May 19, 2019  
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Electrical Engineering

  
  •  

    EEN 4715 - Special Topics in Electrical Engineering

    Credits: 4
    Reading, lectures, study and research on topics of importance in electrical engineering. This course is tailored to the interest of the faculty and students and is offered only on demand.
    Prerequisite(s): Consent of the instructor.
    Class and lecture format is variable.
  
  •  

    EEN 4750 - VLSI Design

    Credits: 4
    Introduces a hierarchical design methodology for VLSI design and presents both NMOS and CMOS technology. Circuits are designed on computer workstations for actual IC fabrication.
    Prerequisite(s): EEN 2140  and EEN 3210 .
    Five hours of lecture and laboratory a week.
  
  •  

    EEN 4805 - Directed Study

    Credits: 2
    Qualified students may propose a course of individual study and work to be conducted under the direction of a member of the department. Based on the needs of industry, special topics in a particular research area may be proposed by the faculty as well.
    Prerequisite(s): Consent of the instructor.
  
  •  

    EEN 4815 - Directed Study

    Credits: 4
    Qualified students may propose a course of individual study and work to be conducted under the direction of a member of the department. Based on the needs of industry, special topics in a particular research area may be proposed by the faculty as well.
    Prerequisite(s): Consent of the instructor.
  
  •  

    EEN 4960 - Design Project I

    Credits: 2
    Design project I and II form a project-oriented laboratory drawing on the student’s prior work in electronics, computer systems, control systems, communication or energy conversion. In the first semester, the student formulates a design project (or research study) in consultation with the instructor. Project plans are developed through a phase gate development model to the point of design review. Students participate in planning and design phases as technical reviewers in addition to their individual design responsibility.
    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing.
    Fulfills: X in LS Core
    Two hours of lecture per week.
  
  •  

    EEN 4970 - Design Project II

    Credits: 2
    Design project I and II form a project-oriented laboratory drawing on the student’s prior work in electrical engineering. Tasks such as layout, fabrication, coding and test are generally required as students complete project implementation. Project developments complete the phase gate model with students serving as the reviewers and technical resources in addition to their individual responsibility. Project presentations complete the capstone experience.
    Prerequisite(s): EEN 4960 .
    Fulfills: X in LS Core
    Two hours of lecture per week.
  
  •  

    EEN 5265 - Engineering Management

    Credits: 4
    An introductory course in the management of technology-based companies combining reading, lecture, case study and project teaching methods. The course presents introductory material from the areas of accounting and financial principles, R&D management, project development, management practices and human factors. Language and effective communication principles will be a recurring theme throughout the course.
    Prerequisite(s): Approval by Advisor, and senior or graduate student standing.
    Four hours of lecture a week.
  
  •  

    EEN 5555 - Power Engineering and Power Quality

    Credits: 4
    Course covers Phasors, real and reactive power in single phase and poly-phase AC circuits; balance three phase circuits; power in three phase circuits analysis; introduction to power quality; power quality problems and solution such as, electrical transients, harmonics, voltage regulation, and power factor including harmonics power filter design. Magnetic circuits and introduction to transformer and its circuit analysis, such as, open and short circuits test are covered. Circuit concepts and analysis for AC/DC motors and generators, building electrical systems, such as, building design and motor circuit design.
    Prerequisite(s): EEN 3430  or equivalent.
    Four hours of lecture a week.

English

  
  •  

    ENG 1060 - Horror Fiction

    Credits: 4
    This introductory-level course will examine our culture’s fascination with narratives involving the supernatural, the deviant and the macabre. It will challenge students to identify the variety of ways in which classic and contemporary horror stories manage to haunt their readers.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
    Three hours a week.
  
  •  

    ENG 1065 - Travelers’ Tales

    Credits: 4
    This course explores a wide variety of modern and contemporary travel narratives, examining the ways in which travel writers compose their stories and reshape the conventions that inform this genre.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
    Three hours a week.
  
  •  

    ENG 1080 - Superheroes: A Modern Mythology

    Credits: 4
    This course will explore the origins of superheroes in comic books and examine how the superhero has escaped the confines of a trivialized medium to replace traditional heroes in American culture. How do superheroes reflect older mythologies but also respond to the needs and interests of modern society? We will consider not only printed comics but also new expressions of the characters in other areas, such as television, film, and digital media.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
    Three hours a week.
  
  •  

    ENG 1200 - Inequality & Justice in Life/Literature

    Credits: 4
    This first-year interdisciplinary course examines issues in the justice system and society at-large, through the lens of Criminology and literature. We will look at a variety of justice-related issues, cases, and social movements in conjunction with the art and literature that is inspired by and results from them. Race, gender, and class inequality within the U.S. justice system, perceptions of criminals and victims, immigration, genocide, domestic violence, and mass incarceration are some of the topics we will cover.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
    Three hours a week.
  
  •  

    ENG 1500 - Major British and World Authors

    Credits: 4
    One-semester course designed to introduce students to British and World literature through selected works of writers both classic and modern, as well as others from continental European and non-European traditions.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
    Three hours a week.
  
  •  

    ENG 1550 - Major American Authors

    Credits: 4
    One-semester course designed to introduce students to American literature through the study of writers representing a range of cultures and literary traditions.
    Fulfills: Humanities distribution requirement. AL in LS Core.
    Three hours a week.
  
  •  

    ENG 2050 - Introduction to Literary Studies

    Credits: 4
    This course introduces students to such traditional literary genres as fiction, poetry, and drama, as well as newer and emerging forms such as the graphic novel, creative non-fiction, digital storytelling, and film. Emphasis is given to teaching students to read closely and to write analytically. The course also familiarizes students with a variety of interpretive strategies. Students leave the course recognizing the value of close reading and self-conscious interpretation.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
    Three hours a week.
  
