Jul 02, 2022  
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog

Course Descriptions


 

Visual and Performing Arts

  
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    MUS 1375 - Individual Music Lessons Brass

    Credits: 1
    Individual Music Lessons are designed to give students the chance to create music in an experiential, individualized learning environment. Students will work in a one to one setting with the instructor. The course will meet for 10 hours per semester at a time to be arranged. Due to the individualized instruction of this Applied Instruction, a course fee of $650 per semester will be billed in addition to standard tuition.
  
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    MUS 1376 - Individual Music Lessons Piano

    Credits: variable 0 - 1
    This course is designed to give vocal and instrumental students the chance to create music in an experiential, individualized learning environment. Repertory to be studied will be tailored to individual student needs and preferences. Students will also learn appropriate technique, note-reading, scales and arpeggios. Students may take up to 8 semesters of Applied Music Instruction for voice or any instrument.
  
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    MUS 1377 - Individual Music Lessons - Strings

    Credits: 0 - 1
    This course is designed to give vocal and instrumental students the chance to create music in an experiential, individualized learning environment. Repertory to be studied will be tailored to individual student needs and preferences. Students will also learn appropriate technique, note-reading, scales and arpeggios. Students may take up to 8 semesters of Applied Music Instruction for voice or any instrument. 
  
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    MUS 2301 - Music History I: Antiquity to the Baroque

    Credits: 4
    The first half of a two-semester sequence surveying the music of the western classical tradition. This course examines the creation and development of musical genres throughout the historical periods from classical antiquity in Greece and Rome to the culmination of the Baroque. Emphases on active listening, writing about music, and the study of genres within their social and historical contexts.
    Fulfills: AL or H in LS Core.
  
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    MUS 2302 - Music History II: Classical to the 21st Century

    Credits: 4
    The second half of a two-semester sequence surveying the music of the western classical tradition. This course examines the creation and development of musical genres throughout the historical periods from the Enlightenment through the present day. Emphases on active listening, writing about music, and the study of genres within their social historical contexts.
    Fulfills: AL or H in LS Core.
  
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    MUS 2360 - Elementary Music Theory: Understanding Musical Notation

    Credits: 4
    This course is structured to teach students the basic skills necessary in order to read, study and perform from musical notation. Musical elements including pitch, rhythm, the staff system, key and time signatures, intervals and chords, and modulation will be examined.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core.
  
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    MUS 2380 - The Architecture of Music: From Phrase to Opera

    Credits: 4 cr.
    This course is designed to teach students about formal structure in musical compositions. While emphasis will be placed on specific classical genres, including the sonata, symphony, and opera, students will be encouraged towards individual exploration of form in music of other styles and traditions as well, such as world music, jazz, and rock.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core.
  
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    MUS 3100 - Music and Spirituality

    Credits: 4
    This course uses musical activity as a lens to explore the multifarious ways in which music participants seek to connect with the sacred world. During the course of the semester, we will investigate a variety of compositions from many different cultures, geographical locations, and time periods that directly address the divine. Our central questions will include the following: How can music become a conduit for accessing the spiritual realm? Must specific conditions be in place to do so? Why are music and religion so closely connected in such a myriad of cultures?
    Fulfills: AL and X in LS Core
  
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    MUS 3171 - Music and Politics

    Credits: 4
    This course explores how music has been used as a means of expressing political will and as a political tool over history and around the world. We will study the use of protest music by those challenging political institutions as well as how political actors have treated music as a political tool. We will look at the political dynamics that gave rise to and found expression in particular genres of music and also consider questions of censorship and government control of music. This is an interdisciplinary course, and will approach the material through a blend of materials and approaches from disciplines including musicology, history, and political science.  
    Cross-Listed: POL 3171  
    Fulfills: D, AL or SOSC in LS Core
  
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    MUS 3310 - Music Production

    Credits: 4
    The purpose of this course is to gain a basic understanding of both computer hardware and software used in a musical environment, with the goal of creating a digitally integrated music research project. This course is designed to equip students with applied knowledge of how technology impacts and has impacted the musical world. Students will gain knowledge of how to record sound naturally occurring in the acoustic world, as well as create sound using digital instruments and software. This course will also cover the history and development of electronic music.
  
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    MUS 3320 - Songwriting

    Credits: 4
    This course will provide students with a solid background in the art and craft of songwriting. Throughout the semester, students will study the key features of songwriting; lyrics, rhythm, melody, harmony, and song structure. Students will accomplish this by studying pre-existing songs found in the American, Popular Music tradition and crafting these key elements of songwriting through a variety of exercises and writing challenges.  
  
