Sep 20, 2019  
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Physics

  
  •  

    PHY 2202 - General Physics II

    Credits: 4
    Second semester of a one-year introduction to physics, without calculus. Topics normally include oscillations, electric charge, electric fields and forces, electric potential and potential energy, electric current, DC circuits, magnetism, Faraday’s Law, and geometric optics.  
    Prerequisite(s): PHY 2201  or PHY 2211 .
    Corequisite(s): PHY2002L (concurrent enrollment)
    Fulfills: Mathematics/Science distribution requirement. Q and a STEM requirement in LS Core.
    Four and a half to five hours of integrated lecture, discussion, and group problem-solving a week.
  
  •  

    PHY 2211 - Physics I

    Credits: 4
    First semester of a one-year calculus-based introduction to physics, for students in engineering, chemistry, biology, physics, and others. Topics normally include vectors, kinematics, Newton’s laws of motion, work and energy, momentum, rotational and orbital motion, torque, angular momentum, and oscillations.  
    Prerequisite(s): MTH 1217  or MTH 1016  with a final grade of B or higher and Corequisite: MTH 1217  
    Corequisite(s): PHY2001L (concurrent enrollment)
    Fulfills: Mathematics/Science distribution requirement. Q and a STEM requirement in LS Core.
    Four and a half to five hours of integrated lecture, discussion, and group problem-solving a week.
  
  •  

    PHY 2212 - Physics II

    Credits: 4
    Second semester of a one-year calculus-based introduction to physics, for students in engineering, chemistry, biology, physics, and others. Topics normally include electric charge, electric fields and forces, electric potential and potential energy, fields and potentials produced by continuous charge distributions, DC circuit analysis, magnetic fields and forces, Faraday’s law, motors and generators, waves, geometric optics, and (instructor option) special relativity. 
    Prerequisite(s): PHY 2211  
    Corequisite(s): PHY2002L (concurrent enrollment)
    Fulfills: Mathematics/Science distribution requirement. Q and a STEM requirement in LS Core.
    Four and a half to five hours of integrated lecture, discussion, and group problem-solving a week.
  
  •  

    PHY 2213 - Introduction to Thermodynamics

    Credits: 2
    A two-credit (one semester) introduction to thermodynamics. Topics include the ideal gas law, the molecular interpretation of temperature, the first law of thermodynamics, the second law of thermodynamics (including a quantitative treatment of entropy), heat transfer, and applications of the laws and relations of thermodynamics to thermal expansion, phase changes, calorimetry, heat engines, and refrigerators.
    Prerequisite(s): PHY 2211  and MTH 1218 .
  
  •  

    PHY 2241 - Introduction to Quantum Physics

    Credits: 4
    A one-semester introduction to quantum physics. Topics include special relativity (at option of the instructor), the failure of classical physics in the quantum domain (as illustrated by the photoelectric effect and the double slit experiment), the dual wave-particle nature of light and matter, the wave function and its interpretation, the Schrodinger equation and its solutions for selected bound and unbound problems, and the physics of atoms, nuclei, and elementary particles.
    Prerequisite(s): PHY 2212  and MTH 1218  or instructor permission.
    Fulfills: Q and a STEM requirement in LS Core.
  
  •  

    PHY 3008 - Introduction to General Relativity

    Credits: 4
    In Einstein’s theory of general relativity, gravitation is understood as an interaction between mass and spacetime. In the elegant words of Taylor and Wheeler: “spacetime tells mass how to move; mass tells spacetime how to curve.” In this course we bypass Einstein’s field equations (the subject of advanced graduate physics courses) and go straight to the Schwarzschild metric, which makes general relativity - the best theory of gravity that has been developed to date - accessible to anyone willing to use algebra, differential calculus, and a handful of integrals. Topics include special relativity, gravitational time dilation, the role of general relativity in the Global Positioning System, the advance of the perihelion of Mercury, gravitational deflection of light, and orbital mechanics in the vicinity of a black hole.
    Prerequisite(s): MTH 1218  and PHY 2212 , or permission of the instructor.
    Fulfills: Mathematics/Science distribution requirement. Q and STEM requirement in LS Core.
    When Offered: On sufficient demand.
  
  •  

    PHY 3200 - Mathematical Physics

    Credits: 4
    Mathematical methods employed throughout science are investigated with a particular emphasis on those used in physics. Topics normally include infinite series, complex algebra, differential equations (including method of power series substitution), Fourier series, operators and matrices (including eigenvalue problems), coordinate systems, and vector calculus. Further topics may be included at the discretion of the instructor.
    Prerequisite(s): PHY 2241 , MTH 2219 .
  
  •  

    PHY 3304 - Thermal Physics

    Credits: 4
    The laws of thermodynamics, their application to single and multi-component systems, and their underlying foundation in statistical mechanics.
    Prerequisite(s): PHY 2241  and MTH 2219 .
  
  •  

    PHY 3311 - Analytical Mechanics I

    Credits: 4
    Newton’s laws, motion of a particle, oscillations, Newtonian gravitation, rotating and other non-inertial reference frames, motion of rigid bodies.
    Prerequisite(s): PHY 2241  or permission of the department, MTH 2219 .
    Corequisite(s): MTH 2220 .
  
  •  

    PHY 3325 - Physical Optics

    Credits: 4
    An introduction to the scalar theory of diffraction. Topics include the scalar wave equation and its applications, coherence and comparison of thermal and laser sources, interferometry and its applications to instrumentation, and linear optical systems analyses for imaging.
    Prerequisite(s): PHY 2241  and MTH 2219 .
    When Offered: On sufficient demand.
  