  •  

    ENG 2055 - Sophomore Seminar in English

    Credits: 4
    Required of all English majors, the sophomore seminar is a special topics course designed to provide students with the opportunity to: 1) learn to read literature actively within the context of the discipline of English studies; 2) Study a variety of literary and cultural forms of expression; 3) gain experience in using a variety of interpretive approaches to reading texts; 4) gain practice in the intensive oral and written exchange of ideas and analysis promoted by the seminar format, as necessary preparation for the more advanced work they will undertake upper-level courses in the English program, particularly the senior capstone seminar. Course assignments emphasize the fundamental importance of conversation among scholars within the field of English studies and collaboration among students and between students and faculty. The sophomore seminar is offered each spring semester and is taught by the full-time English faculty on a rotating basis.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
    Three hours a week.
  
  •  

    ENG 2100 - History of Film

    Credits: 4
    This course will offer an exploratory survey of the history of cinema, detailing the major movements, directors, studios and genres from the 1890s to the present. Over the past 125 years, film has arguably been the most influential medium in American and global culture. From the advent of sound and color to digital filmmaking, it has also continually reinvented itself, as it adapts to changes in technology and culture, finding new means of presentation, expression and storytelling. This course offers a journey through time, covering the birth of film; the Hollywood studio era; the postwar era; the new Hollywood era; the blockbuster era; and the digital area. We will watch a range of representative films within these historical contexts, analyzing their techniques, forms, genres, and meanings.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
  
  •  

    ENG 2150 - Introduction to Creative Writing

    Credits: 4
    Introduction to Creative Writing introduces the main genres of creative writing, including poetry, memoir, and fiction.  In addition to producing their own creative forms such as poems, song lyrics, literary memoir, and short stories, students will study the works of contemporary and canonical authors in each genre. Classwork includes the workshopping of both short and longer projects and will culminate in a portfolio of revised work.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
  
  •  

    ENG 2770 - Literature and Film

    Credits: 4
    Study of the transformation of works of literature into film, focusing on the different techniques used in cinema, literature, and the relationship of film to traditional literature. Class will focus on four major films and the literature they are based on.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
    Three hours a week.
  
  •  

    ENG 2780 - From Comics to Film

    Credits: 4
    This course will study the impact of graphic novels on contemporary cinema. It will also study the unique art form of comics.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
  
  •  

    ENG 3100 - Beowulf and Old English Literature

    Credits: 4
    Study of Beowulf and other poetic and prose works of the period 700-1100 in translation as well as in Old English. Attention to these works in their historical and cultural contexts and to the development of the English language. Before 1800.
    Prerequisite(s): FYW 1050 .
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
    Three hours a week.
  
  •  

    ENG 3140 - Chaucer and Middle English Literature

    Credits: 4
    Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales and other poetic and prose works of the period 1100-1485 in Middle English and in translation. Attention to these works in their historical and cultural contexts and to the development of the English language. Before 1800.
    Prerequisite(s): FYW 1050 .
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
    Three hours a week.
  
  •  

    ENG 3141 - Chaucer in Popular Culture

    Credits: 4
    Chaucer’s tales of corrupt clerics, over-sexed students, fatuous suitors, unfaithful wives, and jealous husbands constitute some of the best stories told in English. This course will explore versions of Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, including all sorts of translations-good and bad–for adults and children, as well as film, stage, musical (including rap), and comics versions of the Tales, especially those meant for American audiences. The course includes opportunities for students to create their own versions of Chaucer’s work. Before or After 1800.
    Prerequisite(s): FYW 1050 .
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
    Three hours a week.
  
  •  

    ENG 3220 - Revenge and Romance: Renaissance Drama

    Credits: 4
    Through close study of selected plays produced in England from 1590-1642 by Kyd, Marlowe, Jonson, Shakespeare, Webster and Ford, this course examines the literary and theatrical dimensions of Renaissance drama, with particular attention to how the plays dramatize contradictory forces in English Renaissance culture and to placing Shakespeare’s plays in the context of drama by his contemporaries. Before 1800.
    Prerequisite(s): FYW 1050 .
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
    Three hours a week.
  
  •  

    ENG 3250 - Shakespearean Drama

    Credits: 4
    This course explores Shakespearean drama through close study of six plays selected from among the tragedies, comedies, histories, and romances, with emphasis on how our understanding of the plays is shaped by literary genre, early modern theatrical conventions, and the cultural contradictions of the English Renaissance. Before 1800.
    Prerequisite(s): FYW 1050 .
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
    Three hours a week.
  
  •  

    ENG 3280 - Milton and the Culture of Revolution

    Credits: 4
    This course examines Milton’s Paradise Lost and other poetic and prose works of seventeenth century England in their historical context. Addresses the impact of the English Civil War on the literary imagination, with special attention to political and religious controversy. Before 1800.
    Prerequisite(s): FYW 1050 .
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
    Three hours a week.
  
  •  

    ENG 3300 - Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature

    Credits: 4
    Study of writers and works of the period 1660-1800 in their historical and cultural context. Addresses the rise and decline of satire and the emergence of Preromanticism, with special attention to the role of genre in shaping literary expression. Emphasis on authors such as Behn, Swift, Pope, and Johnson. Before 1800.
    Prerequisite(s): FYW 1050 .
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
  
  •  

    ENG 3320 - Jane Austen and the Eighteenth-Century Novel

    Credits: 4
    This course examines the emergence of the English novel as a literary form, with special focus on the achievement of Jane Austen.  Addresses the impact of historical context, the development of narrative technique, and the ongoing relevance of Austen in popular culture today.   Includes novelists such as Daniel Defoe, Samuel Richardson, and Henry Fielding.  Before 1800. Prerequisite: FYW1050. Fulfills AL in LS Core.  Three hours a week.
    Fulfills: Fulfills AL in LS Core
  
  •  

    ENG 3350 - Sex, Race, and Empire: 1660-1814

    Credits: 4
    This course examines the emergence of women and black male writers into the world of public authorship in England during the Restoration and eighteenth-century. Addresses questions of gender, constructions of race, and impact of mercantile expansion on the literary imagination. Includes such writers as Cavendish, Behn, Equiano, Wollstonecraft, and Austen. Before 1800.
    Prerequisite(s): FYW 1050 .
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
    Three hours a week.
  
