Aug 18, 2019  
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Accounting

  
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    ACC 3303 - Intermediate Accounting I

    Credits: 4
    The Intermediate Accounting course sequence constitutes the “keystone” of the accounting curriculum for accounting concentrates. The central theme of the Intermediate Accounting course sequence is financial accounting and the generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) by which it is governed. The objective of the course sequence is to allow the students to develop a sophisticated comprehension of GAAP, the related theory underlying these GAAP and the corresponding practices, procedures and techniques employed in their application. Intermediate Accounting I concentrates on their application to economic resources (assets).
    Prerequisite(s): BUS 2203  and MTH 1003  (or course equivalent: MTH 1016 , MTH 1115 , or MTH 1217 ).
    Note: This course will fulfill a required elective for the following concentration(s):

  
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    ACC 3304 - Intermediate Accounting II

    Credits: 4
    The second course in the Intermediate Accounting sequence. The central theme of the course is financial accounting and the generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) by which it is governed. The objective of the course is to allow students to develop a sophisticated comprehension of GAAP, its underlying theories, and corresponding practices, procedures, and techniques employed in their application. Intermediate Accounting II concentrates on student application to sources of economic resources (liabilities and equity).
    Prerequisite(s): ACC 3303 .
  
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    ACC 3308 - Cost Accounting

    Credits: 4
    An examination of the manufacturing function from the view of the cost accountant. Managerial control of the elements of product costs will be studied with an emphasis on cost accumulation systems, both historical and estimated. Topics covered will include standard (estimated) costs, variance analysis, profit planning, cost-volume-profit analysis, and relevant cost analysis for problem solving.
    Prerequisite(s): BUS 2203  and MTH 1003  (or course equivalent: MTH 1016 , MTH 1115 , or MTH 1217 ).
  
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    ACC 4406 - Advanced Accounting

    Credits: 4
    This course examines and analyzes complex accounting topics not previously covered in Intermediate Accounting. Topics covered include: organization, structure, aims and process used by the FASB; basics of consolidated financial statements; current value accounting; accounting for not-for-profit organizations; governmental accounting; and other topics current in the field of accounting.
    Prerequisite(s): ACC 3303 .
  
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    ACC 4407 - Taxes

    Credits: 4
    This course covers federal income taxation concepts and principles primarily for individuals and corporations. Income recognition, deductions, tax calculations, capital gains and losses and tax accounting methods are discussed for various tax reporting entities. Tax differences between corporations, individuals and flow-through entities are covered.
    Prerequisite(s): BUS 2203  and MTH 1003  (or course equivalent: MTH 1016 , MTH 1115 , or MTH 1217 ).
  
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    ACC 4408 - Auditing

    Credits: 4
    This course provides a strong conceptual and practical approach to auditing. Emphasis is placed on auditing theory, supplemented with practice work papers and discussions with selected representatives of the accounting profession.
    Prerequisite(s): BUS 2203  and MTH 1003  (or course equivalent: MTH 1016 , MTH 1115 , or MTH 1217 ).
    Fulfills: X in LS Core.
  
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    ACC 4800 - Directed Study

    Credits: 4
    An independent study course for superior senior students under the direction of a faculty member. Approval must be obtained from the chair and the faculty member involved.

Astronomy

  
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    AST 1101 - Introduction to Astronomy

    Credits: 4
    An introduction to modern astronomy. Topics include astronomical observation techniques and instrumentation, stellar evolution, galaxies, modern cosmological theories, the solar system, cosmic origins and the search for extraterrestrial intelligence.
    Fulfills: Mathematics/Science distribution requirement. STEM requirement in LS Core.
    Three hours of lecture plus one two- hour laboratory period a week. Some of these periods are during the evening.
    Note: May also be offered through the Honors program.

Biology

  
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    BIO 1025 - Introduction to Biological Science I

    Credits: 4
    An introduction to biological principles of cell and molecular biology. This course is for science majors. Key topics include cell structure and function, energy transduction, the flow of genetic information, cellular reproduction, and intracellular and intercellular communication. Laboratory investigations are integrated with the lecture material and introduce students to the theory and practice of the scientific method and the application of basic techniques in cell and molecular biology.
    Corequisite(s): BIO1025L
    Fulfills: STEM requirement in the LS Core.
    3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab
    Note: All non-Biology and non-Biochemistry students should take BIO 1025. BIO 1025 will be considered equivalent to BIO 1027 for Biology majors who take BIO 1025 after their first year. BIO 1025 will also be considered equivalent to BIO 1027 for students who are re-taking BIO 1027. Students who take BIO 1025 before declaring a Biology major, will receive credit for the course as equivalent to BIO 1027.
  
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    BIO 1027 - Principles of Biology I

    Credits: 4


    The Unity and Diversity of Life: Molecules, Cells, and Organisms. An introduction to biological principles at the cellular and molecular level. Central topics include cell structure and function, energy transduction, the flow of genetic information, cellular reproduction, and intracellular and intercellular communication. Laboratory investigations supplement the lecture material and introduce students to the theory and practice of the scientific method and the application of basic techniques in cell and molecular biology. Reserved for Biology and Biochemistry majors and minors only.
    Corequisite(s): BIO1027L
    Fulfills: STEM requirement in LS Core.
    3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab
    Note: Biology and biochemistry majors and minors only

    All non-Biology and non-Biochemistry students should take BIO 1025. BIO 1025 will be considered equivalent to BIO 1027 for Biology majors who take BIO 1025 after their first year. BIO 1025 will also be considered equivalent to BIO 1027 for students who are re-taking BIO 1027. Students who take BIO 1025 before declaring a Biology major, will receive credit for the course as equivalent to BIO 1027 toward the major.

  
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    BIO 1028 - Principles of Biology II

    Credits: 4
    The Unity and Diversity of Life: Organisms, Ecology and Evolution. An introduction to biological principles centered on organisms, adaptation and evolution. The course will focus on the process of evolution and the diversity of higher organisms. The course will explore how and why all living organisms must deal with the transmission of information, with the capture and expenditure of energy, with transport of materials, and with self-regulation. Animal behavior will also be considered. The course will have an integrated lecture and laboratory and will stress the relationships between organismal adaptation, form, function, ecological relationships and evolution.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 1027  or BIO1025 or consent of instructor.
    Corequisite(s): BIO1028L
    Fulfills: STEM requirement in LS Core.
    3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab
  
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    BIO 1106 - Human Biology

    Credits: 4


    An introduction to the structure and function of human body at the level of cells, tissues organs and organ systems. A special emphasis is placed on the functions of the nervous and endocrine systems and their role in homeostasis and the integration and regulation of the functions of the other tissues and organs. The course will also consider molecular, Mendelian and population genetics. This course is designed primarily for students who intend to major or are majoring in Psychology or Human Development.
    Fulfills: STEM requirement in LS Core.
    Note: Reserved for students majoring in Psychology or Human Development.

    Not open to biology or health sciences majors or minors.

