying the music of the western classical tradition. This course examines the creation and development of musical genres throughout the historical periods from the Enlightenment through the present day. Emphases on active listening, writing about music, and the study of genres within their social historical contexts.
    Fulfills: Humanities distribution requirement. AL or H in LS Core.
  
  •  

    FAA 2360 - Elementary Music Theory: Understanding Musical Notation

    Credits: 4
    This course is structured to teach students the basic skills necessary in order to read, study and perform from musical notation. Musical elements including pitch, rhythm, the staff system, key and time signatures, intervals and chords, and modulation will be examined.
    Fulfills: Humanities distribution requirement. AL in LS Core.
  
  •  

    FAA 2380 - The Architecture of Music: From Phrase to Opera

    Credits: 4 cr.
    This course is designed to teach students about formal structure in musical compositions. While emphasis will be placed on specific classical genres, including the sonata, symphony, and opera, students will be encouraged towards individual exploration of form in music of other styles and traditions as well, such as world music, jazz, and rock.
    Fulfills: Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills AL in LS Core.
  
  •  

    FAA 2420 - A Cultural History of Photography

    Credits: 4
    The various forms, uses, styles, and genres of photography will be examined within social, philosophical, and aesthetic dimensions that have evolved in the medium from its beginnings through the 1980s. Students will participate in darkroom laboratory exercises and demonstrations in photochemical production.
    Fulfills: Humanities distribution requirement. AL in LS Core.
  
  •  

    FAA 2450 - Basic Digital Photography

    Credits: 4
    Students will develop visual literacy in a digital context to create, share, and publish photographs. Examples of photographic work from history and the philosophy of photography will provide a foundation for the development of a photographic vision. Composition, manipulation, restoration, and creating images for other uses, such as for print vs. screen, will be explored. Students will also complete an on-line portfolio. A Digital SLR camera is required.
    Fulfills: Humanities distribution requirement. AL in LS Core.
  
  •  

    FAA 2500 - Women in Theatre

    Credits: 4
    The study of women in theatre - primarily as subjects and playwrights but also as actors, designers, and directors. Course examines how gender is constructed and influenced through the work of women artists. Explores the role(s) of women in the theatre by addressing questions of racial identity, religion, sexuality, body image, and cooperative artistry. Research papers, performance projects and attendance at one outside performance required.
    Fulfills: AL and D in LS Core
  
  •  

    FAA 2505 - The Politics of Performance: Theatre, Government, and Social Change

    Credits: 4
    Theatre has consistently made a significant impact on the socio-political structures in which it is performed. From the politics of the ancient world to the present day, theatre artists have used their art form to challenge the status quo, to expose unjust systems of oppression, to effect change in the social network. Likewise, government uses elements of theatre to promote particular agendas and suppress individuals and social groups who challenge the dominant groups claims to political power. Drawing of the long and varied history of theatre, this course will explore the political nature of theatre and the relationship between theatre arts, political ideologies, institutional structures, and efforts at social change between 1900 and the present day.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
  
  •  

    FAA 2510 - Acting II

    Credits: 4
    A second level acting class for those students who have completed Acting I (FAA 1510 ). This class is conducted as an intensive performance workshop where the focus is on refining acting skills and approaching classical and contemporary texts. Students will expand knowledge of acting theory through an introduction to the work of Michael Chekhov. Assignments include reading, written work, script analysis and preparation of monologues and scenes.
    Prerequisite(s): FAA 1510  or permission of the instructor.
    Fulfills: Humanities distribution requirement. AL and X in LS Core.
  
  •  

    FAA 2520 - Theatre History Part One: Origins to Renaissance

    Credits: 4
    The first half of a two semester sequence exploring Western and Non-Western theatre history. Examination of dramatic literature and theatrical practice from the origins of theatre to the English Renaissance. Focus is on three basic areas of inquiry: the physical theatre, the social theatre, and the performing theatre. Research papers and performance projects required.
    Fulfills: Humanities distribution requirement. AL or H in LS Core.
  
  •  

    FAA 2530 - Theatre History Part Two: Restoration to the Present

    Credits: 4
    The second half of a two semester sequence exploring Western and Non-Western theatre history. This course examines dramatic literature and theatrical practice from the English Restoration to the contemporary theatre. Explores the physical, social, cultural, and historical evidence that leads us to hypotheses and conclusions as theatre historians. Includes Introduction to theatre historiography. Research papers and performance projects required.
    Fulfills: Humanities distribution requirement. AL or H in LS Core.
  
  •  

    FAA 2540 - Introduction to Playwriting

    Credits: 4
    Class involves intensive workshop style format devoted to the activity of writing for the stage. Examination of terminology, theory, principles, and methods of playwriting. Explores sources for developing dramatic works as well as strategies for critiquing new work. Class encourages creativity and discipline around the practice of playwriting. Course culminates in the writing and stage readings of students generated one-act plays.
    Fulfills: Humanities distribution requirement. AL in LS Core.
  
  •  

    FAA 2550(W) - American Musical Theater

    Credits: 4
    An examination of the Broadway musical, exploring the history, music, and literature of this uniquely American art form. Students will study the structure, terminology, practitioners, organization and history of the American musical from 1866 through the present. Students will have the option to include an onstage performance as part of the course requirements.
    Fulfills: AL and W in LS Core
  
  •  

    FAA 2560 - London Theatre

    Credits: 4
    Students will discover, through in-class study and travel to London, what makes London one of the world’s most important theatre cities. Beginning with Shakespeare and continuing to the present day, students will study significant theatrical figures, the cultural phenomena that shaped theatrical traditions, and the influence held by other European theatres and practitioners upon the London stage. Students will travel to London over Spring Break to witness live theatre, participate in workshops, meet practitioners, and gain greater appreciation for the role London holds as a global theatrical capital.
    Fulfills: Humanities distribution requirement. AL and X in LS Core.
    Note: Additional fees for travel apply.
  