  •  

    ENG 3360 - The Undead Eighteenth Century: Origins of English Gothic Literature

    Credits: 4
    This course examines the origins of English gothic verse and fiction, from the Graveyard Poets through Jane Austen. Attention to the formal conventions of the genre, focusing on the ways in which the supernatural mediates the rational and the irrational, sin and salvation, and licit and illicit sexuality, as well as the persistence of the gothic in popular culture today. Before 1800.
    Prerequisite(s): FYW 1050 .
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
    Three hours a week.
  
  •  

    ENG 3400 - Road Trips

    Credits: 4
    Featuring the work of British Romantic writers, this course examines the cultural, political, and personal importance of movement through time, space and imagination. After 1800.
    Prerequisite(s): FYW 1050 .
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
    Three hours a week.
  
  •  

    ENG 3550 - Modern American Literature

    Credits: 4
    Study of American literature produced by American authors beginning at the turn of the century within the social and cultural context of the period. Emphasis on writers such as Gertrude Stein, Mina Loy, William Faulkner, Robert Frost, William Carlos Williams, Abraham Cahan, Sterling Brown, and Langston Hughes. After 1800.
    Prerequisite(s): FYW 1050 .
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
    Three hours a week.
  
  •  

    ENG 3620 - Contemporary American Literature

    Credits: 4
    Study of American literature since the 1960s as a reflection of the social and cultural upheavals of the period. Emphasis on writers such as Dubus, Tan, Wilson, Harjo, Banks, Cisneros, DeLillo, Rich, and Mamet. After 1800.
    Prerequisite(s): FYW 1050 .
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
    Three hours a week.
  
  •  

    ENG 3640 - The Eighties: Literature, Film, and Culture in the Blockbuster Era

    Credits: 4


    The 1980s saw the beginning of a new kind of culture in America - what might be termed the “blockbuster era.” It was an era of big things: big movies, events, crazes, hair. Some historians have described it as the height of the monoculture: the last decade when nearly everyone experienced a cultural event together, whether the final episode of M.A.S.H., the premiere of Michael Jackson’s Thriller, or the phenomenon of E.T. While the decade is often characterized as the Reagan Era due to the undeniable influence of the two-term president, pop culture ruled the world. It was the decade of MTV and VHS home videos, Apple computers and Nintendo, Sony Walkmans and synthesizers. It has often been labeled an era of greed, conspicuous consumption, and obsession with image; yet this only tells part of the story. This course offers an in-depth exploration of the cross-currents and competing narratives of the Blockbuster Era. Taking cues from its period of study, the course is interdisciplinary in nature, looking at a wide range of “texts,” including novels, films, music videos, commercials, short stories, articles, and song lyrics. Drawing on such sources we will investigate a number of issues against the landscape of the Eighties, including nostalgia, identity, the cold war, urban decay, the AIDS crisis, gender bending, and futurism. These topics will not only allow us to better understand one of the most influential decades of the 20th century, but also to draw connections to the world we live in today.

     


    Prerequisite(s): FYW1050
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core

  
  •  

    ENG 3680 - World Drama: The Theatrical Impulse Then and Now

    Credits: 4
    This course traces the theatrical impulse in Western culture by studying the development of drama as a major literary form, from the classical drama of ancient Greece and the European medieval and early modern theater to works from the American and contemporary world stages. Attention to genre, theater history, and the cultural work that drama performs at different moments in its history as well as to how plays are shaped by theater spaces and staging conventions. Readings from such playwrights as Aeschylus, Shakespeare, Ibsen, Brecht, Beckett, Churchill, and Vogel. Before or After 1800.
    Prerequisite(s): FYW 1050 .
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
    Three hours a week.
  
  •  

    ENG 3682 - Mixing & Mashing Monsters: From Beowulf to Tolkien, Crichton, & Back Again

    Credits: 4
    Study of literary remixing centering on Beowulf and the poem’s linked remixes and mash-ups, ranging from literary works in other genres, such as those by J. R. R. Tolkien and Michael Crichton, to versions and adaptations in other media arts such as film, comics, video and board games. Some attention to remix theory and copyright issues in digital culture, as well as opportunities for students to create their own literary remixes. Before or After 1800.
    Prerequisite(s): FYW 1050 .
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
  
  •  

    ENG 3730 - Modern American Poetry

    Credits: 4
    As developments in the realms of science, industry, and philosophy came to overturn many of the most widely held truths of the 19th century, they also required artists to, in Ezra Pound’s words, “make it new.” This course will focus on High Modernism alongside the modernisms of the disenfranchised. Writers may include Eliot, Pound, Stevens, Hughes, Loy, Robinson, Frost, Lowell, and Brown. After 1800.
    Prerequisite(s): FYW 1050 .
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
    Three hours a week.
  
  •  

    ENG 3735 - Hollywood’s America: Gender, Race and Class in American Cinema

    Credits: 4
    Movies are undeniably the most popular art form of the 20th and 21st centuries and, as a result, provide important insights into the American experience. This course will study landmark Hollywood films that helped to shape modern American identity. After 1800.
    Prerequisite(s): FYW 1050 .
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
    Three hours a week.
  