  
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    BIO 2009 - Environmental Science

    Credits: 4
    The course engages students to inquire the linkages between ecological systems, human systems and human perturbations of natural ecological systems. Emphasis is placed on applied environmental issues that currently confront the planet. Students will also discuss the process of biological/ecological inquiry and the nature of science. This course will acquaint students with some of the social, economic, political, and ethical aspects of environmental problems following an introduction to the basic principles of ecology - the study of the interactions among organisms and their physical environment. The future of our society depends on whether Homo sapiens can learn to live in harmony with the global ecosystem so that it can support civilization. Knowing how the world ecosystem works permits more than knowledgeable participation in the great decisions of our day. Consideration will be given to alternative ways of organizing our society in accordance with sound ecological principles.
    Fulfills: STEM in LS Core
    Four hours a week with some field/laboratory work.
    Note: This course does not count toward the Biology Majors or Minor.
  
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    BIO 2010 - Ecology

    Credits: 4
    An introduction to ecological concepts and their applications including interrelated scientific principles, both abiotic and biological. In addition to a core grounding in ecological concepts, the class will look at major environmental perturbations and the complexity of interrelations inherent in dealing with human use and alteration of ecosystems. Students will focus on the quantitative comparison of different ecological communities and ecosystems and learn quantitative sampling and analysis. The laboratory will consist of field excursions and exercises related to the field experience and ecological techniques.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 1028  or BIO 2009, or consent of instructor.
    Corequisite(s): BIO2010L
    3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab
  
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    BIO 2018 - Genetics

    Credits: 4
    The concepts of genetics permeate all sub-disciplines within biology, from medicine to ecology. Increasingly, a solid understanding of the principles of molecular and classical genetics have become necessary in the formation of public policy and legal affairs, as well as in the biotechnology, forensic, agricultural, healthcare and fitness industries. This course stresses a thorough understanding of the structure and function of the genetic material, how genotype dictates phenotype via the regulation of gene expression, how proteins are made, how mutations occur and are repaired, the basics of recombinant DNA technology, how genes get fixed in populations and the genetic basis of evolution. The laboratory will introduce the basic skills and stress the theoretical basis of modern molecular genetic techniques utilized in recombinant DNA technology, ecological and population biology, informatics and forensics.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 1027  or BIO1025, CHM 1110  or CHM1210, or consent of the instructor.
    Corequisite(s): BIO 2108L
    3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab
  
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    BIO 3012 - Immunology

    Credits: 4
    An overview of the fundamental principles of immunology. These include a study of the cellular and genetic characteristics of the immune system; the structure, function, and physical properties of antigens, antibodies, and complement; the humoral and cell mediated immune responses; and the etiology, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of immunological diseases that impact individual and community health. Laboratory investigations supplement the lecture material and provide an introduction to current methods and techniques in clinical immunology.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 1027  or BIO 1025, BIO 1028 BIO 2018  or consent of instructor.
    Corequisite(s): BIO1027L
    3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab
  
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    BIO 3018 - Human Genetics and Personalized Medicine

    Credits: 4
    The newest revolution in healthcare is personalized medicine - using the genetic information in an individual tumor or entire human genome to design specific, individualized treatment plans.  This course will begin with a foundation of basic concepts and practices in human genetics and genomics, followed by a survey of genetic defects and the therapies that have been designed to treat them, and finally the application of DNA sequencing to tailored therapies for cancers and other genetic diseases in individual patients.  The laboratory will be project based and incorporate standard and cutting edge laboratory techniques to manipulate genomes similar to how gene therapy might be carried out using CRISPR-Cas9. 
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 1027 or  BIO 1025, BIO 2018
    6 hrs combined lecture and laboratory
  
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    BIO 3030 - Cancer Biology

    Credits: 4
    This course offers a combination of historical, medical, and biological perspectives of cancer, with an emphasis on examining the cellular and molecular bases of the disease(s). Laboratory investigations supplement the lecture material and provide an introduction to a variety of experimental methods and techniques that are used to understand the biology of cancer and to explore current and potential treatment strategies.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO1027 or BIO 1025,  and BIO2018.
    Combined 6 hours lecture and lab
  
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    BIO 3031 - Embryonic Development

    Credits: 4
    Countless remarkable transformations and events occur in the transition from egg, to embryo, to adult. Examples from human and model systems will be used to illustrate the cellular and genetic principles that govern embryonic development. Neurobiology topics will be highlighted. Nerve cells born in the developing brain and spinal cord live for the entire life span of the organism. Neural connections are established with muscles and other organ systems throughout embryonic development. Discussion topics will include stem cell and human embryo research, prenatal testing, infertility and assisted reproduction, therapeutic and reproductive cloning, and “when does human life begin?”, neural tube patterning, brain development, neural crest cell migration and differentiation, spinal cord repair and emergent therapies for degenerative neurological disorders such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. In the laboratory students will culture nerve and neural crest cells for original experimentation.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 1027  or BIO 1025, BIO 2018  or consent of the instructor.
    Combined 6 hours lecture and lab
  
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    BIO 3037 - Cellular Biochemistry

    Credits: 4
    A study of the properties, structures, and function of three major classes of biomolecules: proteins, carbohydrates and lipids; a comprehensive survey of carbohydrate metabolism, with emphasis on the integration and control of metabolic pathways. Laboratory investigations supplement the lecture material and provide an introduction to current methods and techniques in cellular biochemistry.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 1027  or BIO 1025, CHM 1110 , and CHM 1120  or CHM 2210.
    Corequisite(s): BIO3037L
    3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab
  
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    BIO 3038 - Molecular Biology and Biotechnology

    Credits: 4
    DNA makes RNA makes protein. This project based course combines lecture and laboratory into one integrated experience that covers the processes that revolutionized the study of biology and medicine. The scientific discoveries that shaped the biotechnology industry will be covered as we learn the cutting edge techniques currently used in academic laboratories, industry and medicine. Students will learn the fundamental theories of molecular genetics underpinning the practice of modern biotechnology while participating in an original research project.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 1027  or BIO1025, BIO 2018   or consent of instructor.
    6 hours combined lecture and lab
  
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    BIO 3040 - Cell Biology

    Credits: 4
    The goal of this course is to gain a working knowledge of the molecular mechanisms responsible for cell growth, death, differentiation, motility, communication, and homeostasis. Specific topics include macromolecular synthesis, cytoskeleton and motor proteins, the regulation of gene expression, signal transduction, membrane transport, protein secretion, membrane sorting, the cell cycle and cancer. Active learning is stressed in both the lecture and the laboratory. The lecture includes classroom discussions of textbook materials, along with student-led presentations/discussions of original research articles on topics of their own choosing related to course subject matter. Emphasis is placed upon the understanding of concepts, methodologies, and interpretation of data. In the laboratory, the students work in small groups to (1) culture both osteoclast cell lines and primary cells, and then treat these cells with hormones to bring about their differentiation in vitro; (2) use high density DNA microarray chip data and bioinformatics to analyze osteoclast gene expression; (3) transfect osteoclasts with siRNA; (4) assess osteoclast differentiation; and (5) individually write a research paper about their results.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 1027  or BIO1025, BIO 1028 BIO 2018  or consent of instructor.
    Corequisite(s): BIO 3040L
    3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab
  