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    MUS 3330 - Music Composition

    Credits: 4
    The purpose of this course is to develop skills in creative thinking and expression through music composition. Students will study, replicate, and recreate various forms of music composition and will be towards devlopment of their own compositional style through composing for various combinations of instruments, voices, and electronic sounds. Students will also learn how to use notation software and digital audio workstations in order to present their music compositions for either live performance or recorded works. 
  
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    MUS 3360 - Principles of Composition

    Credits: 4
    A course designed to teach the student the basic techniques of writing music - including aspects of structure, instrumental usage, handling of different textures and compositional principles. Intensive creative work, often leading to readings of this music and a final work in performance will lead the student to both technical and musical self- expression.
    Prerequisite(s): MUS 2360  or permission of the instructor.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core.
  
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    MUS 4910 - Music Internship

    Credits: 2 - 4 credits


    On or off-campus internship, which involves the student in hands-on-experience in the arts. Under the supervision of a visual and performing arts faculty member, culminating in a field-related project (comprehensive report, mid-term and final portfolio, performance, exhibit, etc.) Open to juniors and seniors with consent of their visual and performing arts faculty advisor.

     
    Fulfills: AL and X in LS Core

  
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    MUS 4920 - Music Internship II

    Credits: 4
    On or off-campus internship, which involves the student in hands-on-experience in the arts. Under the supervision of a visual and performing arts faculty member, culminating in a field-related project (comprehensive report, mid-term and final portfolio, performance, exhibit, etc.) Open to juniors and seniors with consent of their visual and performing arts faculty advisor
    Fulfills: Al and X in LS Core
    Note: Open to Music majors only
  
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    MUS 4930 - Special Topics-Music

    Credits: 2 - 8 credits
    This course will provide students with a solid background in the art and craft of songwriting. Throughout the semester, students will study the key features of songwriting: lyrics, rhythm, melody, harmony, and song structure. Students will accomplish this by studying pre-existing songs found in the American, Popular Music tradition and crafting these key elements of songwriting through a variety of exercises and writing challenges.
  
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    MUS 4960 - Senior Seminar - Music

    Credits: 4
  
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    THR 1510 - Acting I

    Credits: 4
    This is an introductory level acting class. The course explores the basic concepts of acting, characterization, improvisation, script analysis and rehearsal techniques through class exercises, written assignments, readings and preparation of monologues and scenes. This course seeks to impart an understanding of the primary physical, emotional, and intellectual skills needed to become an actor as well as the critical skills necessary to evaluate performance. 
    Fulfills: AL and X in LS Core.
  
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    THR 1515 - Theatre Practicum: Rehearsal and Performance

    Credits: 2
    This course is a hands-on learning experience in theatre production and performance. Students will gain practical skills and essential knowledge of what it takes to mount a production for the stage by working in one of five production areas: scene shop, lighting, costume shop, props or public relations/management. Students may also elect to focus their practicum experience on the performance area by appearing as an actor in a mainstage production. Requires a minimum of 40 hours of work. Students may take the course two times only.
    Prerequisite(s): Theatre major or minor or permission of instructor.
  
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    THR 1520 - Voice for the Stage

    Credits: 4
    This course is designed to develop stronger speaking/performance skills for actors and others who desire increased range, power and expressivity of their voice. Explores the techniques and training principles of Rodenburg and Linklater. Physical exercises will be implemented seeking to free up the natural voice. Reading and writing assignments required. Performance projects will be presented working with the following texts: poetry, prose, Shakespeare, contemporary drama, commercial script, and voice-over narrative.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core.
  
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    THR 1550 - The Curtain Calls: An Introduction to Theatre for Everyone

    Credits: 4
    What distinguishes live theatre from other art and entertainment forms and why has theatre withstood the test of time? This introductory level survey course explores the nature of the theatrical experience and seeks to familiarize the student with a variety of theatricals styles. Through readings, lectures, demonstrations and attending live theatre, students will become familiar with the various roles involved in making theatre (playwright, actor, director, designers, critics, etc.) as well as the basics of the sociology of theatre and performance. 
    Fulfills: AL and X in LS Core.
  
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    THR 1555 - Acting for Educators: Performance, Presence and Pedagogy

    Credits: 4


    In this course students will acquire an understanding of the connection between performance skills and teaching in the classroom, as well as the use of theatre techniques as pedagogical methodologies. It explores the integral relationship between the actor’s presence onstage and the educator’s presence in the classroom. Theater activities such as acting, playmaking, and improvisation will be used to reinforce more traditional teaching pedagogies, aiding teachers in meeting state mandated learning outcomes. 