  •  

    ENG 3745 - Green Screen: Environmental Film

    Credits: 4
    This course examines ecological themes through the medium of film. What ideas do films communicate about the natural world? What impact do they have on audiences? What can close, critical readings of these movies reveal? We will explore such questions through three main branches of cinema: narrative feature films, documentaries, and music videos. Films will include Blade Runner, The Emerald Forest, Jurassic Park, Earth Song, An Inconvenient Truth, Into the Wild, I Heart Huckabees, Avatar, Waste Land, and Wall-E.
    Prerequisite(s): FYW 1050 .
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
  
  •  

    ENG 3750 - Gods and Monsters: The Shelley Circle

    Credits: 4
    This course examines the ways in which British romantic writers P. B. Shelley, Mary Shelley, and Lord Byron used their writing to expose the deformities that issue when repression perverts imagination and sexuality. After 1800.
    Prerequisite(s): FYW 1050 .
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
    Three hours per week.
  
  •  

    ENG 3755 - Special Topics: World Cinema

    Credits: 4
    World cinema by its very nature is transnational, as local and gobal converns interact, and international production and distribution, enhanced since the 1990’s by an ever evolving and borderless digital technology, underscore the increasing globalization of the film industry.  This special topics course will focus on specific dimensions of world cinema such as Nordic Noir, New Wave Cinema, Third (World) Cinema, and Auteur Cinema. Students will explore films from specific areas of the world, and also study the global dynamics of the film industry. Finally, they will learn how film, as well as other dimensions of pop culture, functions as sites for collective debate over transnational politics and relations. 
    Prerequisite(s): FYW1050
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
  
  •  

    ENG 3760 - Science Fiction Cinema

    Credits: 4
    Perhaps no other genre is as popular in contemporary film as science fiction – from franchises like Star Wars and Hunger Games to blockbusters like Avatar and Interstellar to groundbreaking television series’ like Westworld. One reason for this popularity is that sci fi films are often spectacles that display the most dazzling, cutting-edge special effects and visual tableaus. More than mere entertainment, however, the best science fiction cinema has always posed profound questions about our place in the universe, what makes us human, and where we are headed (for better or worse). Science fiction films, that is, compel us to imagine beyond the day-to-day, beyond the ordinary. They induce a sense of awe, wonder, sometimes even trepidation about the possibilities of the future. This course offers a journey through the genre, from the earliest short films to the most recent sci fi classics.  We will situate each film within its historical, cultural, and critical context, not only analyzing its techniques, forms, and aesthetic innovations, but also its messaging and meanings.
    Prerequisite(s): FYW1050
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
  
  •  

    ENG 3780 - Poets of New England

    Credits: 4
    Study of New England poets and their influence upon the evolution of a distinctly American poetry. Particular emphasis upon the significance of New England landscape as subject matter, inspiration, and metaphor. Writers may include Robert Frost, Emily Dickinson, Anne Bradstreet, E. A. Robinson, Robert Lowell, and Sylvia Plath. After 1800.
    Prerequisite(s): FYW 1050 .
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
    Three hours a week.
  
  •  

    ENG 3790 - Poe, Hawthorne, and the American Short Story

    Credits: 4
    Study of the influence of Edgar Allan Poe and Nathaniel Hawthorne upon the emergence of the modern short story, as well as cultural changes within 19th-century America that contributed to the increased market for this new genre. After 1800.
    Prerequisite(s): FYW 1050 .
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
    Three hours a week.
  
  •  

    ENG 3820 - Twentieth-Century Drama and Performance by Women

    Credits: 4
    This course studies a range of twentieth-century female dramatists, exploring how their plays represent issues that are crucial to women’s lives, including identity, family, marriage, motherhood, beauty/body image, race, sexuality, and social class, along with how they both embrace and challenge traditional dramatic forms and styles. Readings include works by African-American, Latina, European-American, and British writers and dramatic forms such as the realistic ensemble drama, the one-woman show, mixed media presentations, and theater of the absurd. After 1800.
    Prerequisite(s): FYW 1050 .
    Fulfills: AL and D in LS Core
    Three hours a week
  
  •  

    ENG 3830 - American Indian Renaissance


    Study of the flourishing of Native American poetry and fiction since 1967 when N. Scott Momaday received the Pulitzer Prize for House Made of Dawn. Writers such as Leslie Silko, Louise Erdrich, N. Scott Momaday, Linda Hogan, Simon Ortiz, and Wendy Rose. After 1800. 
    Prerequisite(s): FYW1050
    Fulfills: AL and D in LS Core
  
  •  

    ENG 3860 - Beyond The Godfather: Italian American Women Writers

    Credits: 4
    Moving beyond the cultural stereotypes that associate Italian Americans mainly with food and organized crime, this course examines the intersections of gender, ethnicity, and writing in autobiography, fiction, poetry, and memoir by Italian American women authors, focusing on how these writers have discovered, expressed, and redefined their problematic identities within American and Italian American culture as they grapple with such issues as the immigration experience, Old World/New World conflicts, Italian American stereotypes, family, motherhood, marriage, sexuality, beauty/body image, and work. After 1800.
    Prerequisite(s): FYW 1050 .
    Fulfills: AL and D in LS Core
    Three hours a week.
  
  •  

    ENG 3870 - Literature of the Harlem Renaissance

    Credits: 4
    This course will approach the study of literary modernism (roughly 1890-1940) by focusing on the works of the Harlem Renaissance. We will examine the diversity of African American identities represented in this literature and consider how the Harlem Renaissance helps to redefine America during this fraught historical moment. Readings to be selected from such authors as Langston Hughes, Nella Larsen, Claude McKay, W.E.B. Du Bois, and Zora Neale Hurston. After 1800.
    Prerequisite(s): FYW 1050 .
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
    Three hours a week.
  
  •  

    ENG 3880 - Michael Jackson: Reading the King of Pop as Cultural Text

    Credits: 4
    As a pop star who reached unprecedented levels of fame, artistic success, and wealth in the 1970s, 80s and 90s, and who was subsequently ridiculed, criminalized, and vilified by the very society that elevated him to such heights, Michael Jackson constitutes a most complex and revealing cultural text. This course will “read” Michael Jackson’s work as a musician, songwriter, dancer, and visual artist in order to explore the ways in which Jackson’s artistic production and cultural presence intersect with and comment on late twentieth-century ideas of gender, race, sexuality, media/celebrity culture, and the role of the popular artist in society. The primary objects of study in the course are Jackson’s short musical films, but course materials will also include popular culture theory, recent scholarship on Jackson, and selections from Jackson’s recorded music, filmed concerts, television appearances, autobiographical writings, interviews, public statements, and press coverage. After 1800.
    Prerequisite(s): FYW 1050 .
    Fulfills: AL and D in LS Core
    Three hours a week.
  