  •  

    PHY 3345 - Electromagnetic Theory I

    Credits: 4
    This course focuses on the development and application of the integral and differential forms of Maxwell’s equations. Specific topics typically include vector calculus, electrostatics and magnetostatics in vacuum, Laplace’s equation and related boundary value problems, electromagnetic induction, the wave equation and electromagnetic waves.
    Prerequisite(s): PHY 2241 , MTH 2219  and MTH 2220 .
  
  •  

    PHY 4412 - Quantum Mechanics I

    Credits: 4
    Schrodinger equation, Dirac notation, infinite square well, quantum simple harmonic oscillator, angular momentum, spin, the hydrogen atom, and (time permitting) further topics chosen by the instructor.
    Prerequisite(s): PHY 2241 , MTH 2219 , MTH 2220 .
    Corequisite(s): MTH 3335 .
  
  •  

    PHY 4451 - Advanced Laboratory

    Credits: 4
    An advanced laboratory course in which students conduct experiments similar to those that led to the development of modern physics. Several hours of largely independent laboratory work per week.
    Fulfills: X in LS Core
  
  •  

    PHY 4803 - Special Topics in Physics

    Credits: variable credit
    Reading, lectures, study and research on topics of importance in physics, tailored to the interests of the participating faculty and students. Offered only on demand, subject to instructor availability.
    Prerequisite(s): Instructor consent.
  
  •  

    PHY 4806 - Directed Research

    Credits: variable credit
    Supervised investigation of an experimental or theoretical problem of interest to the student.
    Prerequisite(s): Evidence of sufficient background to undertake the problem of interest, subject to availability of a faculty advisor.

Political Science

  
  •  

    POL 1000 - Current Issues in Politics and Government

    Credits: 4
    An introduction to the field of political science designed for non-majors and undecided majors. This course examines several current policy controversies in the political arena and explores how they can be understood using common concepts and theories in the discipline. The course will focus on current policy debates such as: What to do about low voter turnout? How should the US relate to other countries in the world? Does the legal system produce justice?
    Fulfills: Social Science distribution requirement. SOSC requirement in LS Core.
  
  •  

    POL 1100 - Politics of the United States

    Credits: 4
    An introduction to the American political system, this course examines (1) the Constitutional basis of American politics, (2) the national institutions that are involved in decision-making and public debate (for example, the Presidency and the bureaucracy, the Federal Courts, the Congress, political parties, the media), (3) issues that Americans argue about (rights and liberties, economic benefits, foreign policy), and the processes by which those arguments are conducted and resolved (campaigns and elections, administrative action, legislation, lobbying, publicity). Required course for all Political Science Majors and Minors.
    Fulfills: Social Science distribution requirement. SOSC requirement and X in LS Core.
  
  •  

    POL 1500 - Comparative Politics

    Credits: 4
    This course examines a variety of important issues, such as why are some countries democratic while others are not, what is a state and how did states come about, what is colonialism and how did it shape the present and future of billions of people? The course addresses these questions through an introduction to the study of comparative politics - the art and science of comparing political systems in order to raise and evaluate claims about politics. The substantive material draws on developed and developing parts of the world and covers contemporary as well as recent historical events. Required course for all Political Science Majors and Minors.
    Fulfills: Social Science distribution requirement. SOSC & D requirement in LS Core.
  
  •  

    POL 2000(W) - Political Science Methods

    Credits: 4
    This course considers a variety of approaches to political science research, but emphasizes the behavioral and quantitative approaches that are widely utilized in the study of politics. Students will develop both research skills and learn to understand and appreciate the methodology of the discipline. This course is required for the major or minor and must be taken by majors by the end of sophomore year. Students are strongly encouraged to take Basic Statistics, prior to taking this course.
    Prerequisite(s): Political Science Major/Minor or INTS Major and POL 1100  or POL 1500  or permission of instructor.
    Fulfills: Social Science distribution requirement. SOSC, Q and W in LS Core.
  
  •  

    POL 2010 - Political Ethics

    Credits: 4
    The course will provide a foundation in ethics, ethical theory, and their application to political institutions and the political process. The course will cover the ethical issues and implications faced by politicians, elected officials and government employees in the operation of the government and in making public policy decisions, along with those faced by individuals and entities interacting or doing business with the government. The course will examine how these ethical issues can be resolved in politics and public policy making. Through the use of select case studies, the course will explore current and past ethical issues in politics and public policy making, including torturing of terrorists, NSA spying, whistleblowing, police shootings, illegal immigration and fraud in military and other government contracts.
    Fulfills: Ethics (E) requirement in LS Core.
  
  •  

    POL 2111 - State and Local Politics

    Credits: 4
    The face-to-face interactions between citizens and governments in states and communities are the central focus of this course. This course will examine what various governments and officials do, how and when they do it. This course will discuss the institutions and policies of state and local governments and also consider the effect of outside factors such as federalism, grass roots participation, interest groups and political parties of governing.
    Fulfills: Social Science distribution requirement. SOSC requirement in LS Core.
  
  •  

    POL 2120 - Government, Business and Society

    Credits: 4
    This course examines the relationship between the public and private sector in the Unites States from a constitutional, historical and contemporary perspective. Public policy issues such as economic and social regulation, antitrust and economic stabilization policy will be examined in detail. Students will research and orally present a case study of a contemporary government-business relationship.
    Fulfills: Social Science distribution requirement. SOSC requirement in LS Core.
  
  •  

    POL 2121 - Intro to Public Administration

    Credits: 4
    This course is an examination of the structures and functions of the federal, state and local governments of the United States. Special attention will be given to the public policy process at the federal level. Students will complete in writing and present orally in class a detailed research project on a contemporary public policy issue.
    Prerequisite(s): POL 1100  
    Fulfills: Social Science distribution requirement. SOSC requirement in LS Core.
  