  •  

    FAA 2570 - Technical Production for the Theatre

    Credits: 4
    This class introduces students to the practices and techniques used in technical theatre with a focus on the Rogers Center for the Arts. Students will learn how to safely and effectively use equipment and tools used in lighting, sound and scenery construction as well as how to effectively run a show. Course requires outside preparation of projects that demonstrate practical and theoretical knowledge of the techniques and practices learned.
    Prerequisite(s): Theater Arts major or minor or permission of the instructor.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
    Note: Added prerequisite.
  
  •  

    FAA 2580 - Design for the Theatre

    Credits: 4
    This course explores the world of design for the theatre including scenery, lighting and costumes. Students will be exposed to a variety of plays and learn how to read and analyze them from a designer’s perspective. Students will learn how to collaborate with other designers and directors. Students will learn how t generate and communicate design ideas through drafting, rendering and model-making.
    Prerequisite(s): FAA 2570 or permission of the instructor.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
    Note: Added prerequisite.
  
  •  

    FAA 2585 - Improvisation

    Credits: 4
    This course introduces the history, theories, principles, and practices of theatrical improvisation, including exercises, games, and situational scenes designed to hone performance skills. The course introduces both short and long form Improvisation.
    Prerequisite(s): Theatre major or minor or permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    FAA 2586 - Script Analysis

    Credits: 4
    Using formalist analysis as a starting point, this course examines the process of analyzing theatrical texts, with specific consideration for the needs of the actor, the director, and the theatrical designer in a theoretically practical situation. Through careful study of play texts from as early as 430 BC up to the present, students will utilize traditional classifications to analyze individual elements of a text in order to better understand their meaning and purpose in relation to the artistic whole and/or how the individual work relate to the corpus of a particular playwright.
  
  •  

    FAA 2590 - Arts Management

    Credits: 4
    This course serves to introduce students to the challenging and exciting world of arts management. Through units of study that will include mission statements, board development, fundraising, marketing, strategic planning etc., students will be able to relate principles of business management to various arts organizations. Students will be exposed to the various arts organization in the Merrimack Valley and see principles of arts management in action.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
  
  •  

    FAA 2610 - The Art of Ancient Egypt, Hither Asia, and the Aegean

    Credits: 4
    Explores the art, culture, and history of the ancient civilizations of Mesopotamia (modern Iraq and Iran), Egypt, and the Aegean.
    Fulfills: Humanities distribution requirement. AL in LS Core.
  
  •  

    FAA 2620 - Classical Art

    Credits: 4
    Explores the foundations of Western culture in the art and history of ancient Greece, Etruria, and Rome.
    Fulfills: Humanities distribution requirement. AL in LS Core.
  
  •  

    FAA 2630 - The Art of the Middle Ages

    Credits: 4
    This course explores the art, history and cultures of medieval Europe and the Mediterranean basin following the ruin of Imperial Rome to c. 1350. Special attention will be given to the sacred texts, objects, and spaces that were created in the service of Christian, Jewish, and Muslim religions. Sample topics include, but are not limited to, artistic and religious traditions, ritual theory and practice, iconography and iconoclasm, illuminated manuscripts, medieval knowledge, patronage, pilgrimage, and cultural interactions. Course work includes required readings, research projects, slide lectures, and class discussions. Course objectives are to introduce creative solutions to historic problems, foster visual and religious literacy, and advance critical thinking. Course counts toward a minor in Jewish, Christian, Muslim relations.
    Fulfills: Humanities distribution requirement. AL and W in LS Core.
  
  •  

    FAA 2640(W) - First Light: The Beginnings of Modernism in Western Art

    Credits: 4
    An exploration of the art and architecture of the early Italian Renaissance, with emphasis on the economic, social, political, religious, intellectual and aesthetic conditions that gave it birth.
    Fulfills: Humanities distribution requirement. AL in LS Core.
  
  •  

    FAA 2650 - Artists, Princes, and Popes: From Renaissance to Reformation

    Credits: 4
    The art, culture, and history of late fifteenth-and sixteenth-century Italy, from Leonardo da Vinci to the aging Michelangelo, and the patrons who inspired some of the grandest achievements in all of Western Art.
    Fulfills: Humanities distribution requirement. AL in LS Core.
  
  •  

    FAA 2660 - The Art of the Baroque: European Art of the 17th and 18th Centuries

    Credits: 4
    The art and architecture of a flamboyant age which saw at its conclusion the rise of the modern world.
    Fulfills: Humanities distribution requirement. AL in LS Core.
  
  •  

    FAA 2670 - 19th Century Art

    Credits: 4
    An exploration of the art and culture of Europe and America when scientific advances became common, the Industrial Revolution transformed society, and art and architecture were redefined in modern terms.
    Fulfills: Humanities distribution requirement. AL in LS Core.
  
  •  

    FAA 2680 - Early 20th Century Art: The Development of Modernist Art

    Credits: 4
    The development of major movements in Europe and the United States in painting, sculpture, and architecture, from the turn-of-the-century to the end of World War II.
    Fulfills: Humanities distribution requirement. AL in LS Core.
  
  •  

    FAA 2690 - Modern, Postmodern, and Beyond: Art from 1945 to the Present

    Credits: 4
    An examination of the art, culture, and history of post-War Europe and the United States, with particular focus on the shift of artistic influence from the Old World to the New, and the challenges presented by innovative technologies and ‘commodity culture’.
    Fulfills: Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement.
  