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    BIO 3045 - Microbiology

    Credits: 4
    Formerly: BIO 3303
    This course is an exploration of the microbial world intended for Biology and related majors, with an emphasis on prokaryotic microbes. Microbial structure, genetics, evolution, and biochemical diversity will be covered with the goal of understanding how microorganisms survive in a wide range of environments, how they are related, and how they interact with other organisms. The centrality of microbial life to the health of the planet as well as in human health and disease will be considered. The laboratory component will focus on the development of aseptic technique, isolation and cultivation of microorganisms, and microscopy. Students will use a combination of classical and modern molecular approaches to identify and characterize bacteria isolated from animal and environmental sources.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO1027 or BIO1025, BIO 1028, BIO 2010, BIO2018 or consent of the instructor.
    Corequisite(s): BIO 3045L
    3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab
    Note: This course satisfies prerequisite requirements for health professional graduate programs (i.e. dental, physician assistant, nursing, veterinary).
  
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    BIO 3050 - Comparative Anatomy and Physiology I

    Credits: 4
    A study of the evolution and mechanisms of animal body functions from genes to organ systems to the whole organism interacting with its environment. Course goals include fostering greater appreciation for the universal functions and principles shared by all animals while also considering the diversity of form & function (i.e., understanding the key differences across animal phyla, classes, orders, etc., with particular emphasis on vertebrates). Focus is placed largely on animal nervous and endocrine systems as mechanisms of regulating physiologic function relative to environmental needs, and compared to that of human beings. Laboratory will consist of comparative anatomical dissections, physiological experimentation, and critical reviews (writing and discussion) of scientific literature relevant to the discipline.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 1027  or BIO 1025, BIO 1028 , or consent of instructor.
    Corequisite(s): BIO 3050L
    3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab
  
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    BIO 3051 - Comparative Anatomy and Physiology II

    Credits: 4
    Students develop a working knowledge of the comparative structure and function of the animal body. In class, students compare how different animal groups carry out muscle function, circulation, respiration, digestion, excretion, reproduction, and fluid, energy and thermal balance. In laboratory, students utilize a combination of classroom discussions, anatomical models, palpation (surface anatomy), nerve/muscle associations, dissections of preserved material, computer software, musculoskeletal analysis of movements, and limited human cadaver examination to become proficient in structure/function relationships including medical perspectives.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 1027  or BIO 1025, BIO 1028  or consent of instructor.
    Corequisite(s): BIO 3051L
    3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab
  
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    BIO 3060 - Plant Biology

    Credits: 4
    This course will study plant cell tissue and organ structure, vegetative and reproductive growth and development, photosynthesis and respiration, transport and translocation of water and nutrients, plants interaction with other organisms with the goal of better understanding of plants and their application in agricultural, environmental and medicinal researches. The laboratory component will provide an opportunity for students to have hands on experience and observe different parts of plants, study plant physiological parameters and learn classical and modern techniques that are used to assess plant biological and physiological parameters (e.g. using a spectrophotometer to determine plants components). This is a sophomore level course that may also be counted as an upper level biology elective. This course is recommended for Biology, Environmental Science and related majors.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 1027, BIO 1025, or BIO 1028
    Corequisite(s): BIO 3060L
    3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab
    Note: This is a sophomore level course that may be taken before BIO 2010, which can be deferred to the junior year. It is counted as an upper level biology elective. This course is recommended for Biology, Environmental Science and related majors. 
  
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    BIO 3061 - Plant Physiology

    Credits: 4
    This course offers fundamental information about plant physiology focussing on nutrient uptake and translocation, plant metabolism, physiological responses to biotic and abiotic stresses, hormones and signal transduction, defense and immune responses. The laboratory component will provide an opportunity for students to have hands on experience and assess physiological responses such as antioxidative metabolites and enzymes, secondary metabolites, hormones and nutrient deficiency. This course is recommended for Biology, Environmental Science and related majors.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 1028  or BIO 2010  
    Corequisite(s): Co-requisite BIO3061L
    3 hr lecture, 3 hr lab
    Note: This course is a prerequisite for upper level plant biology courses (i.e. phytoremediation and natural medicines).
  
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    BIO 3063 - Animal Behavior

    Credits: 4
    A study of the development, physiology, genetics, ecology and evolution of animal behavior, with particular emphasis on evolution. The course first introduces the mechanisms responsible for the expression of behavior in animals: the genes, hormones, neurons and muscles that create behavior in an animal. We then examine the evolutionary basis of behavior addressing such topics as foraging strategies, predator-prey interactions, mating systems, sexual selection, aggression, kinship, habitat selection, communication, and human behavior, among others. Laboratory will involve both field and lab work introducing students to (1) observation and description of animal behavior; (2) construction of hypotheses in behavioral ecology and derivation of testable predictions; (3) collection of behavioral data; (4) quantitative & statistical analysis of those data; and (5) interpretation and presentation of findings in written and oral forms. Lab will also include critical reviews (writing and discussion) of scientific literature relevant to the discipline.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 1027  or BIO 1025, BIO 1028 , or consent of instructor.
    Corequisite(s): BIO3063L
    3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab
  
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    BIO 3064 - Marine Biology

    Credits: 4
    A study of life and processes in the marine environment. The course stresses an ecological approach to the study of marine organisms, their adaptations, habitats, physiology and behavior, with emphasis on the importance of marine ecosystems to terrestrial ecosystems and to humankind. Special emphasis will be placed on biodiversity and conservation of ocean ecosystems as well as human impacts on the sea (fisheries, pollution, eutrophication, global climate change, environmental impacts of industrial activities and human populations, among other topics). Laboratories will include comparative anatomy and physiology of marine animals, site visits and field work.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 1027 , BIO 1028 , BIO 2010 , or consent of instructor.
    Corequisite(s): BIO 3064L
    3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab
  
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    BIO 3071 - Conservation and Restoration Biology

    Credits: 4
    This course will address the impacts of humans on Earth’s biodiversity and ecosystems, and strategies taken to conserve, protect and restore global natural resources. This course will center on issues that are paramount to conservation and restoration of species and ecological systems. Topics covered will include global patterns of biodiversity, habitat exploitation and restoration, genetics of small populations, landscape ecology, design of nature reserves, problems associated with invasive species and Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Laboratory periods include a combination of laboratory work, GIS, site visits and field work. Local and regional policies affecting the conservation and restoration of biodiversity will also be included in the course.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 1027  or BIO 1025, BIO 1028 , BIO 2010 , or consent of instructor.
    Corequisite(s): BIO3071L
    3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab
  