  •  

    POL 2122 - Law and Society

    Credits: 4
    An introductory course in the law that examines the theoretical and practical aspects of the law and its impact on individuals and society. The course will cover the history and sources of U.S. law, the difference between substantive, procedural, criminal, and civil law, legal reasoning, the structure and role of the federal and state court systems, the role of the litigation process, and the law of torts, contracts, landlord and tenant, personal property, consumer protection, real estate, agency, employment, and probate. Through the use of selected readings and courts cases, the course will focus on the legal, political, and social implications of these and select legal issues such as discrimination laws, drug testing, privacy laws, copyright laws and video and music downloading.
  
  •  

    POL 2181 - American Political Thought

    Credits: 4
    This course will consider the American vision of government from its roots in the thought of Locke, Calvin and Montesquieu and its institutionalization by Madison, Hamilton, Jefferson and other founders, through its development by Lincoln in the Civil War period and by Roosevelt and Johnson in the New Deal and Great Society eras. The course will concentrate on analyzing the writing of these various thinkers while focusing on themes such as freedom, property, rights, constitutionalism, equality and the role of government.
    Fulfills: SOSC requirement in LS Core.
  
  •  

    POL 2200 - Globalization

    Credits: 4
    Formerly: POL1200

    By almost any measure, we are living in the most economically internationalized era of world history. Our lives today are deeply intertwined with global social, economic, and political forces. The world as a whole is struggling with global challenges such as climate change, clash of civilizations/cultures/religions, and migration. This course explores globalization from a variety of perspectives. In this course, we will examine how competing perspectives on globalization help explain why this issue has generated much conflict and controversy. We will explore the impacts of globalization on jobs, poverty, income inequality, environment, state sovereignty, global security, and world culture, before asking what possible alternatives to globalization exist. 
    Fulfills: SOSC and D requirement in LS Core.

  
  •  

    POL 2300 - The Politics of Food

    Credits: 4
    Formerly: POL1300

    This course explores some of the many ways that what we eat is shaped and controlled by politics. In particular, the course topics center around helping students understand the ways that power dynamics and policy decisions in our political system shape what we eat and why. As a class, students will also seek to understand and evaluate the broader community and even global consequences of the politics of food. Class work and activities will involve approaching questions of food access and choice through other areas of study, such as anthropology, economics, and nutrition.  The course also has a service learning requirement. 
    Fulfills: SOSC & X requirement in LS Core.

  
  •  

    POL 2510 - International Politics

    Credits: 4
    Formerly: POL 1900
    This course will assist students in developing a coherent framework for international political analysis. First, we will examine the role of states, international organizations, individuals, and corporations in world politics. Next, we will examine the main theoretic approaches and debates of international relations. Lastly, we will focus on major international issues such as nuclear weapons, terrorism, humanitarian interventions, and cyberspace, as understood through the lens of analytical frameworks and theories.
    Fulfills: SOSC requirement in LS Core.
  
  •  

    POL 2581 - Intro to Political Theory

    Credits: 4
    The political ideas and theories of representative thinkers from the classical period through the Renaissance. The course includes readings from Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Augustine, Aquinas and Machiavelli.
    Fulfills: Social Science distribution requirement. H or a SOSC requirement in LS Core.
  
  •  

    POL 3112 - Congress and The Legislative Process

    Credits: 4
    A study of the lawmaking body in the United States Government, this course will consider the powers of the legislature, representation, membership and elections, the committee system, and the effect of inter and intra government forces on the policymaking process. The course will also focus on the legislative process with students participating in a legislative simulation.
    Fulfills: Social Science distribution requirement. SOSC requirement in LS Core.
  
  •  

    POL 3113 - The American Presidency

    Credits: 4
    This course will examine the constraints which limit presidents, the opportunities that presidents can seize, and the virtues which maximize their prospects for success. The objective of this course is to broaden your understanding of how this uniquely personalized institution developed, its constitutional authority, its relationship with other branches of government and how one gets selected for this office. Finally we will assess its current strengths and weaknesses and discuss the perception and reality of presidential power and leadership.
    Fulfills: Social Science distribution requirement. SOSC requirement in LS Core.
  
  •  

    POL 3114 - Political Parties and Interest Groups

    Credits: 4
    This course examines the roles played by political parties and interest groups in the American political system. This course will explore two themes: (1) how parties and interest groups manage social conflict and make it meaningful and (2) how much do political parties and interest groups give or fail to give citizens the opportunity to control those in government.
    Fulfills: Social Science distribution requirement. SOSC requirement in LS Core.
  
  •  

    POL 3122 - Issues in Public Policy

    Credits: 4
    This course examines selected contemporary issues in public policy at the national level of politics in the United States. Examples of policy areas include, but are not limited to, national security, economic stabilization, immigration, and global warming. Students will complete a 20-25 page research paper on a selected topic.
    Prerequisite(s): POL 1100   and POL 2121  
    Fulfills: Social Science distribution requirement. SOSC requirement and X in LS Core.
  
  •  

    POL 3130 - Campaigns and Elections

    Credits: 4
    The course will focus on the process by which American choose elected officials. Topics such as voting behavior, fundraising, the role of the media in campaigning and campaign ethics will be discussed.
    Fulfills: Social Science distribution requirement. SOSC requirement and X in LS Core.
  
  •  

    POL 3131 - Polling and Public Opinion

    Credits: 4
    This course examines what ordinary citizens think about politics, the origins of these attitudes, and what role public opinion plays in the American political system. Significant attention will be paid to the techniques of survey research by which we measure public opinion.
    Prerequisite(s): POL 1100   and POL2000
    Fulfills: Social Science distribution requirement. SOSC requirement in LS Core.
  