     
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core.

  
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    THR 2500 - Women in Theatre

    Credits: 4
    The study of women in theatre - primarily as subjects and playwrights but also as actors, designers, and directors. Course examines how gender is constructed and influenced through the work of women artists. Explores the role(s) of women in the theatre by addressing questions of intersectionality. Research papers, creative projects and attendance at one outside performance required.
    Fulfills: AL and D in LS Core
  
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    THR 2505 - The Politics of Performance: Theatre, Government, and Social Change

    Credits: 4
    Theatre has consistently made a significant impact on the socio-political structures in which it is performed. From the politics of the ancient world to the present day, theatre artists have used their art form to challenge the status quo, to expose unjust systems of oppression, to effect change in the social network. Likewise, government uses elements of theatre to promote particular agendas and suppress individuals and social groups who challenge the dominant groups claims to political power. Drawing on the long and varied history of theatre, this course will explore the political nature of theatre and the relationship between theatre arts, political ideologies, institutional structures, and efforts at social change between 1900 and the present day.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
  
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    THR 2510 - Acting II

    Credits: 4
    A second level acting class for those students who have completed Acting I (THR 1510 ). This class is conducted as an intensive performance workshop where the focus is on refining acting skills and approaching classical and contemporary texts. Students will expand knowledge of acting theory through an introduction to the work of Michael Chekhov. Assignments include reading, written work, script analysis and preparation of monologues and scenes.
    Prerequisite(s): THR 1510  or permission of the instructor.
    Fulfills: AL and X in LS Core.
  
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    THR 2520 - Theatre History Part One: Origins to Renaissance

    Credits: 4
    The first half of a two semester sequence exploring Western and Non-Western theatre history. Examination of dramatic literature and theatrical practice from the origins of theatre to the English Renaissance. Focus is on three basic areas of inquiry: the physical theatre, the social theatre, and the performing theatre. Research papers and creative projects required.
    Fulfills: AL or H in LS Core.
  
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    THR 2530 - Theatre History Part Two: Restoration to the Present

    Credits: 4
    The second half of a two semester sequence exploring Western and Non-Western theatre history. This course examines dramatic literature and theatrical practice from the English Restoration to the contemporary theatre. Explores the physical, social, cultural, and historical evidence that leads us to hypotheses and conclusions as theatre historians. Includes Introduction to theatre historiography. Research papers and creative projects required.
    Fulfills: AL or H in LS Core.
  
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    THR 2540 - Introduction to Playwriting

    Credits: 4
    Class involves intensive workshop style format devoted to the activity of writing for the stage. Examination of terminology, theory, principles, and methods of playwriting. Explores sources for developing dramatic works as well as strategies for critiquing new work. Class encourages creativity and discipline around the practice of playwriting. Course culminates in the writing and stage readings of students generated one-act plays.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core.
  
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    THR 2550 - American Musical Theater

    Credits: 4


    An examination of the Broadway musical, exploring the history, music, and literature of this uniquely American art form. Students will study the structure, terminology, practitioners, organization and history of the American musical from 1866 through the present. Research papers and creative projects required.

     
    Fulfills: AL and W in LS Core

  
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    THR 2560 - London Theatre

    Credits: 4
    Students will discover, through in-class study and travel to London, what makes London one of the world’s most important theatre cities. Beginning with Shakespeare and continuing to the present day, students will study significant theatrical figures, the cultural phenomena that shaped theatrical traditions, and the influence held by other European theatres and practitioners upon the London stage. Students will travel to London over Spring Break to witness live theatre, participate in workshops, meet practitioners, and gain greater appreciation for the role London holds as a global theatrical capital.
    Fulfills: AL and X in LS Core.
    Note: Additional fees for travel apply.
  
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    THR 2570 - Technical Production for the Theatre

    Credits: 4


    This project-based class introduces students to the skills and techniques used in technical theatre. Students will learn how to safely and effectively use equipment commonly found in the production of lighting, sound,scenery, and costume construction. Students will gain hands-on experience through classroom work, homework assignments, student designed projects, and the construction of Rogers Center main-stage productions.     

     

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    Prerequisite(s): Theater Arts major or minor or permission of the instructor.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
    Note: Added prerequisite.