  •  

    ENG 3900 - Creative Writing: Fiction

    Credits: 4
    This course is designed for students interested in working with fiction writing. The first half of the course involves analyzing selected short stories and working with focused creative writing exercises. The second half of the course is set up as a fiction workshop, with students presenting their fiction to small groups and to the class as a whole.
    Prerequisite(s): FYW 1050 .
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
    Three hours a week.
  
  •  

    ENG 3902 - Creative Writing: Non-Fiction

    Credits: 4
    Introduces the genre of creative nonfiction. Students will study and produce prose forms such as autobiography, literary memoir, imaginative non-fiction (non-fiction purposefully incorporating fiction); literary journalism. The latter half of the course will be devoted to workshop, in which students read and respond to each other’s longer nonfiction projects.
    Prerequisite(s): FYW 1050 .
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
  
  •  

    ENG 3920 - Creative Writing: Poetry

    Credits: 4
    This course is designed for students interested in writing poetry. The course will involve reading poetry as well as working with focused creative writing exercises and the reading and discussion of student’s poetry in workshop format.
    Prerequisite(s): FYW 1050 .
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
    Three hours a week.
  
  •  

    ENG 4000 - Advanced Creative Writing Workshop: Fiction

    Credits: 4
    Discussion and critical evaluation of students’ fiction pieces in workshop format. Designed for students with a previous background in fiction writing and an understanding of the conventions of the genre in which they are working.
    Prerequisite(s): FYW 1050 , ENG 3900 , or permission of instructor.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
    Three hours a week.
  
  •  

    ENG 4102 - The New England Shore

    Credits: 4
    This seminar course will focus on the work of modern and contemporary naturalist writers who have found their inspiration in the New England coastal landscape. Course work includes field visits to many of the seashore locales featured in the works students will be studying. After 1800.
    Prerequisite(s): FYW 1050 .
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
  
  •  

    ENG 4850 - Public Service Fall or Spring Internship

    Credits: 8
    As participant observers, students study theoretical and practical approaches to government by serving as research and staff aides to leaders in the public sector at the federal, state or local levels of government. Students must work at least an average of 20 hours per week in the field. In addition, students will work individually and in groups with the internship Director to produce a 20-25 page research paper on a topic related to the internship experience.
    Prerequisite(s): Seniors and juniors with permission from the Instructor and English Dept. Chair. Four (4) of the eight credits earned for this internship may be used to fulfill an English major Elective requirement.
    Fulfills: X in LS Core
  
  •  

    ENG 4851 - Public Service Summer Internship

    Credits: 4
    As participant observers, students study theoretical and practical approaches to government by serving as research and staff aides to leaders in the public sector at the federal, state or local levels of government. Students must work in the field at least an average of 15 hours per week for eight weeks, totaling 120 hours. In addition, students will work individually through email with the internship Director to produce a 10-15 page reflective research paper on a topic related to the internship experience.
    Prerequisite(s): Seniors and juniors with permission from the Instructor and English Dept. Chair. The four (4) credits earned for this internship may be used to fulfill an English major Elective requirement.
    Fulfills: X in LS Core
  
  •  

    ENG 4852 - Co-Curricular Internship

    Credits: 0
    Qualified, intermediate or advanced students working under the supervision of full-time English Department faculty in any one of a variety of non-credit bearing co-curricular internship opportunities offered as part of the English program, including: English Department Newsletter Production Board, Senior Spring Symposium Production Board, Writers House Programming Board, Field-Research. Through hands-on experience, the co-curricular internship cultivates in students greater knowledge and skill at performing core tasks relevant to publishing, event planning, marketing, journalism and more. 10-15 hours per week. No-credit.
  
  •  

    ENG 4900 - Directed Study

    Credits: 4
    Intensive program of reading/writing under the direction of a full time member of the department. Provides qualified seniors and second-semester juniors with an opportunity to work in depth on a focused topic not covered by the usual departmental course offerings. Requires a formal detailed proposal approved by the faculty members and the department chair.
    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2050 , at least three additional courses in the major, a minimum GPA of 3.0 in the major, or permission of the instructor, in addition to the approval of the chair and consent of the members of the department under whose supervision the Directed Study will be conducted.
  
  •  

    ENG 4950(W) - Senior Seminar

    Credits: 4
    Study of selected texts and contexts in seminar format to foster integration of knowledge concerning literature and language as well as to explore issues relating to the creation and interpretation of texts and the current status of English studies. Required for English majors.
    Prerequisite(s): FYW 1050 , ENG 2050 , and senior status.
    Fulfills: W in LS Core
    Three hours a week.

Environmental Studies and Sustainability

  
  •  

    ESS 1050 - Environmental Studies and Sustainability Gateway

    Credits: 4
    This gateway course is required of all majors and is an interdisciplinary introduction to environmental studies and sustainability from the perspectives of the natural sciences, the social sciences, business and ethics to the range of environmental problems confronting the globe today. The course provides an overview of both global and regional issues and discusses different approaches to achieving sustainability.
  
  •  

    ESS 3350 - Sustainable Business Practices

    Credits: 4
    The course provides students with an integrative approach to learning the theory and application of sustainable business practices. Students will gain awareness of current issues in business with regard to sustainable management. Students will learn various technical, organizational and operational aspects of sustainable business practices through active learning opportunities, case discussions, technological applications and external activities.
    Prerequisite(s): BUS 1100 .
  