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    BIO 3072 - Evolution

    Credits: 4
    This course stresses the relevance of evolution to all of biology and to real world problems. We discuss evolution not as a collection of facts, but as an ongoing research effort with the goal of understanding evolution as an observable process, especially as it relates to modern medicine and the treatment of disease. Emphasis is placed on the theoretical underpinnings of modern evolutionary biology (mutation, selection, migration, & drift) that produce evolutionary change. Additionally, students are introduced to a variety of analytical and technical skills used for studying evolution. Topics covered include population genetics, the theory of evolution by natural selection, concepts of fitness and adaptation, genetic and developmental bases of evolutionary change, modes of speciation, molecular evolution, principles of systematic biology, paleontology and macroevolutionary trends in evolution, the origins of life, and extinction, among others. We hope that exposure to the tremendous diversity within this discipline will illustrate why evolution is viewed as the central theme unifying all of biology. Laboratory will consist of critical reviews (writing and discussion) of scientific literature as relevant to the discipline.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 1027 , BIO 1028 , BIO 2010 , BIO 2018  or consent of instructor.
    6 hours combined lecture and lab
  
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    BIO 3075 - Aquatic and Coastal Zone Ecology

    Credits: 4
    This course focuses on understanding the physical, chemical, and biological properties of freshwater lakes, streams and wetlands as well as estuarine systems and salt marshes. Students will learn how concepts, ecological theory and methods can be integrated to address applied problems in aquatic and coastal zone ecology. This course assumes a basic background in biology, chemistry, math and physics. The approach will include a mix of theory (including a variety of mathematical, verbal, and graphical models of important ecological processes), and field and lab techniques. Students will also learn about how the science is done by looking at examples of research in course readings, examples in lecture, guest lecturers and by reading published research. The course investigates the relationships between habitats, applied ecology, climate, hydrology, watersheds and all types of human activities that affect aquatic ecosystems (e.g. urban development, coastal development, tourism, fisheries, protected areas, aquaculture and agriculture).
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 1027 , BIO 1028 , BIO 2010  or consent of instructor.
    Corequisite(s): BIO3075L
    3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab
  
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    BIO 3090 - Global Field Studies Program

    Credits: 4
    Each course offered in the Global Field Studies Program is an intensive experiential learning opportunity involving a lecture/classroom component and field work in environmentally significant locations around the world. Different ecosystems are studied and compared, and every course focuses on the natural history of the particular location both from an integrated biological perspective [zoology, botany, ecology, biogeography, microbiology and evolution], as well as consideration of the human and cultural aspects of the region. Students develop an awareness and appreciation for both biological and cultural diversity and complexity. There is an additional fee for travel. Open to majors and non-majors. (Students may enroll in more than one field studies course, using a different course number for each.)
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor.
    Fulfills: X in LS Core
    Note: There is an additional fee for travel. Open to majors and non-majors.
  
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    BIO 4081 - Special Topics Seminar in Biology

    Credits: 4
    An investigation of a selected topic of interest in biology, with an emphasis on reading and discussion of the primary scientific literature. Students will learn to critically read the current literature in biology, to analyze and interpret data and to present their analyses of these works to the seminar group. Library reference work and practice in the preparation of written reports will be included.
    Prerequisite(s): Junior/senior standing.
  
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    BIO 4092 - Directed Study/Research I

    Credits: 4
    Intensive laboratory or field research experience in a selected area of biology, which includes reading and analysis of the primary literature, the development of a written report, and presentation of research results.
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of faculty instructor.
    Fulfills: X in LS Core
    Note: A limit of one semester of either Internship (BIO 4095) or Directed Study/Research I or II (BIO 4092, or BIO 4096) may fulfill an upper level elective requirement for the major.
  
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    BIO 4095 - Biology Internship

    Credits: 4


    The Biology Internship is an intensive work/study experience co-supervised by the Internship Coordinator in the Department of Biology at Merrimack College and a designated mentor in the workplace.  Students are placed according to their interest in a variety of public, private or non-profit work settings, including: biomedical, pharmaceutical and/or biotechnology laboratories and facilities; medical, veterinary and/or dental clinics; and environmental and ecological positions.  Requirements include 100-150 supervised hours, a work log, a reflective paper and a capstone presentation.  Advanced planning is required to obtain the necessary permissions.
    Prerequisite(s): Junior or Senior standing as a Biology Major and consent of the Internship Coordinator (Dr. Mark Birnbaum).
    Fulfills: X in LS Core
    Note: Advanced planning is required to obtain the necessary permissions.

    A limit of one semester of either Internship (BIO 4095) or Directed Study/Research I or II (BIO 4092, or BIO 4096) may fulfill an upper level elective requirement for the major.

  
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    BIO 4096 - Directed Study/Research II

    Credits: 4
    Intensive laboratory or field research experience in a selected area of biology, which includes reading and analysis of the primary literature, the development of a written research report, and presentation of research results.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 4092  and permission of faculty instructor.
    Fulfills: X in LS Core
    Note: A limit of one semester of either Internship (BIO 4095) or Directed Study/Research I or II (BIO 4092, or BIO 4096) may fulfill an upper level elective requirement for the major.

Business

  
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    BUS 1100 - Introduction to Business

    Credits: 4
    Primarily for freshmen, the course provides students with an integrative approach to learning the functional areas of business while emphasizing oral and written communication and effective group interaction. Students will learn various technical, organizational and operational aspects of business through active learning opportunities, case discussions, technological applications, and outside activities.
  
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    BUS 1500 - Doing Business in Latin America

    Credits: 4
    The aim of this course is to introduce students to business terminology, concepts, and current issues. This course helps students to develop critical and analytical thinking, and to refine their business decision-making skills. To achieve this, this course uses the Latin American setting. In doing so, the course provides students with a comprehensive overview of the business environment of this emerging, dynamic region. Students cannot take course in place of BUS 1100 .
    Note: Note: This course will fulfill a required elective for the following concentration(s):

  
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    BUS 2203 - Accounting for Business

    Credits: 4
    A computer and project based course designed to develop the students’ ability to read and interpret internal and external financial reports, understand their underlying concepts, use their information in making informed decisions, and understand the effects of management decisions on these reports and the financial performance of the business. Topics include the basic concepts of the accounting process, preparation of the financial statements, analysis and application of the generally accepted accounting principles used to account for the various elements of the balance sheet and income statement, accounting for manufacturing operations, cost-volume-profit analysis, relevant costing, budgeting, and financial statement analysis.
    Prerequisite(s): BUS 1100 .
  
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    BUS 2205 - Principles of Marketing

    Credits: 4
    The marketing course introduces marketing as a functional area of a business enterprise. You will study numerous marketing concepts and functions, including the marketing concept, the marketing mix, buyer behavior, market segmentation, product position, and marketing research, all within a global context.
    Prerequisite(s): BUS 1100 .
  