  •  

    FAA 2830 - Layout Analysis and Construction

    Credits: 4
    In this studio course you will be introduced to the basics of visual communication and effective layout design for print and screen. Topics covered: introduction to typography; visual hierarchy; color theory and meaning; grid construction; type and image integration; print vs. screen design; and industry software knowledge. Additionally, the course will further your understanding of how to manipulate the Design Elements and Principles for effective and meaningful communication. Woven into each project will be interdisciplinary study. Examples of this are: going to see a play and then designing a poster; or designing an App for NASA’s “Image for a Day” or Robert Shetterly’s portrait series, “Americans Who Tell the Truth.” An interdisciplinary approach helps you understand how much Design is everywhere.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
  
  •  

    FAA 2840 - Image Making and Meaning

    Credits: 4
    This course introduces students to the fundamentals of image-making primary through the use of digital technology. The difference between vector and pixel, large vs. small screen, and print vs. mobile are among the topics explored. Project research and oral presentation will also be explored. Objectives of this class include, but are not limited to: learning creative processes for making images; learning and utilizing vocabulary in reference to the Elements and Principles of Design; developing observation techniques, research and presentation skills; and learning how to successfully produce images for personal, as well as commercial purposes. Classes include short lectures, discussion of reading assignments, software demonstrations, and in-class studio work. Students are expected to work outside of class to finish projects.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
  
  •  

    FAA 2850 - Movie Making

    Credits: 4
    This course will concentrate on the kinds of issues often confronted by today’s multimedia artists. Though studio production techniques will be covered, the importance of telling a good story and shooting on locale for various purposes will be explored. Issues concerning video on the web, in multimedia titles and on DVDs will be covered. Editing techniques as applied to video, stills, animation, and audio will be covered. Audio mixing and digital photography will be covered to the extent necessary for skillful editing. DVD production will be introduced. 
    Prerequisite(s): FAA 2840  or permission of the instructor. (Film minors do not need prerequisite).
    Fulfills: Humanities distribution requirement. AL in LS Core.
  
  •  

    FAA 2860 - Graphic Design I

    Credits: 4
    This course provides more study of typography, design processes, technological skills, as well as historical and contemporary practice. Projects will explore the study of letterforms, text composition, layout and page systems, expressive typography, proportion and grids, visual hierarchy, readability/legibility issues, and differences between print and screen design. Knowledge and learning will be through lecture, hands-on presentation, readings, collaboration, and learning-by- doing. Additionally, traditional sketching techniques will be employed along with brainstorming sessions. Projects will focus both on creating printed documents and preparing files for electronic dissemination. Classes will include short lectures, computer demonstrations, and in-class studio work. Students will be expected to work outside of class to finish projects, a blog, and readings not finished during class.
    Prerequisite(s):  FAA 2830  or permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    FAA 3100 - Music and Spirituality

    Credits: 4
    This course uses musical activity as a lens to explore the multifarious ways in which music participants seek to connect with the sacred world. During the course of the semester, we will investigate a variety of compositions from many different cultures, geographical locations, and time periods that directly address the divine. Our central questions will include the following: How can music become a conduit for accessing the spiritual realm? Must specific conditions be in place to do so? Why are music and religion so closely connected in such a myriad of cultures?
    Fulfills: AL and X in LS Core. AL in LS Core.
  
  •  

    FAA 3171 - Music and Politics

    Credits: 4
    This course explores how music has been used as a means of expressing political will and as a political tool over history and around the world. We will study the use of protest music by those challenging political institutions as well as how political actors have treated music as a political tool. We will look at the political dynamics that gave rise to and found expression in particular genres of music and also consider questions of censorship and government control of music. This is an interdisciplinary course, and will approach the material through a blend of materials and approaches from disciplines including musicology, history, and political science.  
    Cross-Listed: POL 3171  
    Fulfills: D in LS Core area requirements, AL or SOSC in LS Core course requirements.
    Note: New course. 
  
  •  

    FAA 3270 - Advanced Painting

    Credits: 4
    A course for experienced painters to produce a focused body of work done in serial development. In addition to studio work, student will investigate the serial approach of selected painters.
  
  •  

    FAA 3360 - Principles of Composition

    Credits: 4
    A course designed to teach the student the basic techniques of writing music - including aspects of structure, instrumental usage, handling of different textures and compositional principles. Intensive creative work, often leading to readings of this music and a final work in performance will lead the student to both technical and musical self- expression.
    Prerequisite(s): FAA 2360  or permission of the instructor.
    Fulfills: Humanities distribution requirement. AL in LS Core.
  
  •  

    FAA 3450 - Basic Digital Photography

    Credits: 4
    Students will develop visual ability in a digital context to make, share, and publish photographs. Examples of photographic work from the history and philosophy of photography will provide for the development of a photographic vision. Composition, manipulation, restoration, and creating images for other uses, such as Power point, will be stressed. Students will also develop an on-line portfolio. A digital camera capable of 3 mega pixels or greater is required.
    Fulfills: Humanities distribution requirement. AL in LS Core.
  
  •  

    FAA 3510 - Directing I

    Credits: 4
    An introduction to the three major areas of directing: script analysis, directing fundamentals, and practice. Students will explore through readings, written and practical exercises the goals and processes of directing for the theatre. Course culminates in a public-performance of student directed ten minute scenes.
    Prerequisite(s): FAA 1510  or permission of the instructor.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
  
  •  

    FAA 3520 - Acting III: Special Topics in Acting

    Credits: 4
    This is an upper level acting class that explores special topics in acting. Specific topics vary from year to year with emphasis on advanced techniques such as: period/style, commedia dell’larte, physical theatre, puppetry, improvisation, on-camera techniques and auditioning.
    Prerequisite(s): FAA 1510  or permission of instructor.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
  
  •  

    FAA 3620 - Problems in Classical Art

    Credits: 4
    A thematic study of the impact of the classical tradition upon Western art. Specific topics vary from year to year, with an emphasis on the persistence of classicism into the 20th century. Most recently the course has focused upon the nude as a form of art, inherited from ancient Greece, neglected, and then re-formed, and inspiring some of the greatest works of art of the modern world.
    Fulfills: Humanities distribution requirement. AL in LS Core.
  
  •  

    FAA 3650 - The World of Michelangelo

    Credits: 4
    The course will deal with the life, art, and times of Michelangelo: the history of Florence from the age of Lorenzo the Magnificent to the end of the city’s Republican institution and the installment of the hereditary Medici rule; the history of the papacy, its attempts to combat the crisis of faith within the Church, and its struggle with the monarchs of Europe; and with Michelangelo the man, the artist, and the Christian, who in his life sought but was unable to stand apart from the conflicts of his epoch, and in his sculpture, painting and architecture, drawing and poetry, gave expression to these conflicts with a scope and depth equaled by none of his contemporaries. Few were able to escape the power and reach of his influence. His age saw itself through the images that he created for it.
    Fulfills: Humanities distribution requirement. AL in LS Core.
  