  •  

    ESS 3450 - Sustainable Energy

    Credits: 4
    The objective of Sustainable Energy is to introduce the student to the complex problem of providing sufficient energy without damaging the environment, affecting society and threatening the future of the next generations. Our current path of growing energy needs appears to be unsustainable for the long term. This course will explore the choices we can make now to optimize our future energy supply.
    Prerequisite(s): ESS 1050 .
  
  •  

    ESS 3550 - Environmental Policy

    Credits: 4
    This course will examine environmental issues from a policy perspective. The course will focus on both domestic and global environmental issues with an emphasis on national, state and local policy. We will examine both how values influence environmental policy and how different policy approaches, including regulation, taxing, law and incentives, influence values. The course will focus on what constitutes effective environmental policy and how we achieve it to protect the environment and promote sustainable systems. In addition, students will develop and apply knowledge of environmental analysis in planning and policy making. This examination will be conducted through numerous hands-on exercises focusing on environmental issues in New England. The main course goals are to build student competencies in the political, organizational, scientific and economic drivers shaping past and current environmental policy and policy debates. At the conclusion of this class, each student should be able to place the efforts for clean air and water, sustainable growth, biodiversity protection as well as a sustainable and equitable climate, in institutional, historical, theoretical, and informal contexts.
    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing in the ESS major or consent of the instructor.
  
  •  

    ESS 4820 - Senior Seminar/Sustainability Project I

    Credits: 2
    Literature, studio and/or field research to identify, analyze or develop solutions for environmental problems. The project may include more than one student and will be directed by faculty and various project partners. Students are required to elect both ESS 4820 and ESS 4920 .
    Prerequisite(s): Senior Environmental Studies and Sustainability major standing and consent of instructor.
  
  •  

    ESS 4850 - Community Internship

    Credits: 4
    Students work in environmental studies and sustainability internship placements that match the students’ academic program, interests and skills. Internships can be arranged across a wide array of public and private organizations focused on environmental policy, business, research, regulation, enforcement, ethics, education or other areas in the student’s interest. Students must work a minimum number of 100 hours at the placement site and/or doing the work required by the internship. A classroom component is included and designed to provide an opportunity for analysis and discussion of the internship experience with other students and faculty. Internships are overseen by the Program Director.
    Note: Typically taken in the junior year.
  
  •  

    ESS 4920 - Senior Seminar/Sustainability Project II

    Credits: 2
    This is a continuation of ESS 4001. The project may include more than one student and will be directed by faculty and various project partners. A senior project, including a final research report/paper/poster/demonstration, completes the two-semester course.
    Prerequisite(s): ESS 4820 .
  
  •  

    OBR 1000COOP - Cooperative Education Experience

    Credits: 0
    Opportunities are often three, six, or twelve month positions, and vary depending on the major and desired time until graduation. Students may participate in the fall, spring or summer semester. Interested students should contact their career advisor in the O’Brien Center for more information or to discuss opportunities.
    Prerequisite(s): (1) Must have completed a minimum of 60 credit hours to participate, (2) Must have a 2.0 minimum GPA, (3) Must complete a minimum of 30 hours per week for a minimum of 3 months, (4) Must register the cooperative education with the O’Brien Center using Advantage, (5) Student and site supervisor must set learning goals for the cooperative education experience, (6) Student and site supervisor must complete a post co-op reflection of the experience. Student must have approval through the O’Brien Center with oversight from the O’Brien Center Faculty Advisory Board.
    Fulfills: X in LS Core.

Visual and Performing Arts

  
  •  

    FAA 1210 - Basic Drawing I

    Credits: 4
    An approach to drawing and its values through studio experience. Seeing is emphasized through a series of exercises involving figure and still-life drawing primarily concentrating on line. Light and dark values are investigated later in the course. Abstraction is briefly considered.
    Fulfills: Humanities distribution requirement. AL in LS core.
  
  •  

    FAA 1230 - 2-Dimensional Design

    Credits: 4
    Introduction to the vocabulary and grammar of visual composition. The basic design elements of figure-ground, point, line, shape, tone, color, texture, pattern and space will be explored through the project assignments. Concept, content, composition, and craft will be looked at as interlocking components.
    Fulfills: Humanities distribution requirement. AL in LS Core.
  
  •  

    FAA 1270 - Basic Painting I

    Credits: 4
    An introduction to the principles of painting through direct studio experience with an emphasis on the plastic nature of painting and basic pictorial values. Attention to the needs of individual students.
    Fulfills: Humanities distribution requirement. AL in LS Core.
  
  •  

    FAA 1310 - The Nature of Music: The Art of Listening

    Credits: 4
    A course designed to introduce students to the art of active listening to music. A multiplicity of musical styles and genres are employed in the course as means toward the ultimate goal of developing deeper, more aware listening habits in students’ daily life. The course will include exploration of western classical genres, including opera and the symphony; popular styles like jazz and rock; and folk musics of the world, including the Americas. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement.
    Fulfills: Humanities distribution requirement. AL and X in LS Core.
  
  •  

    FAA 1320 - History of Rock & Roll

    Credits: 4
    This course covers the history of rock music in Western culture, focusing mainly on British and American contributions to the style. It begins with an overview of the musics that were predecessors of rock, including early blues, jazz and rhythm and blues, continues through the birth of rock ‘n’ roll in the 1950, and traces developments throughout the second half of the 20th century and beyond, culminating in a review of current trends. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement.
    Fulfills: Humanities distribution requirement. AL and X in LS Core.
  
  •  

    FAA 1330 - Survey of American Music

    Credits: 4
    A survey of American music from the colonial era to the present, examining folk, popular, art, sacred, and secular music traditions in the United States within their cultural and historical contexts. A comprehensive survey of major trends in American musical history and a collective critical assessment of how Americans tell the story of their own musical heritage. Emphasis is placed on discussion, critical assessment of sources, and developing active listening skills. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement.
    Fulfills: Humanities distribution requirement. AL and X in LS Core.
  