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    BUS 2210 - Management Information Systems

    Credits: 4
    Management Information Systems presents a core of IS principles with which every business student should be familiar. Information technology has become a key component in accomplishing strategic and operational goals in organizations today. It is necessary to understand how a company utilizes information technology to gain its competitive advantage in business. This course is designed to familiarize the student with the fundamental concepts and principles of information systems. Therefore, it focuses on breadth of coverage rather than the depth of any specific IS area. Topics include: the role of IT in organizations, computers and information processing, hardware and software, managing data resources, telecommunications and networks, electronic commerce, security, IS ethics and leading information technologies and applications.
    Prerequisite(s): BUS 1100 .
  
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    BUS 2213 - Business Statistics

    Credits: 4
    Provides an introduction to fundamental statistical principles and procedures. Topics include descriptive statistics, discrete and continuous probability distributions and sampling distributions, statistical inference and estimation, linear regression and correlation.
    Prerequisite(s): BUS 1100  and MTH 1003  (or course equivalent: MTH 1016 , MTH 1115 , or MTH 1217 ). Students cannot take both BUS 2213 and MTH 1111 /MTH 1110  for academic credit.
    Fulfills: Q in LS Core.
  
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    BUS 2215 - Managerial Finance

    Credits: 4
    This course introduces the basics of a standard finance course. The goal is to provide a comfortable level of understanding of financial markets and securities for all business majors. The course will develop the financial skills and knowledge that will help them interact with the other functions of the firm to make good managerial decisions. The main topics included in the course are outlined under five main areas: (1) financial markets and institutions in a global environment; (2) financial ratios, budgeting, a firm’s pro forma financial statements, and cash flows determining firm value; (3) time value of money tools and concepts (compounding, discounting, annuities, and perpetuities); (4) relationship between risk and return; and (5) the basics of bond & stock valuation.
    Prerequisite(s): BUS 2203 , MTH 1003  (or course equivalent: MTH 1016 , MTH 1115 , or MTH 1217  ), and ECO 1201 .
  
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    BUS 2220 - Operations Management

    Credits: 4
    The course is designed to provide students majoring in business administration with an overview of the concepts, methodologies, and applications of operations management (OM). The focus of operations in the process of converting or transforming resources into products and services. The principal responsibilities of operations managers lie in making sound, cost-effective decisions that increase the productivity and competitiveness of both manufacturing and service organizations. The process of planning, implementing and monitoring the production allows operations managers to continuously improve in providing high quality goods and services at low cost thereby adding more value for the customer.
    Prerequisite(s): BUS 1100 , BUS 2203  & BUS 2213 .
    Fulfills: X in LS Core.
  
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    BUS 4402W - Strategic Analysis and Decision Making

    Credits: 4
    Strategic Analysis and Decision Making is a capstone course that exposes students to issues that concern the firm as a whole. Through the use of “real-world” case studies and sophisticated practitioner journal articles, students will be called upon to grapple with such strategic issues as sizing up an organization’s standing in the marketplace, differentiating between winning and mediocre strategies, and spotting ways to improve a company’s strategy execution. In this course student teams will meet with the teaching team one hour per week to discuss their analysis of the assigned readings and cases.
    Prerequisite(s): BUS 1100  and all required BUS2xxx courses.
    Fulfills: X and W in LS Core.
  
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    BUS 4850 - Business Internship

    Credits: 4
    Paid and unpaid internships are an opportunity for students to gain experience in actual work settings where they can apply their classroom and other prior learning. Students work with their work setting supervisor and their professor to gain insights into the daily routines and the overall process, activities, and content of a particular setting or industry. Internships may be in for-profit, not-for-profit or public sector organizations depending on the interests of the student. While there is no specific GPA requirement for the course, it is generally recommended that you have a minimum GPA of 2.70.
    Prerequisite(s): Must submit application to be reviewed for approval prior to registration. 
    Fulfills: X in LS Core.
    Note: This course will fulfill a required elective for the following concentration(s):

  
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    BUS 4900 - Special Topics in Business

    Credits: 4
    This course is designed to explore contemporary issues in Business. The specific topic varies each time the course is taught. Descriptions are available in the Business Dean’s office.
    Prerequisite(s): BUS 1100 .

Civil Engineering

  
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    CEN 2001 - Site Engineering

    Credits: 4
    This course provides students the necessary background to select and develop sites for civil engineering structures as well as review the work of others. Proper site selection and engineering have a significant impact on the economics of a project and long-term utility of the constructed facility. Specifically, the course covers the skills of determining site layout and access, establishing site contour and drainage, installation of utilities, elementary surveying, creation of drawings using a computer aided drafting package, and performing alternatives assessments.
  
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    CEN 3010 - Structural Analysis

    Credits: 4
    Civil Engineering 3010 is an introductory course in structural analysis. An important component of this course is the repetitive training in evaluating the performance of structural systems qualitatively based on inspection of the deflected shape of a structure under a given set of loads. In addition, emphasis is given in the development of appropriate computer analysis models and interpretation of the model results. Through these analysis tools, students will gain an understanding of structural behavior and work towards developing a “feel” for structures.
    Prerequisite(s): GEN 2012 .
  
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    CEN 3020 - Geotechnical Engineering

    Credits: 4
    An introduction to the fundamental principles of geotechnical engineering: the interaction of earth materials with the built environment. Soil composition, classification, compaction, seepage, consolidation, and shear strength. Intensive laboratory exercises familiarize the student with standard laboratory test methods for soil property determination and to reinforce data collection, data analysis, and report writing skills.
    Prerequisite(s): GEN 2012  and GEN 3040 .
  
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    CEN 3030 - Transportation Engineering

    Credits: 4
    An introduction to the engineering of transportation systems in the context of one mode: highways. The major aspects of highway engineering are covered in a framework of the highway planning and design process in the US and include: history and description of the US system of highways, its administration and finance, the planning process, alternatives evaluation, traffic engineering, traffic operations and safety, geometric design, and structural pavement design. Laboratories involve a community design project in which field studies are conducted and used in developing alternative design strategies, provided in a final design submission.
    Prerequisite(s): CEN 2001 .
    Corequisite(s): MTH 1505  or MTH 2527.
    Fulfills: X in LS Core
  
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    CEN 3050 - Environmental Engineering

    Credits: 4
    Introduction to the processes and systems utilized in the principal areas of environmental engineering-water, wastewater, air and solid waste management. Emphasis is placed on the engineering principles and practices involved in the collection, treatment and disposal of wastewater, the collection, treatment and distribution of water, the types, sources and disposal of solid wastes, and the types, sources, treatment and distribution of air pollutants. A brief introduction to water resources is also included.
    Prerequisite(s):  CHM 1110 , GEN 2012  and GEN 3040 .
    Corequisite(s): MTH 2220 .
  
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    CEN 3090 - Professionalism and Ethics

    Credits: 1
    Students are exposed to the ethical and professional environment in which they will be practicing after graduation. This seminar, through a series of invited speakers, involves discussions about professionalism, engineering ethics and the practice of engineering.
  