  •  

    FAA 3680 - Topics in Modern Art

    Credits: 4
    Introduces specific issues and approaches in the study of modern art. Sample topics include (but are not limited to) Impressionism, Symbolism, Cubism, and Expressionism. Most recently the focus of the course was landscape European and American, with an emphasis on the Hudson River School. By focusing on a specific topic within modern art, the course develops the student’s writing and critical skills through intensive study that is not possible in a survey course.
    Fulfills: AL and X in LS Core
  
  •  

    FAA 3800 - Portfolio Review

    Credits: 0
    This course is for no-credit, but is required coursework for all sophomore-level students in the Graphic Design major. There is no class time. You must submit a portfolio with a required number of projects. Your portfolio must be submitted after you pass the following prerequisite courses with a minimum grade of a 2.0: FAA 2830 Layout Analysis and Construction,FAA 2840 - Image Making and Meaning , and FAA 2860 - Graphic Design I . If you follow the recommended Graphic Design Program of Study you should submit your portfolio during winter break in your sophomore year. The portfolio is a compilation of graphic design work and other studio coursework. The requirements of the portfolio are presented to you at the beginning of each of the prerequisite courses. Your portfolio is graded on a pass/no pass basis. Successful completion is necessary for you to continue in the Graphic Design major. It also provides an assessment of your strengths and weaknesses as you begin your higher-level coursework.
  
  •  

    FAA 3830 - Visual Web Design

    Credits: 4
    The Internet has created another outlet for designers’ creative expression. This course will examine the principles behind effective web design through using Design Thinking and Visual Literacy. Discussions on screen size, communication via the web, legibility and readability, and the use of a Content Management System vs. dedicated software will take place throughout the semester. Students will design and produce websites for personal expression, but institutional and marketing applications will be explored.
    Prerequisite(s): FAA2830 and FAA2840, or permission of the instructor. 
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
  
  •  

    FAA 3840 - 2D Animation

    Credits: 4
    2D animation dominates image-making. In this course students will learn processes of creating and producing short and longer-length animation sequences. Sketching, storyboarding, sound/audio integration, and various animation software techniques will be explored. Learning will be through lecture, hand-on demonstrations, in-class studio work, as well as completion of projects outside of class.
    Prerequisite(s): FAA2830 and FAA2840, or permission of the instructor.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
  
  •  

    FAA 3850 - History of Graphic Design

    Credits: 4
    The history of graphic design begins with pictographs and prehistoric cave paintings and moves forward to the developments in our digital age. This course introduces specific issues and approaches in the study of graphic design. Sample topics include (but are not limited to) the history of type, type/image, image dominance, the role of technology in design, movements such as the Bauhaus, Art Nouveau, Art Deco, Nostaglia, Constructivism, Deconstruction, etc. There will be lectures, discussion, research, writing and oral presentations. This course is required of all Graphic Design majors.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
  
  •  

    FAA 3870 - Graphic Design 2

    Credits: 4
    This course is designed to build conceptualization and critical-thinking skills, as well as continued exploration of typographic design and analysis of design for 2-D and 3-D surfaces and spaces. Thinking conceptually and brainstorming skills will be employed for each project. Further industry knowledge in software techniques will be covered. Projects will be longer in nature resulting in lots of solutions explored before a final solution is revealed. Time management techniques and playful creative processes will be utilized throughout the entire semester. Developing the ability to create visual solutions will include: ideation; creative use of typography; and constructing layered meaning with images and text. Additionally, you will learn professional standards in the design industry; examine the role of a designer; and explore the creative process specific to client need.
    Prerequisite(s): FAA 2860   or permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    FAA 3880 - Graphic Design 3

    Credits: 4
    This course continues the exploration of the techniques and practices of contemporary graphic design that were introduced in previous courses. Conceptual thinking, image development, typographic design, and design systems will be the focus as you develop larger, multi-part projects for print and digital media individually and in groups. The course will be divided into two halves. The first half deals with persuasive concept development through the use of image, sound and movement. Coming up with a “big idea” and integrating it through traditional and social media marketing will be completed. Differences between the development of printed material, screen material and audio will be studied and discussed. The second half of the course will focus on branding. A real client will be employed for this project. All aspects of branding will be conceptualized, designed, and. Both projects will use the process of collaboration. An evaluation of the collaboration experience will be completed after each projects’ implementation.
    Prerequisite(s): FAA 3870 .
  
  •  

    FAA 3890 - UX Design

    Credits: 4
    This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the user experience design process. Lectures and assignments will focus on creating experience for contemporary digital interfaces. Students will apply the concepts and techniques presented through lecture and reading for three distinct projects. Projects will explore user research, the definition of requirements, the design of information architecture, and interactive prototyping. Students will actively create experiences and practice presenting their ideas for iterative evaluation and evolution. Technology skills will be advanced, developing a better understanding of what technological standards are utilzed for the design of digital products. Design history and contemporary business practices will be discussed in reference to each project’s intent. Class time will include short lectures, software demonstrations, and in-class studio work. Students will be expected to work outside of class to complete homework, readings, and projects. 
    Prerequisite(s): FAA2830 and FAA2840, or permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    FAA 3960(W) - Methodologies of Scholarship in the Visual and Performing Arts

    Credits: 4
    This course examines how the disciplines of Art, Art History, and Design are inter-related and engaged with other disciplines. Theoretical and practical models of scholarship- with focused intention on developing a capstone project-are introduced and employed. Art History issues explored include aesthetics, formalism, class, gender and race constructions, literary criticism, post-modern theory, as well as ritual and performance theory. Generally, the material for this course will be presented in a variety of ways, all designed to promote thoughtful discussion. This is a research and writing intensive course, which is designed in part to prepare visual and performing arts majors to produce their senior thesis and do graduate level work. This course is required for all Art and Art History and Graphic Design majors.
    Prerequisite(s): FAA2860, or permission of the instructor.
    Fulfills: W in LS Core
  
  •  

    FAA 4420 - History of Photography

    Credits: 4
    The various forms, uses, styles, and genres of photography will be examined within social, philosophical, and aesthetic dimensions that have evolved in the medium from its beginnings through the 1980s. Students will participate in darkroom laboratory exercises and demonstrations in photochemical production.
    Cross-Listed: COM 4420  
    Fulfills: Humanities distribution requirement. AL in LS Core.
  