  •  

    POL 3140 - Mass Media and American Politics

    Credits: 4
    This course examines the role of the media in shaping political opinions and behavior. The role of the media in setting political agendas and reporting and interpreting political events will be examined. The nature and influence of public opinion in a democratic society will be studied.
    Cross-Listed: COM4132
    Fulfills: Social Science distribution requirement. SOSC requirement in LS Core.
  
  •  

    POL 3141 - Political Communication

    Credits: 4
    This course examines the role of political communication in the United States. The course will cover such topics as political advertising, campaign consulting and management and policymaking, polling, speech writing, negotiation, mediation and alternative dispute resolution. Students will write and present a political lobbying project on a contemporary political issue.
    Fulfills: SOSC requirement in LS Core.
  
  •  

    POL 3150 - Criminal Law

    Credits: 4
    This course is a survey of criminal law, including sources, classification, definitions, elements, defenses, and culpability. Specific topics include: homicide, assault and battery, domestic violence and protective orders, rape and sex offenses, theft crimes, criminal conspiracies, narcotics and alcohol offenses, white collar crimes, illegal firearms, Internet related crimes, the juvenile justice system, the role and impact of plea bargaining in the criminal justice system, victim’s rights, and punishment and sentencing. The course will also underscore the procedures associated with the judicial process, including criminal procedure and court jurisdiction on federal and state levels.
    Fulfills: SOSC and X requirement in LS Core.
  
  •  

    POL 3151 - American Constitutional Law

    Credits: 4
    A study of the United States Supreme Court in the American political system viewed historically and through analysis of leading cases from the court’s inception to the present.
    Fulfills: Social Science distribution requirement. SOSC requirement in LS Core.
  
  •  

    POL 3152 - Civil Liberties and Civil Rights

    Credits: 4
    A study of the way in which the American political system defines and defends the civil liberties and civil rights of individuals and groups.
    Fulfills: Social Science distribution requirement. SOSC requirement and D in LS Core.
  
  •  

    POL 3153 - Politics & Religion

    Credits: 4
    This course evaluates the influence of religion on politics through a blend of empirical, historical, normative, and legal approaches. The course will consider topics such as: the proper role of religion in public life; the role of religion in the American founding; the relationship between free exercise and establishment in American and international law; the balance between secularism, religion, and free speech; the relationship between religious belief and political behavior; the role of religious doctrine in public justification; the effect of religion on foreign policy; the political institutions of religious and non-religious nations; the correlation between religion and conflict; just war theory; the historical development of church/state relations. The course will both engage with the theoretical work from ancient and contemporary thinkers and be informed by empirical research. We will pay special attention to the intersection of normative theory and empirical inquiry.
  
  •  

    POL 3160 - United States Foreign Policy

    Credits: 4
    This course examines the ways in which American foreign policy is formulated and executed, with special attention to historical experience, established traditions, and recurrent policy debates over the proper role of the United States in the world, particularly in the face of global challenges.
    Fulfills: SOSC requirement in LS Core.
  
  •  

    POL 3161 - Politics of Immigration and Human Movement

    Credits: 4
    This course studies the movement of human populations through the lens of Political Science. Political Science is focused on the allocation and use of power and distribution of resources. Human population movements are clearly affected by the use of this power and access to resources. This course is structured to study those population flows, the “pushes” and “pulls” of migration, the effects of human migration on both the home and the host countries, and the academic theories that seek to explain policies on human migration and its effects (economic, cultural, political, religious, etc.), particularly in the United States.
    Fulfills: SOSC and D requirement in LS Core.
  
  •  

    POL 3171 - Music and Politics

    Credits: 4
    This course explores how music has been used as a means of expressing political will and as a political tool over history and throughout the world. We will study the use of protest music by those challenging political institutions as well as how political actors have treated music as a political tool. We will look at the political dynamics that gave rise to and found expression in particular genres of music and also consider questions of censorship and government control of music.
    Cross-Listed: FAA3171
    Fulfills: D in LS Core area requirements, AL or SOSC in LS Core course requirements.
  
  •  

    POL 3520 - Modern China

    Credits: 4
    An examination of the development of modern China since 1840. Internal and foreign policies will be covered with an emphasis on the period since the 1949 revolution.
    Fulfills: Social Science distribution requirement. SOSC requirement and D in LS Core.
  
  •  

    POL 3521 - Latin American Politics

    Credits: 4
    An examination of the major political trends and issues in contemporary Latin American countries, including poverty, inequality, underdevelopment, human rights, elections, military intervention and social changes. Investigation and discussion of the theories which seek to explain the determinants and consequences of these developments.
    Fulfills: Social Science distribution requirement. SOSC requirement and D in LS Core.
  
  •  

    POL 3522 - British Politics

    Credits: 4
    An examination of the structure, dynamics and processes of government in the United Kingdom.  Topics include Parliament, the executive, interest groups, policy making, constitutional change, Britain in Europe, and British foreign policy.  Several cases will be used to illustrate the political process. 
    Fulfills: SOSC in LS Core
  
  •  

    POL 3523 - Japanese Politics

    Credits: 4
    An examination of the modern political system; topics include the “consensual style” of politics, formal and informal institutions including parties and interest groups; domestic and foreign politics.
    Fulfills: Social Science distribution requirement. SOSC requirement and D in LS Core.
  
  •  

    POL 3524 - Politics of Russia and Post-Soviet States

    Credits: 4
    This course is an examination of politics in post-communist countries, with a focus on Russia and the other former Soviet States. We will develop an understanding of political, economic and social “transformations,” and discuss political and economic policies and reforms, the rule of law, corruption, and impediments to change. Through comparative analysis, we will consider the extent to which “democratization” and “marketization” have occurred in these states (and the broader question of the relationship between democracy and a market economy) and whether post-Soviet states are heading toward democracy, reverting back to Communism, stalled, or are moving towards something else, such as a new version of authoritarianism.
    Fulfills: Social Science distribution requirement. SOSC requirement in LS Core.
  