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    CEN 4060 - Geology

    Credits: 4
    An introduction to physical and historical geology including mineral and rock identification, earthquakes, plate tectonics and natural earth resources. Emphasis is placed on map interpretation of land forms, sedimentation, earthquake mechanisms, engineering geology and applied geology. Occasional laboratory sessions and field trips will be arranged.
    Fulfills: Mathematics/Science distribution requirement. X in LS Core
  
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    CEN 4810 - Special Topics

    Credits: 4
    Lectures, reading, study and research on topics of importance in civil engineering. This course is tailored to the interest of faculty and students and offered only on demand.
    Prerequisite(s): consent of the instructor.
  
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    CEN 4820 - Directed Study

    Credits: 4
    Qualified students may propose a course of individual study and work to be conducted under the direction of a member of the department.
    Prerequisite(s): consent of the instructor.
  
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    CEN 4900 - Senior Seminar

    Credits: 1
    The first step in becoming a registered Professional Engineer is to take and pass the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) exam. This course provides a review of the exam for graduating seniors. Open to Civil Engineering seniors only.
  
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    CEN 4901 - Design Project

    Credits: 4
    A capstone design course which draws together into a single project material learned during the first three and one- half years of study. The design team approach will be utilized in the course. A project suggested by the college or community group will be designed so that a team-client relationship exists.
    Prerequisite(s): CEN 3090  and instructor permission.
    Fulfills: X in LS Core
  
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    CEN 5012 - Steel Analysis and Design

    Credits: 4
    This is an introductory course in the design and analysis of steel structures based upon specifications published by the American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC). The objective of this course is to introduce students to the structural design process and to provide a detailed understanding of the design of steel structures. The course will emphasize the general theory and behavior of structural steel, as well as design practice.
    Prerequisite(s): CEN 3010 , MTH 2220 .
    Four lecture hours a week.
  
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    CEN 5016 - Concrete Analysis and Design

    Credits: 4
    This is an introductory course in the design and analysis of reinforced concrete structures. An introduction to the ACI- 318 building code is given in the context of the course to familiarize students with the main design document in the country. The objective of this course is to introduce students to the structural design process and to provide a detailed understanding of the design of reinforced concrete structures. The course will emphasize the general theory and behavior of reinforced concrete, as well as design practice.
    Prerequisite(s): CEN 3010 , MTH 2220 .
  
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    CEN 5020 - Foundation Engineering

    Credits: 4
    An introduction to the geotechnical design aspects of foundations. Site investigation techniques and characterization of subsurface conditions. Analysis and design of shallow and deep foundations subjected to vertical and lateral loading, with an emphasis on bearing capacity and settlement. Evaluation and selection of foundation types and alternatives. Case studies and design problems.
    Prerequisite(s): CEN 3020 , MTH 2220 .
  
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    CEN 5022 - Earth Slopes and Retaining Structures

    Credits: 4
    An examination of the geotechnical design aspects of earth slopes and retaining structures. Lateral earth pressure theories and slope stability analyses related to excavations and retaining structures. Analysis and design of retaining walls, sheet-pile walls, and braced and unbraced excavations. Case studies and design problems.
    Prerequisite(s): CEN 3020 , MTH 2220 .
  
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    CEN 5030 - Environmental Design

    Credits: 4
    This course is structured to emphasize the design method. Design projects are taken from the areas of water and wastewater treatment, solid waste disposal, air pollution control, hydraulics and applied hydrology. Assignments are intended to bring together much of the material covered in previous courses. Oral and written reports, design specifications and preliminary drawings are required for all assignments.
    Prerequisite(s): CEN 3050 , MTH 2220 .
  
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    CEN 5032 - Applied Hydrology

    Credits: 4
    This course begins with an introduction to hydrologic principles followed by applications to rainfall-runoff analysis, floodplain hydraulics and groundwater hydrology. A strong emphasis is placed on computational methods and computer programs are used for problem solving.
    Prerequisite(s): CEN 3050 , MTH 2220 .
  
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    CEN 5040 - Geometric Design of Highways

    Credits: 4
    Development and applications of geometric design tools for rural and urban highways. Topics include: design controls and criteria; elements of design, including sight distance, horizontal and vertical alignment; cross-section elements; highway types; intersection design elements; types of interchanges and interchange design elements; grade separations and clearance; development of visual elements.
    Prerequisite(s): CEN 3030 .
  
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    CEN 5042 - Traffic Engineering

    Credits: 4
    Engineering principles for safe and efficient movement of goods and people on streets and highways, including characteristics of users, vehicles and traffic facilities; data collection; traffic control; operational analysis; design; management; safety; parking and related aspects of transportation planning and geometric design.
    Prerequisite(s): CEN 3030 .
  
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    CEN 5044 - Transportation Planning & Systems Analysis

    Credits: 4
    Review and critique of techniques used to plan transportation facilities and services in urban areas; application of selected techniques to forecast demand and evaluate transportation alternatives.
    Prerequisite(s): CEN 3030 .
  
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    CEN 5050 - Construction Planning and Management

    Credits: 4
    Construction management process and methods; estimating construction cost and bidding, construction activity planning and scheduling, project planning; project cost and cost control; construction organization costs control; computerized project scheduling.
    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing or permission by instructor.

Chemistry

  
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    CHM 1000 - Adventures in Chemistry

    Credits: 4
    This chemistry course is for non-science majors. Topics include the scientific method, radioactivity, atomic structure, basic principles of chemistry as they apply to air and water pollution, and the political ramifications of worldwide chemical use. Not open to science and engineering majors or any student that has completed any other chemistry course.
    Fulfills: Mathematics/Science distribution requirement. STEM requirement in LS Core.
    Four hours per week.
  
  •  

    CHM 1110 - General Chemistry I

    Credits: 4
    This chemistry course is for science majors. Topics include the composition of matter, the mole, stoichiometry, atomic structure, molecular bonding and structure, thermochemistry and gases. Emphasis is placed on problem-solving techniques. The laboratory offers experiments to supplement the lecture material.
    Prerequisite(s): One year of High School Chemistry and MTH 1000  or placing out of MTH 1000  on the math placement test.
    Fulfills: Mathematics/Science distribution requirement. STEM requirement in LS Core.
    When Offered: Every fall and spring semester.
    Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory per week.
  
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    CHM 1120 - General Chemistry II

    Credits: 4
    This chemistry course is for science majors. Topics include aqueous solutions, acids and bases, equilibrium calculations, kinetics, thermodynamics, and electrochemistry. The laboratory offers experiments to supplement the lecture material.
    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in CHM 2220 .
    Fulfills: Mathematics/Science distribution requirement. STEM requirement in LS Core.
    When Offered: Every spring semester.
    Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory per week.
  