  •  

    FAA 4820 - Motion Graphics

    Credits: 4
    Motion Graphics is the art of communication through moving text and graphic elements. Common applications for motion graphics include title sequences, identity design, information design and marketing communication. Through a series of assignments, this class will explore combining animation, video, typography, illustration, photography, and music to communicate ideas and tell compelling stories. Learning will be through lecture, hand-on demonstrations, in- class studio work, as well as completion of projects outside of class.
    Prerequisite(s): FAA2830 and FAA2840, or permission of the instructor.
    Fulfills: Humanities distribution requirement. AL in LS Core.
  
  •  

    FAA 4900 - Directed Study

    Credits: 4
    Qualified students may propose a course of individual study to be conducted under the direction of a member of the Department.
  
  •  

    FAA 4910 - Visual and Perfoming Arts Internship

    Credits: 4
    On or off-campus internship, which involves the student in hands-on-experience in the arts. Under the supervision of a visual and performing arts faculty member, culminating in a field-related project (comprehensive report, a performance, exhibit, etc.) Open to juniors and seniors with consent of their visual and performing arts faculty advisor.
    Prerequisite(s): Major in Art/Art History, Theatre Arts or Graphic Design. FAA 3860 for Graphic Design Majors.
  
  •  

    FAA 4920 - Visual and Perfoming Arts Internship

    Credits: 4
    On or off-campus internship, which involves the student in hands-on-experience in the arts. Under the supervision of a visual and performing arts faculty member, culminating in a field-related project (comprehensive report, a performance, exhibit, etc.) Open to juniors and seniors with consent of their visual and performing arts faculty advisor.
    Prerequisite(s): Open only to Art and Art History, Theater Arts or Graphic Design majors. FAA 3860 for Graphic Design Majors.
  
  •  

    FAA 4950 - Senior Portfolio

    Credits: 4
    This course is meant to be taken in the senior year after all or nearly all of the required studio courses for the Graphic Design major have been completed. Students will prepare a professional quality portfolio, as well as identity elements dealing with business communications as it relates to their field. Additionally, students will prepare their senior capstone project for exhibition in a professional gallery setting learning how to work collaboratively and in the public environs.
    Prerequisite(s): FAA2860, or permission of the instructor.
    Fulfills: X in LS Core
  
  •  

    FAA 4960 - Senior Seminar with Thesis

    Credits: 4
    Topics will be selected appropriate to students’ areas of concentration. Required for all Art and Art History and Design majors. Offered spring semester.

Finance

  
  •  

    FIN 3315 - Corporate Finance

    Credits: 4
    Formerly: Financial Analysis
    This is the foundation finance course that introduces and provides proficiency with the principles of financial management. The method of instruction focuses on lectures, excel modelling, problem solving and case analysis. The course covers resource planning and analysis, financial reporting, and valuation and net present value concepts used for valuing securities, projects, and companies. Topics include risk and return, capital budgeting, financial statement analysis, working capital management, and financial forecasting.
    Prerequisite(s): MTH1003 or (course equivalent MTH1016 or MTH1115 or MTH1217), BUS 2215 .
  
  •  

    FIN 3325 - Investments

    Credits: 4
    This course introduces portfolio theory and examines risk-return trade offs and portfolio diversification. Topics include investment environment, financial systems, institutions, and markets, how securities are traded, security analysis, and equity, fixed income, and derivative valuation. In addition, this course discusses management of bond portfolios. This course includes a security analysis and valuation project.
    Prerequisite(s): FIN 3315 .
  
  •  

    FIN 3500 - Fieldwork in Financial Coaching

    Credits: 4
    Formerly: This course is designed to provide students from all majors with the knowledge, skills, and practical experience necessary to become effective financial coaches. Students intern for a semester at the Financial Capability Center and upon successfully completing the academic, management, and service components of the course, earn a certificate in financial coaching. To be trained as coaches, students participate in faculty-led workshops where they learn personal finance, coaching, and cultural competences. After completing the training, students are matched with clients from our local non-profit partners. Student coaches offer financial capability workshops that provide clients with basic knowledge and skills, and one-on-one coaching sessions that help clients plan a path for realizing their own goals. Student coaches are supported by faculty, staff, counselors from local partners, translators and industry expert volunteers. In addition to providing direct services to clients and peers, team of students support the Center with general management, data management, research, grant writing, outreach and/or marketing functions. Students dedicate between 10-15 hours per week to coaching and center support activities.
    Prerequisite(s): Faculty consent required 
    Note: This course will fulfill a required elective for the following concentration(s):

  
  •  

    FIN 4406 - International Financial Management

    Credits: 4
    This course covers the environment of multinational financial management, international financial markets with emphasis on the foreign exchange market, international flow of funds, relationships between exchange rates and economic variables, as well as hedging techniques and international arbitrage. This course also examines international capital budgeting, short-term financing and investment, and foreign direct investment.
    Prerequisite(s): BUS 2215 .
    Note: This course will fulfill a required elective for the following concentration(s):

  
  •  

    FIN 4431 - Applied Corporate Finance

    Credits: 4
    Formerly: Advanced Finance
    This is an advanced corporate finance course that assumes proficiency with the principles of financial management. Topics covered include enterprise valuation, Initial Public Offers, mergers and acquisitions and corporate governance. The method of instruction focuses on case analysis; the course is based on class discussion, oral presentations, written analysis and computer modelling.
    Prerequisite(s): FIN 3315 .
  