  •  

    FAA 1350 - Pep Band

    Credits: 0 or 1
    The Merrimack College Pep Band is a performing ensemble representing the students, faculty, staff, alumni, and fans in spirited fashion. This ensemble performs at all home Men’s Hockey games in the Lawler Arena with the exception of games occurring over winter break.
    Note: Students may register for any combination of ensembles up to a total of 8 credits.
  
  •  

    FAA 1351 - Jazz Ensemble

    Credits: 0 or 1
    This course is designed to give students experience rehearsing and performing in a large jazz ensemble. Development of jazz interpretation, ensemble skills, improvisational skills, and techniques specific to the jazz idion are explored in depth. Pieces are selected to meet the individual needs of the group and are representative of a wide variety of jazz styles.
    Note: Students may register for any combination of ensembles up to a total of 8 credits.
  
  •  

    FAA 1352 - Concert Choir

    Credits: 0 or 1
    This course is designed to give students experience in rehearsing and performing in a vocal ensemble. Development of basic vocal techniques, ensemble skills, solfeggio skills, and techniques specific to vocal music are explored. Musical compositions are selected to expose the students to a wide variety of musical idioms.
    Note: Students may register for any combination of ensembles up to a total of 8 credits.
  
  •  

    FAA 1353 - Merrimack Schola

    Credits: 0 or 1
    This ensemble course gives both singers and instrumentalists experience in rehearsing and performing music in a liturgical context. The Merrimack Schola ensemble provides music for the 5 pm Sunday Mass in Austin Chapel, as well as music for special occasions, including the Baccalaureate Mass. All singers are welcome who wish to sing and grow in musical understanding. The ability to read music is not required. Basic vocal techniques, ensemble techniques, solfege ability, and musicological and liturgical context will be developed in this course. Instrumentalists who have the ability to read music fluently are welcome.
    Note: Students may register for any combination of ensembles up to a total of 8 credits.
  
  •  

    FAA 1360 - Group Guitar Class

    Credits: 2
    This course will allow beginning guitar students to develop skills sufficient to accompany themselves and others. Students will develop the ability to perform a basic repertory of traditional, folk and popular songs in several keys, with and without printed music.
    Note: New course
  
  •  

    FAA 1361 - Group Voice Class

    Credits: 2
    This course will allow students to develop basic skills in voice, especially as related to group singing. Students will develop the ability to communicate using a basic repertory of traditional, folk, and popular songs.
    Note: New course
  
  •  

    FAA 1362 - Group Percussion Class

    Credits: 2
    This course will allow beginning students to develop the knowledge of and performance ability on percussion instruments sufficient to facilitate rhythm-based musical experiences for individuals and groups.
     

    Note: New course
  
  •  

    FAA 1372 - Individual Music Lessons Voice

    Credits: 0 or 1
    Formerly: Individual Music Lessons are designed to give students the chance to create music in an experiential, individualized learning environment. Students will work in a one to one setting with the instructor. The course will meet for 10 hours per semester at a time to be arranged. Due to the individualized instruction of this Applied Instruction, a course fee of $650 per semester will be billed in addition to standard tuition.
    Note: New course
  
  •  

    FAA 1373 - Individual Music Lessons Drums

    Credits: 0 or 1
    Individual Music Lessons are designed to give students the chance to create music in an experiential, individualized learning environment. Students will work in a one to one setting with the instructor. The course will meet for 10 hours per semester at a time to be arranged. Due to the individualized instruction of this Applied Instruction, a course fee of $650 per semester will be billed in addition to standard tuition.
    Note: New course
  
  •  

    FAA 1374 - Individual Music Lessons Piano

    Credits: 0 or 1
    Individual Music Lessons are designed to give students the chance to create music in an experiential, individualized learning environment. Students will work in a one to one setting with the instructor. The course will meet for 10 hours per semester at a time to be arranged. Due to the individualized instruction of this Applied Instruction, a course fee of $650 per semester will be billed in addition to standard tuition.
    Note: New course
  
  •  

    FAA 1375 - Individual Music Lessons Brass

    Credits: 0 or 1
    Individual Music Lessons are designed to give students the chance to create music in an experiential, individualized learning environment. Students will work in a one to one setting with the instructor. The course will meet for 10 hours per semester at a time to be arranged. Due to the individualized instruction of this Applied Instruction, a course fee of $650 per semester will be billed in addition to standard tuition.
    Note: New course
  
  •  

    FAA 1510 - Acting I

    Credits: 4
    This is an introductory level acting class. The course explores the basic concepts of acting, characterization, improvisation, script analysis and rehearsal techniques through class exercises, written assignments, readings and preparation of monologues and scenes. This course seeks to impart an understanding of the primary physical, emotional, and intellectual skills needed to become an actor as well as the critical skills necessary to evaluate performance. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement.
    Fulfills: Humanities distribution requirement. AL and X in LS Core.
  
  •  

    FAA 1515 - Theatre Practicum: Rehearsal and Performance

    Credits: 2
    This course is a hands-on learning experience in theatre production and performance. Students will gain practical skills and essential knowledge of what it takes to mount a production for the stage by working in one of five production areas: scene shop, lighting, costume shop, props or public relations/management. Students may also elect to focus their practicum experience on the performance area by appearing as an actor in a mainstage production. Requires a minimum of 40 hours of work. Students may take the course two times only.
    Prerequisite(s): Theatre major or minor or permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    FAA 1520 - Voice for the Stage

    Credits: 4
    This course is designed to develop stronger speaking/performance skills for actors and others who desire increased range, power and expressivity of their voice. Explores the techniques and training principles of Rodenburg and Linklater. Physical exercises will be implemented seeking to free up the natural voice. Reading and writing assignments required. Performance projects will be presented working with the following texts: poetry, prose, Shakespeare, contemporary drama, commercial script, and voice-over narrative.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core.
  