  •  

    POL 3525 - Politics of the Middle East

    Credits: 4
    This course examines the historical events and driving forces of politics in the Middle East, including colonialism, Arab nationalism, Islamism, sectarianism, and economic development, to understand their origins and importance in the region. The course will also look in-depth at the political, economic, and social structures of individual countries in order to understand how they are grappling with the challenges of terrorism, instability, economic growth, and democratization today.
    Prerequisite(s): POL1500 or faculty consent.
    Fulfills: SOSC requirement and D in LS Core.
  
  •  

    POL 3526 - Politics of the European Union

    Credits: 4
    This course will examine the history and theory of European integration as well as the inner workings of the contemporary EU political system. Moreover, some of the more important issues facing the EU will also be explored, such as: its planned eastern expansion, immigration policy, justice policy, and crime and terrorism policy.
    Fulfills: SOSC requirement in LS Core.
  
  •  

    POL 3530 - Democracy, Development and Violence

    Credits: 4
    This course examines existing theories organized in three major themes within the study of comparative politics. Topics include the functioning of political systems in established democracies, the causes and consequences of democratization, economic development, political violence and ethnic or civil war. Qualitative and quantitative approaches will be used to assess and critique the current state of knowledge in each area.
    Prerequisite(s): POL 1500 .
    Fulfills: Social Science distribution requirement. SOSC requirement in LS Core.
  
  •  

    POL 3531 - Politics of Developing Nations

    Credits: 4
    This course is a general survey of political structures, processes and problems in the developing nations, with specific examples from the experiences of representative countries.
    Fulfills: Social Science distribution requirement. SOSC requirement in LS Core.
  
  •  

    POL 3540 - International Political Economy

    Credits: 4
    This course examines how politics and economics come together in international relations and global problems. It explores why nations trade with each other and why they sometimes practice trade protectionism. It also probes the growing importance of regional economic blocks, such as the European Union and the North American Free Trade Agreement. Other topics include the rise and decline of American economic hegemony, the rise of Japan’s economic power, and global trade conflicts. The course also surveys economic reforms in the former Soviet Union and China as well as causes of underdevelopment in the developing world.
    Fulfills: Social Science distribution requirement. SOSC requirement in LS Core.
  
  •  

    POL 3541 - Cyber Security: The Intersection of Technology and Policy

    Credits: 4

    This course examines the cyber security challenges at the intersection of technology and policy. It tackles key issues for cyberspace and international relations, such as the sovereignty of states in the cyber domain, borders and boundaries in cyberspace, cyber as a public good versus private entity, and the domestic and international agreements for governing cyberspace. The course also explores the fundamental tension between freedom and security that is driving both innovation and legislation in cyberspace, drawing upon current examples in the US and beyond.  
    Fulfills: SOSC requirement in LS core.

  
  •  

    POL 4199 - Women and Politics

    Credits: 4
    The course traces the changing role of women in the political system. It examine historically important social movements, differences between men and women in political attitudes and participation, the roles that women play in government, and current public policy debates related to issues of gender.
    Fulfills: Social Science distribution requirement. SOSC requirement and D in LS Core.
  
  •  

    POL 4599(W) - Issues and Cases in United States Foreign Policy

    Credits: 4
    Using the case method of interactive learning, the course examines and compares decisions made in three different policy environments - the end of World War II, the height of the Cold War, and the post Cold War period - to stimulate discussion and analysis of the interplay of conservative and adaptive forces in United States foreign policy.
    Fulfills: Social Science distribution requirement. W in LS Core.
  
  •  

    POL 4700 - Directed Study

    Credits: Variable
    In lieu of a formal course, qualified upper class students may substitute an intensive program of reading and writing under the direction of a member of the department.
    Prerequisite(s): Minimum 3.00 GPA and permission of instructor.
    Fulfills: X in LS Core
  
  •  

    POL 4800 - Senior Seminar: Politics and the Policy Process

    Credits: 4
    This seminar course will integrate material and skills developed in the prior coursework of senior majors in the study of the policy process. Students will master the disciplinary tools for policy analysis and apply these tools to a series of cases studies of policy areas throughout the course. This course will culminate in a senior project in which students will analyze a policy area of their choosing in a major research paper and present that material to broader community.
    Prerequisite(s): POL 1100 , POL 1500 , POL 2000(W) , and senior standing or permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    POL 4850(W) - Public Service Internship

    Credits: 8
    Public Service placements include government agencies/offices in the legislative, executive and judicial branches at either the national, state or local levels of government.  Other acceptable placements include non-profits, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and in certain cases, placements could include private business organizations with appropriate governmental or public affairs activities.  Students must work at least an average of 20 hours per week in the field. In addition, students will work individually and in groups with the internship Director to produce an approximate 20 page research paper on a topic related to the internship experience.
    Prerequisite(s): Seniors and juniors with permission from the instructor.
    Fulfills: W and X in LS Core
    When Offered: Fall or Spring Session.
  