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    CHM 1210 - Chemistry for the Health Professions I

    Credits: 4
    In this course, fundamental chemical principles will be covered and their relationship to health-related professions will be discussed. Topics to be covered include: measurements and units; classification of matter; atoms and elements; ionic and molecular structure; chemical reactions and their stoichiometry, energetics, rates, and equilibria; the properties of matter as gases, liquids, solids, and solutions; acids and bases; and nuclear chemistry. This course is the first of a two-course sequence intended for Exercise Science and Sports Medicine majors. This course is not intended for students interested in pursuing a career as a physician’s assistant or nurse practitioner or for thoseinterested in medical, dental or veterinary school.
    Prerequisite(s): MTH 1000  or placing out of MTH 1000  on the math placement test.
    Fulfills: STEM requirement in LS Core.
    When Offered: Every fall semester.
    Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory per week.
  
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    CHM 1220 - Chemistry for the Health Professions II

    Credits: 4
    In this course, fundamental principles of organic chemistry will be covered and their relationship to health-related professions will be discussed. This course will cover the structure, nomenclature, properties, and reactions of the compounds of carbon. Topics at the interface between organic chemistry and biological chemistry, such as amino acids, proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids will also be covered. This course is the second of a two-course sequence intended for Exercise Science and Sports Medicine majors. This course is not intended for students interested in pursuing a career as a physician’s assistant or nurse practitioner or for thoseinterested in medical, dental or veterinary school.
    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in CHM 1210 .
    Fulfills: STEM requirement in LS Core.
    When Offered: Every spring semester.
    Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory per week.
  
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    CHM 1610 - Investigations in Chemistry I

    Credits: 4
    This course considers the scientific method and chemistry concepts as applied to the study of forensic science. Topics to be covered include: measurement and units, atoms and elements, ionic and molecular bonding and structure, chemical reactions and their stoichiometry, and the properties and chemistry of solutions. 
    Prerequisite(s): MTH 1000  or equivalent
    Fulfills: STEM requirement in LS Core.
    When Offered: Every fall semester.
    Four hours per week.
  
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    CHM 1620 - Investigations in Chemistry II

    Credits: 4
    This course considers the scientific method and chemistry concepts as applied to the study of forensic science. Topics to be covered include: organic molecules, thermochemistry, gas laws, chemical kinetics, nuclear chemistry, chemical equilibrium, and an introduction to biochemistry DNA analysis.
    Prerequisite(s): CHM 1610  
    Fulfills: STEM requirement in LS Core.
    When Offered: Every spring semester.
    Four hours per week.
  
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    CHM 2210 - Organic Chemistry I

    Credits: 4
    This course is an introduction to the chemistry of carbon. The concepts of bonding, structure, and classification of compounds by functional groups, as well as reactions of aliphatic hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, alcohols, and ethers are presented from a mechanistic viewpoint. Stereochemical principles are emphasized. Infrared spectroscopy and mass spectrometry are introduced. The laboratory offers experiments to supplement the lecture material.
    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in CHM 1110 .
    Fulfills: STEM requirement in LS Core.
    When Offered: Every spring semester.
    Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory per week.
  
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    CHM 2220 - Organic Chemistry II

    Credits: 4
    A continuation of CHM 2210 . The chemistry of aromatic compounds is introduced, and strong emphasis is given to the chemistry of organic compounds containing the carbonyl and amine functional groups. The application of organic reactions in multistep synthesis and the biological applications are emphasized. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy is introduced. The laboratory offers experiments to supplement the lecture material.
    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in CHM 2210 .
    Fulfills: STEM requirement in LS Core.
    When Offered: Every fall semester.
    Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory per week.
  
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    CHM 2320 - Inorganic Chemistry

    Credits: 4
    This course introduces the chemistry of transition metals and main group elements. Topics include theories of bonding, kinetics and mechanisms of reactions of transition metal complexes, oxidation-reduction reactions, hard-soft acid-base theory, and solid-state chemistry. Applications of inorganic chemistry to other areas (organic, analytical, and physical chemistry, as well as biology and biochemistry) are highlighted throughout the course. The laboratory portion of the course involves the synthesis and spectroscopic investigation of inorganic complexes.
    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in CHM 2220 .
    When Offered: Every fall semester.
    Four hours of lecture and one four-hour laboratory per week.
  
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    CHM 3010 - Junior Chemistry Seminar I

    Credits: 0
    Chemistry seminar is a weekly presentation by either an outside speaker or an expert from Merrimack College on a variety of topics related to scientific research or professional development. This seminar is required of junior chemistry majors.
    When Offered: Every fall semester.
    One and a half hours per week.
  
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    CHM 3020 - Junior Chemistry Seminar II

    Credits: 0
    Chemistry seminar is a weekly presentation by either an outside speakers or an expert from Merrimack College on a variety of topics related to scientific research or professional development. This seminar is required of junior chemistry majors.
    When Offered: Every spring semester.
    One and a half hours per week.
  
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    CHM 3410 - Analytical Chemistry

    Credits: 4
    This course is a study of the theoretical principles, practical applications, and limitations of chemical analysis. Topics include acid-base, precipitation and complexation titrations, electrochemistry, potentiometry, quantitative molecular spectroscopy, and gas and liquid chromatography. The laboratory provides experience in the hands-on use of chemical instrumentation and interpretation of the data. This course stresses the importance of clearly written laboratory reports.
    Prerequisite(s): CHM 1120  and CHM 2220 .
    When Offered: Every spring semester.
    Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory per week.
  
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    CHM 3570(W) - Biophysical Chemistry

    Credits: 4
    This course presents the foundations and biological applications of thermodynamics and kinetics appropriate for a chemistry or biochemistry major. The topics covered include the first and second laws of thermodynamics, phase equilibria, chemical equilibrium, ion and electron transport, rates of reactions, accounting for rate laws and complex biochemical processes such as transport across membranes, enzyme kinetics and electron transfer in biological systems. Laboratory experiments supplement the lecture material.
    Prerequisite(s): CHM 2220 , PHY 2212 , and MTH 1218 .
    Fulfills: W in LS Core
    When Offered: Every fall semester.
    Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory per week.
  
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    CHM 3580 - Physical Chemistry II

    Credits: 4
    A continuation of CHM 3570(W) . Topics include quantum chemistry, molecular structure and spectroscopy, and statistical mechanics. Laboratory experiments supplement the lecture material.
    Prerequisite(s): CHM 2220 , PHY 2212  and MTH 2219 .
    When Offered: Every spring semester of odd-numbered years.
    Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory per week.
  
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    CHM 3600 - Introduction to Research Methods

    Credits: 2
    This research laboratory course introduces students to the process of and techniques employed in conducting independent research in chemistry and biochemistry. Topics include literature search, experimental design, time management and dissemination of experimental results through oral presentations, written reports and/or journal submissions. Students undertake a series of multifaceted projects of increasing complexity culminating in a self-designed project.
    Prerequisite(s): CHM 2220 , CHM 2320 , CHM 3410 .
  