  •  

    FIN 4433 - Portfolio Analysis (Formerly Advanced Investments)

    Credits: 4
    This is an advanced investments course that assumes proficiency with the principles of portfolio management, market efficiency, and asset pricing. The course covers asset classes, equity, fixed income, derivatives and financial markets. The method of delivery focuses on case studies and financial modeling practice.
    Prerequisite(s): FIN 3325  
    Note: This course will fulfill a required elective for the following concentration(s):

  
  •  

    FIN 4435 - Financial Planning I

    Credits: 4
    This course is designed for students interested in pursuing careers in the financial planning profession and for those wishing to learn how to manage their own financial affairs and make wise financial decisions. The course provides students with the knowledge, skills and competence necessary to make and advise on individual financial planning decisions such as risk management and insurance, retirement, tax, education, and large purchase planning. Students will have a solid understanding of the personal financial planning process and the use of quantitative and qualitative tools to measure financial well-being, manage liquidity, debt, & credit, and estimate insurance and retirement needs. Students will also learn communication and counselling strategies and techniques found to be effective in personal and professional interactions. Finally, students will learn insights from the consumer behavior and behavioral finance fields that will help them guide their clients, and their own, financial planning process. 
    Prerequisite(s): FIN 3315  
    Corequisite(s): FIN 3325  
    Note: This course will fulfill a required elective for the following concentration(s):

  
  •  

    FIN 4436 - Financial Planning II

    Credits: 4
    This course has been designed for students that are considering a career in Financial Planning.  The primary areas of focus for this course include (1) Professional Conduct for those engaged in financial planning (2) Tax Planning, (3) Business Financial Planning and (4) Estate Planning. Use of the text will be supplemented with case studies that will give students the chance to apply course concepts to realistic fact patterns.  The course will conclude with a comprehensive case where students will create a financial plan that will address multiple financial objectives and choices. 
    Prerequisite(s): FIN 3325  and FIN 4435  
  
  •  

    FIN 4800 - Directed Study

    Credits: 4
    An independent study course for superior senior students under the direction of a faculty member. Approval must be obtained from the chair and the faculty member involved. This cannot be used to replace required finance electives unless department approval. 
  
  •  

    FIN 4900 - Special Topics in Finance

    Credits: 4
    This course is designed to explore contemporary issues in Finance. The specific topic varies each time the course is taught. Descriptions are available in the Lucey Center for Business Advising. 
    Prerequisite(s): BUS 2215  
    Note: Depending on topic, course will fulfill a required elective for the following concentration(s):


French

  
  •  

    FRE 1110 - Introductory French I

    Credits: 4
    This course is offered for absolute beginners only. This course is not open to heritage speakers or students with any prior study of French. Oral-aural proficiency is acquired through speaking and role playing in class plus audio and visual practice outside of class, including internet drills from the Super Site that accompanies the book. Students learn basic strategies for reading and writing in the language.
    Prerequisite(s): No French classes on high school transcript.
    Fulfills: FL in LS Core
  
  •  

    FRE 1120 - Introductory French II

    Credits: 4
    This course is offered for students with little or no background in French. This course is not open to heritage speakers. Oral-aural proficiency is acquired through speaking and role playing in class plus audio and visual practice outside of class, including internet drills from the Super Site that accompanies the book. Students learn basic strategies for reading and writing in the language.
    Prerequisite(s): Placed at this level by Placement Test or FRE 1110  or permission of the instructor.
    Fulfills: FL in LS Core
  
  •  

    FRE 2010 - Intermediate French I

    Credits: 4
    An intermediate level course with an emphasis on the study of grammar. Readings will consist of short texts from French and Francophone culture, literature, and civilization, along with articles of contemporary relevance.
    Prerequisite(s): Placed at this level by Placement Test or FRE 1120  or equivalent or permission of the instructor.
    Fulfills: The intermediate language sequence (2010, 2020) satisfies BOTH Humanities distribution requirements. FL in LS Core.
  
  •  

    FRE 2020 - Intermediate French II

    Credits: 4
    A continuation of the intermediate course with an emphasis on the study of grammar. Readings will consist of short texts from French and Francophone literature and civilization, along with articles of contemporary relevance.
    Prerequisite(s): Placed at this level by Placement Test or FRE 2010  or equivalent or permission of the instructor.
    Fulfills: The intermediate language sequence (2010, 2020) satisfies BOTH Humanities distribution requirements. FL in LS Core.
  
  •  

    FRE 3010 - Composition & Culture

    Credits: 4
    An advanced study of the most important grammatical structure of French, and practice of these structures in the context of the skill areas of listening, speaking, reading, writing, and cultural competence. Students will also watch short films and will answer questions on the cultural aspects of the films.
    Prerequisite(s): Placed at this level by Placement Test or FRE 2020  or equivalent or consent of the instructor.
    Fulfills: Humanities distribution requirement. FL in LS Core.
  
  •  

    FRE 3020 - Conversation and Culture

    Credits: 4
    This course is focused on the development of students’ confidence in their command of French, and their engagement with a variety of materials drawn from the internet or contemporary media. Through these materials and their own research, students will develop a personal connection to a French-speaking country. Class work will focus around larger topics: society, history, politics, food, music, literature, film, and culture.
    Prerequisite(s): Placed at this level by Placement Test or FRE 2020  or equivalent or consent of the instructor.
    Fulfills: Humanities distribution requirement. FL in LS Core.
  
  •  

    FRE 3030 - Cinema of the French Speaking World

    Credits: 4
    This course is offered for students who wish to study French and Francophone culture and civilization through film. Taught in English.
    Fulfills: Humanities distribution requirement. AL in the LS Core.
  