  •  

    POL 4851 - Public Service Summer Internship

    Credits: 4
    Public Service placements include government agencies/offices in the legislative, executive and judicial branches at either the national, state or local levels of government.  Other acceptable placements include non-profits, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and in certain cases, placements could include private business organizations with appropriate governmental or public affairs activities.  Students must work in the field at least an average of 15 hours per week for eight weeks, totaling 120 hours. In addition, students will work individually through email with the internship Director to produce a 10-12 page reflective research paper on a topic related to the internship experience.
    Prerequisite(s): Permission from the instructor.
    Fulfills: X in LS Core
    When Offered: Summer
  
  •  

    POL 4852 - Public Service Fall or Spring Internship

    Credits: 4

    Public Service placements include government agencies/offices in the legislative, executive and judicial branches at either the national, state or local levels of government.  Other acceptable placements include non-profits, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and in certain cases, placements could include private business organizations with appropriate governmental or public affairs activities. Students must work in the field at least an average of 10-12 hours per week for 12 weeks, for a minimum of 120 hours in the field.  In addition, students will work individually with the Internship Director to produce a 10-12 page reflective research paper on a topic related to the internship experience.  
    Prerequisite(s): Permission from the instructor.
    Fulfills: Fulfills X in LS Core.
    When Offered: Fall or Spring


Psychology

  
  •  

    PSY 1000 - Introduction to Psychology

    Credits: 4
    Provides a general overview of the wide-ranging field of psychology. Students will explore major concepts and issues in the study of human thinking, feeling, and acting. These include biological foundations of behavior and experience, how people learn and develop, how individuals perceive the world, individual differences in behavior, social influence and social relations, the difference between normative and non-normative behavior, and approaches to therapy.
    Prerequisite(s): This course is a prerequisite for all other courses in psychology.
    Fulfills: Social Science distribution requirement. SOSC requirement in LS core.
  
  •  

    PSY 1100(W) - Psychological Inquiry and Methodology

    Credits: 4
    Analysis of the varied ways psychologists ask and answer questions about the nature of psychological processes. Focuses on research philosophy, qualitative and quantitative methodology, as well as the development of critical reading and writing skills. This course should be taken as the first course after PSY 1000  by all majors, as it is designed to serve as a foundation for advanced courses in psychology.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 1000 .
    Fulfills: Institutional Writing Intensive requirement. W in LS Core.
  
  •  

    PSY 1111 - Professional Development in Psychology

    Credits: 1
    This course is designed to help students understand the various professions and career opportunities within psychology and related fields. Students will also gain a better understanding of the resources within the psychology department and across Merrimack College. Students will learn to communicate and interact in a professional manner in order to achieve and be successful in their career choice. This class will also focus on selecting the right courses, using on-campus resources to explore career options, build a resume, and develop an identity within psychology.
    Prerequisite(s): freshman or sophomore standing.
  
  •  

    PSY 1112 - Professional Development in Psychology

    Credits: 1
    This course is designed to help students understand the various professions and career opportunities within psychology and related fields. Students will also gain a better understanding of the resources within the psychology department and across Merrimack College. Students will learn to communicate and interact in a professional manner in order to achieve and be successful in their career choice. This class also focuses on off-campus opportunities to explore career options, resume building, determining their next steps after completing their degree, and developing a personal identity and professional goals using their psychology degree.
    Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing.
  
  •  

    PSY 1320 - Psychology of Identity and Purpose

    Credits: 4
    Application of psychological principles to the development of identity and purpose in young adulthood. Emphasizes the processes associated with healthy development in emerging adulthood and the implications of cultivating purpose in life. Topics include explorations in work, service, and purpose and their impact on well-being. Explores theory and empirical research.
    Fulfills: SOSC requirement in LS Core.
  
  •  

    PSY 2110 - Statistical Methods in Psychology

    Credits: 4
    Introduction to analysis of data in psychology. Emphasis on the logic, use, and interpretation of inferential statistics, including the following: correlation and regression, single-sample and two-sample t-tests, analysis of variance and chi square.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 1100(W) , MTH 1000  or placing out of MTH 1000  on the math placement test.
    Fulfills: Q in LS Core.
  
  •  

    PSY 2200 - Social Psychology

    Credits: 4
    Emphasizes the centrality of social context in our psychological processes. Explores how people think about, influence and relate to each other.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 1000 .
    Fulfills: Social Science distribution requirement. SOSC requirement in LS Core.
  
  •  

    PSY 2240 - Sport Psychology

    Credits: 4
    Examines empirical research and theory on the physical and psychological behaviors as well as the mental training components necessary to achieve peak sport performance. Explores the physical, affective, and cognitive consequences of competitive sport participation, including the psychological factors that influence sport performance, methods for enhancing sport performance, and the negative consequences of becoming an elite athlete.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 1000 .
  
  •  

    PSY 2270 - Group Dynamics

    Credits: 4
    Examines the psychological dynamics of groups, mainly in work settings, including understanding the cohesion and development of groups (e.g., learning, satisfaction, commitment), interpersonal processes and relationships that occur between group members as they work together (e.g., information sharing, competition and conflict, conformity) and motivational factors that influence group performance (e.g., groupthink, social facilitation). Explores past and present empirical research and theory.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 1000 .
  
  •  

    PSY 2280 - Organizational Psychology

    Credits: 4
    Application of psychological principles to the world of work. Emphasizes the organization as a complex social system. Applied topics include the selection, training, and evaluation of personnel. Theoretical issues include motivation, leadership, group dynamics, and organizational structure.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 1000 .
    Fulfills: Social Science distribution requirement. SOSC requirement in LS Core.
  
  •  

    PSY 2300 - Developmental Psychology

    Credits: 4
    Introduction to theory and research related to the development of psychological processes from infancy to adulthood. Analyzes the concept of development, the nature-nurture issue and the epigenetic nature of human development. Also examines cognitive, social, and personality development in their social and cultural contexts.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 1000 .
    Fulfills: Social Science distribution requirement. SOSC requirement in LS Core.
  
  •  

    PSY 2310 - Lifespan Developmental Psychology

    Credits: 4
    Explores the development of a typical human being from conception to death. Investigates patterns of change in biology, cognition, personality, social interaction, and relationships that take place throughout the lifespan. Considers several conceptual issues including progression and regression, health and illness, normality and abnormality. This course is designed primarily for students in the health sciences. It does not meet the requirements for a major in either Psychology or Human Development. Note that students who have already received credit for PSY 2300  cannot receive credit for PSY 2310.
    Fulfills: Social Science distribution requirement. SOSC requirement in LS Core.
  