  
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    THR 2580 - Design for the Theatre

    Credits: 4


    This course explores the world of theatrical design including scenery, lighting, and costumes. Students will be exposed to plays which represent a variety of design styles and periods, and learn how to read and analyze them from a designer’s perspective. Students will learn how to collaborate with the production team and effectively communicate their design ideas through drafting, rendering and model-making.

     
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core

  
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    THR 2585 - Improvisation

    Credits: 4
    This course introduces the history, theories, principles, and practices of theatrical improvisation, including exercises, games, and situational scenes designed to hone performance skills. The course introduces both short and long form Improvisation.
    Prerequisite(s): Theatre major or minor or permission of the instructor.
  
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    THR 2586 - Script Analysis

    Credits: 4
    Using formalist analysis as a starting point, this course examines the process of analyzing theatrical texts, with specific consideration for the needs of the actor, the director, and the theatrical designer in a theoretically practical situation. Through careful study of play texts from as early as 430 BC up to the present, students will utilize traditional classifications to analyze individual elements of a text in order to better understand their meaning and purpose in relation to the artistic whole and/or how the individual work relate to the body of work of a particular playwright.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
  
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    THR 3510 - Directing I

    Credits: 4
    An introduction to the three major areas of directing: script analysis, directing fundamentals, and practice. Students will explore through readings, written and practical exercises the goals and processes of directing for the theatre. Course culminates in a public-performance of student directed ten minute plays.
    Prerequisite(s): THR 1510  or permission of the instructor.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
  
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    THR 3520 - Acting III: Special Topics in Acting

    Credits: 4
    This is an upper level acting class that explores special topics in acting. Specific topics vary from year to year with emphasis on advanced techniques such as: period/style, commedia dell’larte, physical theatre, puppetry, improvisation, on-camera techniques and auditioning.
    Prerequisite(s): THR 1510  or permission of instructor.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
  
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    THR 3550 - Theatre Arts Capstone Seminar

    Credits: 4
    This capstone course, taken in the fall of the student’s junior year, provides students with opportunities to investigate their areas of interest in theatre in depth and create an actionable plan for their performance pieces, designs, stage management documents, academic papers, and dramaturgy, that will be manifested during their senior year. The class will assist the students in preparing the archival evidence necessary for professional portfolios to represent themselves in the workplace. Students will also develop a career plan in order to map out a path for employment, graduate school, or further training upon completion of their degree. The capstone course seeks to instill the process of inquiry, research, and meaningful self-reflection into a practical project that explores the art of theatre. 
     
  
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    THR 3560 - Bioethical Dramas

    Credits: 4


    Bioethical Dramas focuses on ethical issues in medicine and their portrayal in popular culture. The central questions explored in this class are: 1. How does the practice of modern medicine impact our lives? and 2. What do portrayals of medical practice in popular culture reveal to us about how we view ourselves and others? Students will gain knowledge of current bioethical issues through the reading of short philosophical texts, case studies, journalistic pieces, experiential theater activities, and the critical analysis of dramatic works in script and film. Readings and other class preparation will facilitate students’ ability to understand and evaluate the impact of the history and current state of medicine and biomedical research on the human condition. 

    Using theater activities such as improvisation, script writing and character/scene development this course provides a link between knowing “about bioethical issues and their portrayal in current media, and using this knowledge to interrogate these problems, empathize with affected individuals and populations, and envision ethically justifiable resolutions. Issues explored in class may include: withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment, physician assisted suicide, reproductive decision-making, the impact of genetic testing on patients, families and society, fair allocation of scarce resources, structural racism and sexism in medicine and medical research, and the stigmatization of overweight, mentally ill and other patients. 

     
    Prerequisite(s): Any 1000-level PHL course.
    Cross-Listed: PHL3560

  
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    THR 4910 - Theatre Internship

    Credits: 2 - 4 credits


    On or off-campus internship, which involves the student in hands-on-experience in the arts. Under the supervision of a visual and performing arts faculty member, culminating in a field-related project (comprehensive report, mid-term and final portfolio, performance, exhibit, etc.) Open to juniors and seniors with consent of their visual and performing arts faculty advisor.

     
    Fulfills: AL and X in LS Core

  
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    THR 4920 - Theatre Internship II

    Credits: 4


    On or off-campus internship, which involves the student in hands-on-experience in the arts. Under the supervision of a visual and performing arts faculty member, culminating in a field-related project (comprehensive report, mid-term and final portfolio, performance, exhibit, etc.) Open to juniors and seniors with consent of their visual and performing arts faculty advisor.