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    CHM 4010 - Senior Chemistry Seminar I

    Credits: 0
    Chemistry seminar is a weekly presentation by outside speakers on a variety of topics of scientific interest. This seminar is required of senior chemistry majors. Senior chemistry majors are required to give one 15-minute presentation about their research, directed study, or a topic of interest at the end of the semester.
    When Offered: Every fall semester.
    One and a half hours per week.
  
  •  

    CHM 4020 - Senior Chemistry Seminar II

    Credits: 0
    This course is a weekly presentation by outside speakers on a variety of topics of scientific interest. This seminar is required of senior chemistry majors. Senior Chemistry majors are required to give a 30-minute presentation about their research or directed study at the end of the semester.
    When Offered: Every spring semester.
    One and a half hours per week.
  
  •  

    CHM 4250 - Advanced Synthetic Organic Chemistry

    Credits: 4
    This course will cover advanced synthetic methods with an emphasis on the application of structure and theory to mechanism and reaction dynamics. Topics include stereochemical features of reactions, conformational analysis, stereoelectronic effects and retro-synthesis of small molecules. Advanced organic reactions including modern carbon- carbon bond formation techniques, organometallic reagents, pericyclic reactions and enantioselective catalysis will also be discussed.
    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in CHM 2220 .
  
  •  

    CHM 4260 - Instrumental Analysis

    Credits: 4
    This course will cover advanced Instrumentation techniques utilized in chemistry research laboratories and the application of these techniques to qualitative analysis of organic molecules. Emphasis will be placed on structural elucidation of complex molecules containing stereochemistry using UV-Vis spectroscopy, Mass spectrometry (MS), Infrared Spectroscopy (IR), and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrometry (1D & 2D NMR).
    Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in CHM 2220 .
    Three hours of lecture and one four-hour laboratory per week.
  
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    CHM 4350 - Bioinorganic Chemistry

    Credits: 4
    This course will focus on the role that metal ions play in biological systems. The transport, storage, and binding of metals in biological systems will be discussed in great detail. Special attention will be given to the importance of metal ions and their complexes in oxygen transport, Lewis acid catalysis, electron transfer, and signaling, as well as their use as diagnostic and therapeutic agents. Different methods used to study the function of the metal ions (model complexes and specialized spectroscopic methods) will also be covered. Distribution of the 4 hrs between classroom and laboratory time each week will be at the discretion of the instructor.
    Prerequisite(s): CHM 2320  and BIO 3037 .
    Four hours per week.
  
  •  

    CHM 4560 - Materials and Polymer Chemistry

    Credits: 4
    Materials and Polymer Chemistry is an overview of inorganic, organic and nanobased materials from a structure versus property approach. Basic chemical and physical principles will be applied to interdisciplinary problems in materials discovery, design, and characterization. Topics covered will include solid state chemistry (amorphous and crystalline solids), metals, semiconductors, polymeric materials and nanomaterials. Materials characterization will cover optical microscopy, electron microscopy, particle bombardment techniques for surface characterization, and scanning probe microscopy.
    Prerequisite(s): CHM 2220 CHM 2320 , and CHM 3570(W) 
    Four hours per week.
  
  •  

    CHM 4650 - Medicinal Chemistry

    Credits: 4
    This course will cover medicinal chemistry concepts with an emphasis on the drug discovery process. Topics will include catalytic strategies, genres of inhibitors, drug discovery processes, and the biochemical basis of disease. The course will also examine the mode of action of antibiotics and other influential drugs. The course will also have a brief overview of pharmacology. The course will be composed of both lecture and laboratory components.
    Prerequisite(s): Grades of C or better in both CHM 2210  and BIO 3037 .
    Six hours per week.
  
  •  

    CHM 4800 - Directed Study

    Credits: 2 or 4
    In lieu of a formal course, qualified upper class students may substitute an intensive program of study under the direction of a member of the department and with departmental approval, which must be obtained prior to registration.
    Prerequisite(s): CHM 2220  and consent of the instructor.
  
  •  

    CHM 4910 - Directed Research I

    Credits: 4
    Chemistry and Biochemistry majors will take this laboratory research course directed by a faculty member. In addition to laboratory work, course requirements include literature reviews, group discussions, and presentation of a seminar to the department.
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the department.
    Fulfills: X in LS Core
    When Offered: Every fall semester.
    Scheduled by arrangement with research advisor.
  
  •  

    CHM 4920 - Directed Research II

    Credits: 4
    A continuation of CHM 4910 . A senior thesis and final presentation of results completes the two-semester project.
    Prerequisite(s): CHM 4910 .
    Fulfills: X in LS Core
    When Offered: Every spring semester.
    Scheduled by arrangement with research advisor.
  
  •  

    CHM 4930 - Senior Internship I

    Credits: 4
    The Senior Internship course offers Chemistry and Biochemistry majors experiential learning opportunities in an industrial setting. The course offers students the opportunity to explore a career in industry and to establish experience which may lead to employment after graduation. Students work 10 hours per week in an industrial, governmental, or other laboratory setting. Students should meet with the internship coordinator in the semester prior to the internship to determine an appropriate placement. A memorandum of understanding concerning the responsibilities of the student must be signed by the student, the industry representative, and the internship coordinator.
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the department.
    When Offered: Every fall semester.
  
  •  

    CHM 4940 - Senior Internship II

    Credits: 4
    A continuation of CHM 4930 . At the end of the semester, students are expected to give a presentation on their work experience.
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the department.
    When Offered: Every spring semester.

Communication

  
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    COM 1020 - Public Communication

    Credits: 4
    This course focuses on the concepts and practices associated with effective public communication. A central aspect of this course entails the mastering of public speaking through the process of researching, preparing, and delivering presentations in a variety of formats (e.g., informative, persuasive, and impromptu). The classroom serves as a laboratory to develop the skills needed for effective public communication. In addition, students will also analyze public speaking events as a means of developing a critical understanding of the public communication process.
  
  •  

    COM 2010 - Research Inquiry

    Credits: 4
    This course is offered to help students examine both quantitative and qualitative methodologies utilized by researchers in Communication. Students will be introduced to the concepts of research design, sampling, measurement, data collection, behavioral observation, statistical analysis and ethics. The difference between implications of humanistic/interpretive research and positivistic/objective research will be emphasized.
    Prerequisite(s): This course is for  Communication majors only. 
    Fulfills: Q in LS Core
    Note: This course is for Communication majors only.
  
  •  

    COM 2401 - Introduction to Mass Communication

    Credits: 4
    This course focuses on the basic principles of mass communication and its historical development. Issues explored include media access, media ethics, media effects, and current trends in the growth of digital and wireless mass communication technologies. Students examine the role of the media industry in reinforcing and challenging dominant values, attitudes, and beliefs central to American culture. An additional feature of the course studies how mass media-created ideals have been disseminated internationally, as well as how media businesses reflect, influence and sometimes defy societal norms. Students will also have the opportunity to develop their own independent mass media project.
    Prerequisite(s): No prerequisities.
    Fulfills: SOSC requirement in LS Core
 

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