  •  

    FAA 1550 - The Curtain Calls: An Introduction to Theatre for Everyone

    Credits: 4
    What distinguishes live theatre from other art and entertainment forms and why has theatre withstood the test of time? This introductory level survey course explores the nature of the theatrical experience and seeks to familiarize the student with a variety of theatricals styles. Through readings, lectures, demonstrations and attending live theatre, students will become familiar with the various roles involved in making theatre (playwright, actor, director, designers, critics, etc.) as well as the basics of the sociology of theatre and performance. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement.
    Fulfills: Humanities distribution requirement. AL and X in LS Core.
  
  •  

    FAA 1555 - Acting for Educators: Performance, Presence and Pedagogy

    Credits: 4
    This course explores the integral relationship between the actors presence onstage and the educators presence in the classroom. The course serves as an introduction to the art of acting and teaches the basic concepts of acting, improvisation, script analysis, and rehearsal techniques. Students will acquire an understanding of the connection between performance skills and teaching in the classroom as well as the use of theatre practices as a pedagogical methodology.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core.
  
  •  

    FAA 1600 - Inside Art: A Global Perspective

    Credits: 4
    m. Field trips are integral to the course where the art museums and galleries become the classroom. As a general introduction to the history of art, “Inside Art” encourages an understanding of purposes and techniques, and emphasizes the relationship of an art work’s form to its meaning. For every gallery or museum visit (approximately five) a 2-3 pp. paper will be required as a record of the student’s experience. The Addison Gallery of American Art in Andover, the Currier Museum of Art in Manchester (NH), the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, the DeCordova Art Museum and Sculpture Park in Lincoln, and the McCoy Gallery, The Rogers Center, are among the potential sites. “Inside Art” is designed for non-majors who are interested in a general introduction to world art (from prehistoric Europe to Egypt, China, ancient Greece and Rome, Oceania, Africa, modern Europe and the Americas) from an art historical perspective. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement.
    Fulfills: AL and X in LS Core.
  
  •  

    FAA 1610 - Art & Material Culture I: Prehistory to the Renaissance

    Credits: 4
    An examination of selected works of art and architecture and the historical and cultural contexts appropriate to them, from the birth of image-making to the high culture of the late Middle Ages.
    Fulfills: Humanities distribution requirement. AL or H in LS Core.
  
  •  

    FAA 1620 - Art & Material Culture II: The Renaissance to the Present

    Credits: 4
    Art History II is anchored in the culture and traditions of Western Europe and America. Beginning in Italy during the early modern period, this course provides for an understanding of: individual artists and their works, studied within their historical and art historical contexts; the demands placed upon art-marking by patrons and society; and the changing role of the artist’s place in society. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement.
    Fulfills: Humanities distribution requirement. AL or H in LS Core.
  
  •  

    FAA 1670 - American Art I

    Credits: 4
    The art of colonial America and the early Republic, from the 17th century to the 1870’s. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement.
    Fulfills: Humanities distribution requirement. AL in LS Core.
  
  •  

    FAA 1680 - American Art II

    Credits: 4
    American art from 1880 to the present. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement.
    Fulfills: Humanities distribution requirement. AL in LS Core.
  
  •  

    FAA 1710 - Foundations of Visual Arts

    Credits: 4
    An approach to an understanding of art through the consideration of both fine art and practical objects, perception and visual communication, style and media, critical analysis. Slide/lecture. Satisfies a Humanities distribution requirement.
    Fulfills: Humanities distribution requirement. AL in LS Core.
  
  •  

    FAA 2210 - Basic Drawing II

    Credits: 4
    A continuation of FAA1210, Basic Drawing I. Light and dark modeling and perspective drawing techniques are developed. Abstraction is emphasized in the latter part of the course.  Collage is explored. Individual drawing projects are developed.     
    Prerequisite(s): FAA 1210 , or permission of the instructor.
    Fulfills: Humanities distribution requirement. AL in LS Core.
  
  •  

    FAA 2220 - Cartooning and Illustration

    Credits: 4
    This class will explore the possibilities of drawing and cartooning as a medium for creative expression and thoughtful communication of ideas. Students will be exposed to art making techniques derived from objective design elements and principles. Students will have the opportunity to create cartoon characters based upon the study of facial and anatomical forms, and to develop imaginative contexts for bringing characters to life and to tell a story. It is recommended, but not required, that students have drawing experience prior to taking this class.
  
  •  

    FAA 2230 - 3-Dimensional Design

    Credits: 4
    This course explores the basic design elements of: space, surface, point, line, shape, form, color, texture, and pattern in the context of three dimensions. This is a hands-on studio experience with projects that consist of preliminary studies as well as “finished” works. Each project includes thumbnail sketches, rough examples, library research and a class critique. Each student will receive a project point evaluation sheet after the completion of a project.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
  
  •  

    FAA 2250 - Mixed Media Studio

    Credits: 4
    This course will explore how the definition of art has been altered or extended through the following Modernist and Postmodernist techniques: collage, assemblage, found art, earth art, conceptual art and art of the book. It offers creative exploration in both two-and three-dimensions, which mirrors such art movements as Cubism, Expressionism, and Surrealism.
    Prerequisite(s): One art studio course at the college level. (Examples: drawing, 2-dimensional design, painting). Special permission may be granted by the instructor to students who have taken a number of art courses in high school.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
  
  •  

    FAA 2260 - Art of the Portrait

    Credits: 4
    This elemental drawing class uses structured weekly projects based on the portrait. Goals will be to develop skills of observation, an understanding of anatomy, proportion, and how light reveals form. The course will also cover the historical aspects of the portrait, relating to composition, symbolism, and style. Teaching will involve weekly demonstrations, individual instruction and group critiques. Students will work with various media, including pencil, charcoal and conte crayon, using photographs and live models.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
 

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 -> 10