  •  

    PSY 2400 - Personality

    Credits: 4
    Introduces classical and contemporary thinking on the concept of ‘personality’. Explores the contributions of several important theoretical frameworks in personality theory including psychoanalysis, phenomenology, trait theory, and learning.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 1000 .
    Fulfills: Social Science distribution requirement. SOSC requirement in LS Core.
  
  •  

    PSY 2470 - The Psychology of Trauma

    Credits: 4
    Explores the psychology of trauma and human resilience. This course explores the range of posttraumatic reactions to a variety of situations as they affect cognitive, emotional, somatic and interpersonal aspects of functioning. Students will be exposed to an overview of the etiology of and prevailing theories about PTSD. Factors contributing to the resilience to trauma as well as societal, cultural, and historical influences on views of trauma will also be discussed.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 1000 .
  
  •  

    PSY 2600 - Psychology of Happiness

    Credits: 4
    Examination of the major issues, theories, and findings in the psychological study of positive emotions and experience (Positive Psychology). Emphasis is on the scientific investigation of such topics as the nature of happiness and well-being, psychological flow, savoring, love, optimism, resilience, character strengths and virtues, and the meaningful life.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 1000 .
  
  •  

    PSY 3120 - Cognitive Psychology

    Credits: 4
    Examines major empirical and theoretical work on human information processing. Focuses on basic processes including sensory storage, pattern recognition, attention and memory. Also addresses complex cognitive processes including language, problem solving and decision making. Laboratory work will demonstrate principles discussed in class.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 1100(W) . Prerequisite that may be taken simultaneously: PSY 2110 .
    Fulfills: Social Science distribution requirement. SOSC requirement in LS Core.
    This course has separate lecture and laboratory components.
  
  •  

    PSY 3150 - Behavioral Neuroscience

    Credits: 4
    Examines the relationship between the neurophysiology of the brain and cognition. Topics include the neurophysiology of vision, touch, learning, memory, sleep, mental illness, hemispheric functions, and consciousness. The role of neuronal plasticity in altering brain structure and function after injury or learning is given special emphasis. Lab work will demonstrate principles discussed in class.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 1100(W)  and BIO 1106 .
    Corequisite(s): PSY 2110  or permission of instructor.
    Fulfills: Social Science distribution requirement. SOSC requirement in LS Core.
    This course has separate lecture and laboratory components.
  
  •  

    PSY 3250 - Cultural Psychology

    Credits: 4
    Analyzes current theories and research on culture, race and ethnicity; and explores the ways in which the individual, social relations and culture mutually constitute each other. The course analyzes the rich interconnections between language and culture, and the role of culture in the construction of self and higher-order psychological processes. Students will examine cultural groups within and outside of the United States. Also includes consideration of cultural issues in the interpretation of personal experience and the role of cultural diversity in contemporary society.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 1000 .
    Fulfills: Social Science distribution requirement. SOSC requirement and D in LS Core.
  
  •  

    PSY 3340 - Developmental Psychopathology

    Credits: 4
    Explores psychological disorders that affect children. Topics include depression, autism, suicide, hyperactivity, mental retardation and learning disabilities. Also investigates treatment modalities and theories of etiology.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 1000 .
    Fulfills: Social Science distribution requirement. SOSC requirement in LS Core.
  
  •  

    PSY 3380 - Psychology of Aging

    Credits: 4
    Investigation of the major issues, theories, and findings in the psychological study of aging. Topics are organized around the themes of the psychosocial context of aging, cognitive aspects of aging, problems of aging, and positive aspects of aging. Emphasis is on current research findings, placed in the historical and theoretical contexts of contemporary psychology.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 1000 .
    Fulfills: Social Science distribution requirement. SOSC requirement in LS Core.
  
  •  

    PSY 3410 - Abnormal Psychology

    Credits: 4
    Formerly: Adult Psychopathology
    Examination of basic issues in psychopathology. Focus on description, etiology and treatment of neurosis, character disorder, and psychosis from varying theoretical and clinical perspectives.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 1000 .
    Fulfills: Social Science distribution requirement. SOSC requirement in LS Core.
  
  •  

    PSY 3450 - Biological Bases of Abnormal Behavior

    Credits: 4
    Examines the anatomical basis of several neurological disorders and diseases. Investigates the neuroanatomical mechanisms through which diseases and disorders are thought to occur, as well as the diagnostic criteria and current treatments for each. Some of these disorders discussed will include: Autism, Sleep disorders (Insomnia, Narcolepsy), Neurodegenerative diseases (Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, Ataxia, Multiple Sclerosis), and neuropsychiatric disorders (Depression, Anxiety, Bipolar Disorder, OCD, ADHD, Schizophrenia, PTSD).
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 1000 ; BIO 1106  or PSY 3150 .
    Fulfills: Social Science distribution requirement. SOSC requirement in LS Core.
  
  •  

    PSY 4700 - Selected Topics in Psychology

    Credits: 4
    An intensive, faculty-directed research-based course.
    Prerequisite(s): Junior/Senior, consent of the instructor.
  
  •  

    PSY 4800 - Directed Study

    Credits: 1 - 4
    In lieu of a formal course, qualified advanced students may, with the approval of the department, substitute an intensive program of study under the direction of a faculty member.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 1000 ; departmental approval.
  