  •  

    FRE 3040(W) - Five Centuries of French Civilization in Films

    Credits: 4
    This course is offered for students who wish to continue to develop their advanced language skills. There will be a study of French language and culture through films. There will be a selection of five films, each representing a century of French civilization and culture from the 17th century to the present. Students will be reminded of all the important events in history, literature, culture, and art; then, they will discuss how the films illustrate these events. Emphasis will be on building vocabulary, improving conversational and written skills, comprehension, and literary analysis.
    Fulfills: Humanities distribution requirement or the Writing intensive requirement. Fulfills W, D, AL and FL in LS Core
  
  •  

    FRE 3050 - Actualités du monde francophone

    Credits: 4
    This course covers main events in today’s French-speaking world. Students will learn about contemporary French society, its geography, education system, political events, religion and culture. Students will also watch short documentaries in order to know contemporary issues and interests of France and French speaking nations. Appropriate background readings, lectures, and videotaped interviews in French will integrate up-to-the-minute readings with the broad historical, social and cultural backgrounds of the topics in question.
    Prerequisite(s): Placed at this level by Placement Test or FRE 2020  or equivalent or consent of the instructor. Recommended as a cultural course for international business students.
    Fulfills: Humanities distribution requirement. FL in LS Core.
  
  •  

    FRE 3110 - Survey of French Literature I

    Credits: 4
    A chronological survey of French Literature. The first semester covers French literature from the Middle Ages to the 18th century. The second semester covers French literature from the 19th century to the present. An overview of the main currents of French literature through a reading of representative texts of each period will provide a general knowledge of the literary history of France. Oral and written reports. Either semester may be taken independently.
    Prerequisite(s): FRE 3010  or FRE 3020  or equivalent or consent of the instructor.
    Fulfills: Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfill FL or AL in LS Core.
  
  •  

    FRE 3120 - Survey of French Literature II

    Credits: 4
    A chronological survey of French Literature. The first semester covers French literature from the Middle Ages to the 18th century. The second semester covers French literature from the 19th century to the present. An overview of the main currents of French literature through a reading of representative texts of each period will provide a general knowledge of the literary history of France. Oral and written reports. Either semester may be taken independently.
  
  •  

    FRE 3130 - Studies in Modern French & Francophone Literature I

    Credits: 4
    A study of major themes or genres in 20th century French or Francophone literature through a reading of representative texts in the original language. Texts and topics may vary from year to year.
    Prerequisite(s): FRE 3010  or FRE 3020  or equivalent or consent of the instructor. Either semester may be taken independently.
    Fulfills: Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfill AL or FL in LS Core.
  
  •  

    FRE 3140 - Studies in Modern French & Francophone Literature II

    Credits: 4
    A study of major themes or genres in 20th century French or Francophone literature through a reading of representative texts in the original language. Texts and topics may vary from year to year.
  
  •  

    FRE 3510 - France and Its Civilization I

    Credits: 4
    A history of French civilization from its beginning to the present. The course will deal with the geography and history of France; the people, their manners and customs, their political, social and economic life; and their culture as reflected in the arts, sciences, philosophy, literature, music and education.
    Prerequisite(s): FRE 3010  or FRE 3020  or equivalent or consent of the instructor. Either semester may be taken independently.
    Fulfills: Humanities distribution requirement. Fulfills FL and H in LS Core.
  
  •  

    FRE 3520 - France and Its Civilization II

    Credits: 4
    A history of French civilization from its beginning to the present. The course will deal with the geography and history of France; the people, their manners and customs, their political, social and economic life; and their culture as reflected in the arts, sciences, philosophy, literature, music and education.
  
  •  

    FRE 4900 - Directed Independent Study

    Credits: 4
    Intensive program of reading/writing under the direction of a full time member of the department. Provides exceptionally qualified WLCS seniors and second-semester juniors with an opportunity to work in depth on a focused topic not covered by the usual departmental course offerings. Requires a formal detailed proposal approved by the faculty members and the department chair.
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of at least one language course at the 3000 level, at least three additional courses in the major, a minimum GPA of 3.0 in the major, or permission of the instructor, in addition to the approval of the chair and consent of the members of the department under whose supervision the Directed Study will be conducted.

First Year Experience

  
  •  

    FYE 1000 - First Year Experience

    Credits: 0
    College is a time for self-exploration, active engagement and understanding of the world. The purpose of the FYE course is to facilitate a positive transitional experience and establish a culture of self-advocacy. Through active engagement and reflective decision making, students will develop a foundation for academic, professional, social and personal success. Class will meet weekly for 75 minutes until the week prior to Thanksgiving. Classes will be co-taught by faculty/staff instructors and upper-class student mentors.
  
  •  

    FYE 1050 - First Year Experience - Exploration

    Credits: 1
    College is a time for self-exploration, active engagement and understanding of the world.  The purpose of this course is to facilitate a positive transitional experience and establish a culture of self-advocacy.  Through active engagement and reflective decision making students will develop a foundation for academic, professional, social and personal success.  In addition to the traditional FYE curriculum, this course will introduce a variety of academic topics and their integral role in our current society.  This course will allow first-year students to dive deeply into an active and hands-on learning experience early in their academic career to get them excited about college-level learning.  The approach will also serve as an engaging preview for the types of immersive, learning-by doing opportunities that typically don’t come about until students reach their junior or senior years.  Thus, giving every student an experiential learning experience in their first semester.  

First Year Writing

  
  •  

    FYW 1050 - Introduction to College Writing

    Credits: 4
    Introduction to the rhetorical practices of college-level writing. Emphasizes the interaction of writer, audience, language, purpose, and situation. Fosters an understanding of the ways in which writing, thinking, and learning are related. Sections limited to 18 students each. Intensive concentration during the semester on the student’s own writing examined in class and in conference with the instructor.
    Fulfills: FYW in LS Core. Does not count toward English major or minor.

General Engineering

  
  •  

    GEN 1001 - Introduction to Engineering

    Credits: 4
    This course provides freshman engineering students with the communication skills needed in college and throughout their careers, and introduces them to the profession of engineering. Computer skills, report generation, public speaking, leadership and teamwork skills, and computer-aided drawing are covered. Design is emphasized throughout.
  
  •  

    GEN 2010 - Mechanics I

    Credits: 4
    Study of force systems in two and three dimensions. Equilibrium analysis of rigid bodies and simple structures, shear and moment diagrams, centroids, moments of inertia, friction.
    Corequisite(s): PHY 2211 .
  