  •  

    PSY 4810 - Directed Research

    Credits: 4
    In lieu of a formal course, qualified advanced students may, with the approval of the department, substitute a research project under the direction of a faculty member.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 1000 , departmental approval.
    Fulfills: X in LS Core
  
  •  

    PSY 4900 - Psychology Seminar

    Credits: 4
    Senior capstone seminar on a special topic of the professor’s choosing. Students will read and discuss a series of primary and secondary texts and compose an integrative paper, written in APA format, related to the theme of the seminar.
    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing, or permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    PSY 4910 - Senior Thesis Research I

    Credits: 4
    A two-semester sequence of research and scholarship. May be started in the second semester of the junior year or in the first semester of the senior year.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 1000 , departmental approval.
    Fulfills: X in LS Core
  
  •  

    PSY 4915 - Senior Thesis Research II

    Credits: 4
    A two-semester sequence of research and scholarship. May be started in the second semester of the junior year or in the first semester of the senior year.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 1000 , departmental approval.
    Fulfills: X in LS Core
  
  •  

    PSY 4960 - Field Experience in Psychology: Adult Clinical Studies

    Credits: 4
    Two semesters of supervised participation by senior psychology majors in the activities of psychologists. Offers the possibility of placement in a variety of facilities that provide mental health services to adults.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 3410 , senior standing or permission of instructor.
    Fulfills: X in LS Core
  
  •  

    PSY 4965 - Field Experience in Psychology: Adult Clinical Studies

    Credits: 4
    Two semesters of supervised participation by senior psychology majors in the activities of psychologists. Offers the possibility of placement in a variety of facilities that provide mental health services to adults.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 3410 , senior standing or permission of instructor.
    Fulfills: X in LS Core

Religious and Theological Studies

  
  •  

    RTS 1001 - Introduction to Religious and Theological Studies

    Credits: 4
    The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the basic elements of the study of religion and theology. In this course we analyze dimensions and elements of religion in the context of diverse religious traditions using a variety of approaches. Special attention will be given to the Roman Catholic tradition and the contributions of St. Augustine.
    Fulfills: First institutional requirement in religious and theological studies. RTS in LS Core.
  
  •  

    RTS 1010 - World Religions

    Credits: 4
    This course is an introduction to a variety of the world’s religious traditions, such as Buddhism, Hinduism, Indigenous Traditions, Christianity, Islam, and Taoism. We examine origins, beliefs, practices, sacred texts, and historical and cultural aspects. Special attention will be given to Christianity and Catholicism. We will also examine St. Augustine’s life and ideas using various sources.
    Fulfills: First institutional requirement in religious and theological studies. RTS in LS Core.
  
  •  

    RTS 1050 - Quest for Meaning

    Credits: 4
    What is the meaning of life? Why am I here? What is my purpose? What constitutes a life well lived? Questions like these have plagued human beings for centuries. This course will examine a variety answers to the question, “What is the meaning of life?” Students will be exposed to a variety of religious and non-religious responses to this question and be asked to formulate their own answer to this question.
    Fulfills: First institutional requirement in religious and theological studies. RTS in LS Core.
  
  •  

    RTS 1100 - Christianity in Context

    Credits: 4
    As an introduction to Christianity, this course will investigate a number of the contexts in which it began, in which it developed, and in which we find it today. Students will study Christianity in the historical contexts within the ancient world and of ancient Judaism, in the literary contexts of the Christian Bible and its interpretation, in the intellectual context of church history, and in contemporary global contexts. In keeping with the College’s Augustinian identity, mission, and vision, this course will also highlight the contributions of St. Augustine.
    Fulfills: First institutional requirement in religious and theological studies. RTS in LS Core.
  
  •  

    RTS 1560 - Sports and Spirituality

    Credits: 4
    This course examines aspects of church history, the history of sport, philosophy, and Christian doctrine to develop a vision of sport and its relationship to Christianity. This will include an investigation of how a theology of sport can shed light on a wide range of ethical issues, including cheating and the use of performance enhancing drugs. Finally, and in keeping with the College’s Augustinian identity, mission, and vision, this course highlights the contributions of St. Augustine in order to see what lessons athletes (and sports fans) can learn from him.
    Fulfills: First institutional requirement in religious and theological studies. RTS in LS Core.
  
  •  

    RTS 1610 - Doors to the Sacred

    Credits: 4
    Search for the manifestation of the transcendent sacred in Scripture; Liturgy and Sacraments; the writings of the Church Fathers, especially Augustine; the Medieval mystics; nature; Christian art, music, and literature; the history Christian love; and social justice; especially Catholic Social Teaching.
    Fulfills: First institutional requirement in religious and theological studies. RTS in LS Core.
  
  •  

    RTS 2000 - Hinduism

    Credits: 4
    An introductory study of Hinduism that examines cultural, historical, moral, and symbolic aspects of Hinduism, including the origins of Hindu culture, iconography, ritual and the gods and goddesses of the Hindu pantheon. Uses primary and secondary sources as well as fiction and videos. Analyzes excerpts from Rig-Veda, the Upanishads and The Bhagavad Gita as well as a complete abridged version of the Ramayana. Fiction explores questions regarding Hindu culture before and during the Hindu diaspora, bringing in issues of contemporary Hinduism, inside and outside of India.
    Fulfills: Second institutional requirement in religious and theological studies. D in LS Core.
  
  •  

    RTS 2010 - Buddhism

    Credits: 4
    An introductory study of the religious tradition as it developed in India and spread throughout Asia. The course concentrates on Theravada, Zen, and Vajrayana (Tibetan) forms of Buddhism, using examination of text, ritual, and images to understand the diversity of the Buddhist world. Studies varieties of practice, monastic as well as popular, cultural influences on Buddhism, and contemporary political and social issues such as women in Buddhism and Tibetan Buddhists in exile.
    Fulfills: Second institutional requirement in religious and theological studies. D in LS Core.
 

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10