  •  

    GEN 2012 - Mechanics II

    Credits: 4
    Study of the fundamental mechanics of how materials behave when subjected to loadings. The concept of stress and strain at a point. Stress-temperature relationships. Force and deformation analyses of bodies under axial, shearing, bending, torsional, and combined loadings. Euler columns.
    Prerequisite(s): GEN 2010  (with a C- or better), MTH 1218 .
  
  •  

    GEN 2060 - Environmental Geology: Resources

    Credits: 4
    An introduction to the relationship between humans and the geological environment with a focus on natural resources, waste disposal, and climate change.
    Fulfills: STEM requirement in LS Core
  
  •  

    GEN 3040 - Fluid Mechanics

    Credits: 4
    Fluid statics, principles of one-dimensional incompressible flow, derivation and applications of the continuity, energy, momentum equations. Viscous flow, flow in pipe lines and open channels. Fluid measurements and dimensional analysis.
    Corequisite(s): GEN 2012  and MTH 2219 .

Human Development

  
  •  

    HDE 1000 - Introduction to Human Development

    Credits: 4
    This course focuses on physical, cognitive, and social-emotional continuity and changes that occur throughout the lifespan. An introduction to research and theories in human development is included.
  
  •  

    HDE 2000W - Research Methods & Applied Statistics in Human Development

    Credits: 4
    This is an undergraduate level course for students majoring in Human Development. As an introductory course, it is designed to expose students to the theoretical and philosophical foundations of the scientific method and the practice of research as it is conducted within the discipline of Human Development. The specific aims of this course are to guide students through the skills needed to develop a research project, to present that project in a written proposal, and to choose the appropriate analytic tools to analyze and interpret data for both an academic and a lay audience.
    Fulfills: W and Q in LS Core
  
  •  

    HDE 2140 - Life Span Development

    Credits: 4
    This course focuses on the physical, cognitive, and psychosocial domains of human development and changes that occur through the normal life lifespan. Students will study factors that influence development such as cultural norms, family structure, education, socioeconomic status, wellness, geographical and housing location, and social/institutional structures. An introduction to current research and theories used to explain human growth and change is explored.
  
  •  

    HDE 4850 - Human Development Capstone: Field Experience

    Credits: 4
    The Human Development Capstone Field Experience course offers students who major in Human Development with an opportunity to do a field experience. The course provides students a unique opportunity to explore, first hand, possible career interests, to learn from professionals working in the field, and to make a contribution to the community through service learning. In addition, field experiences help students connect theory and practice. Students in this course will select from a range of possible supervised field work opportunities within community, school, human services, and mental health-related agencies. As part of their field experience, students receive direct professional supervision, valuable hands-on experience, and earn four credits toward graduation. Students are required to complete between 10 - 12 hours per week at their placement site. In addition to their time at the agency, students will be expected to write a weekly reflection on their experience and attend a bi-weekly seminar to discuss field experience with other students also in the course. Placements will be arranged through the School of Education and Social Policy, Director of Community Partnerships. Students will arrange work schedule and specific responsibilities with the site supervisor at their placement. There will be a signed agreement between the student, the college, and the site. As stated above, in addition to the field responsibilities, the academic component of the course requires that the student complete a weekly reflection and attend a bi-weekly seminar on campus where students will discuss their field experiences and the connection of practice and theory in the field of human development. The course grade is based on an evaluation of student performance in the field as well as a written reflective analysis.
    Prerequisite(s): junior or senior status.
  
  •  

    HDE 4851 - Human Development Capstone: Field Experience

    Credits: 8
    The Human Development Capstone Field Experience course offers students who major in Human Development with an opportunity to do a field experience. The course provides students a unique opportunity to explore, first hand, possible career interests, to learn from professionals working in the field, and to make a contribution to the community through service learning. In addition, field experiences help students connect theory and practice. Students in this course will select from a range of possible supervised field work opportunities within community, school, human services, and mental health-related agencies. As part of their field experience, students receive direct professional supervision, valuable hands-on experience, and earn four credits toward graduation. Students are required to complete between 22 - 24 hours per week at their placement site. In addition to their time at the agency, students will be expected to write a weekly reflection on their experience and attend a bi-weekly seminar to discuss field experience with other students also in the course. Placements will be arranged through the School of Education and Social Policy, Director of Community Partnerships. Students will arrange work schedule and specific responsibilities with the site supervisor at their placement. There will be a signed agreement between the student, the college, and the site. As stated above, in addition to the field responsibilities, the academic component of the course requires that the student complete a weekly reflection and attend a bi-weekly seminar on campus where students will discuss their field experiences and the connection of practice and theory in the field of human development. The course grade is based on an evaluation of student performance in the field as well as a written reflective analysis.
    Prerequisite(s): junior or senior status.

History

  
  •  

    HIS 1106 - U.S. History I: From Pre-Contact through the Civil War and Reconstruction

    Credits: 4
    This course offers an introduction to American history from the beginning of European expansion through the Civil War and Reconstruction. Drawing upon the methods and insights of social, political, and cultural history, the class lectures and discussions will explore a range of topics, including: the colonial encounter, labor systems, racial formation, the movement for independence and the formation of the American Republic, religion and reform movements, the democratic and market Revolutions, the transformation of gender roles, and the causes and consequences of the Civil War and Reconstruction.
    Fulfills: H in LS Core
  
  •  

    HIS 1107 - U.S. History II: From Reconstruction to the Present

    Credits: 4
    This course examines the major events, themes, figures, and eras of the history of the United States since the Civil War. Political, social, and economic history are integrated in order to provide students with an opportunity to appreciate the multicultural heritage of the United States, as well as the global forces that have shaped the history of the country. Students are also introduced to the craft of the historian.
    Fulfills: H in LS Core
  
  •  

    HIS 1119 - The European Experience: Antiquity to the Reformation

    Credits: 4
    This course examines the major events and developments in European history from ancient civilizations through the Renaissance and Reformation, with particular emphasis upon the political context, the causes and implications of social and economic change, and cultural evolution. This course is not open to History Majors who have received credit for HIS 1130 .
    Fulfills: H in LS Core
 

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10