     
    Fulfills: Al and X in LS Core
    Note: Open to Theatre majors only

  
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    THR 4930 - Special Topics-Theatre

    Credits: 2 - 8 credits
    This course is designed to explore a selected topic in the visual and performing arts. Course content could be lectures, readings, research, experiential learning, oral presentation, and group work. The specific topic varies each time the course is offered and is tailored to the interest of the Department.
  
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    VPA 1110 - Introduction to Visual and Performing Arts

    Credits: 4
    This course is designed to introduce students to the history, breadth, and contemporary relevance of the visual and performing arts. Students will gain a clearer perspective of what visual and performing arts are/can be, more fully understand the interconnectivity of multiple mediums and artistic movements, and see how the visual and performing arts can influence and inform other academic areas of study not normally associated with the fine and applied arts. The course content, projects, and structure of will be based on the three fundamental pillas of an arts education: experience, create, and reflect.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
  
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    VPA 1220 - 9/11 in Words and Images

    Credits: 4
    This course looks at the creative response to 9/11 in art and literature during the decade following the September 11th, 2001 terror attacks. 9/11 elicited a wide array of passionate and conflicting responses across politics, the media, and the arts. Discourse centered on the problem of making sense of such a shocking turn in current events. The course explores creative processes in which the response to 9/11 proved to be an important part of how the West, particularly the United States, attempted to develop an understanding of what took place on 9/11. Analysis and exploration in the visual arts, the literary essay, and the graphic novel will be utilized throughout the semester.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
  
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    VPA 2590 - Arts Management

    Credits: 4
    How do the arts intersect with the world of business? This course introduces students to the challenging and exciting sector of arts management within the context of their own artistic practice, as well as their prospective careers. Students explore the management of a variety of disciplines including music, theatre, visual arts, design, and the interdisciplinarity of the arts. Content covered includes an overview of arts management in the United States, the fundamentals of how to treat your arts or design practice as a business, how to operate as an independent contractor/artist entrepreneur, how to start a small business in the arts, and survey the variety of careers and opportunities available within arts management. This course consists of lectures, readings, research, guest visits by local professionals in arts management, self/team assignments, student presentations, discussion, and working production time.
    Fulfills: AL in LS Core
  
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    VPA 3960 - Methodologies of Scholarship in the Visual and Performing Arts

    Credits: 4
    This course examines how the disciplines of Studio Art, Art History, and Design are interrelated and connect with other disciplines. Theoretical and practical models of scholarship are utilized with focused intention on developing a capstone project. Issues explored include aesthetics, formalism, class, gender and race constructions, literary criticism, postmodern theory, as well as ritual and performance theory. Course material is presented in a variety of ways, all designed to promote thoughtful discussion. This is a research and writing intensive course, which prepares visual and performing arts majors to produce their senior thesis and better understand graduate level work. This course is required for all Art and Art History and Graphic Design majors, though it is open to non-majors who have already had at least one semester of art, music or theatre history. Students will be expected to work outside of class to finish projects and assignments.
    Prerequisite(s): DES 3880  , or permission of the instructor.
    Fulfills: W in LS Core
  
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    VPA 4930 - Special Topics-VPA

    Credits: 2 - 8 credits
    This course is designed to explore a selected topic in the visual and performing arts. Course content could be lectures, readings, research, experiential learning, oral presentation, and group work. The specific topic varies each time the course is offered and is tailored to the interest of the Department.

Finance

  
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    FIN 2500 - Managerial Finance

    Credits: 4
    Formerly: BUS2215
    This course introduces the basics of a standard finance course. The goal is to provide a comfortable level of understanding of corporate finance and financial markets and securities for all business majors. The course will develop the financial skills and knowledge that will help them interact with the other functions of the firm to make good managerial decisions. The main topics included in the course are outlined under five main areas: (1) financial markets and institutions in a global environment; (2) financial ratios, budgeting, a firm’s pro forma financial statements, and cash flows determining firm value; (3) time value of money tools and concepts (compounding, discounting, annuities, and perpetuities); (4) relationship between risk and return; and (5) the basics of bond & stock valuation.
    Prerequisite(s): ACC 2203 , MTH 1003  or equivalent (MTH 1002  or MTH 1016  or MTH 1115 , or MTH 1217 ), and ECO 1203   
  
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    FIN 3310 - Personal Financial Planning

    Credits: 4
    This course is designed for students interested in learning how to manage their own financial affairs and make decisions that will improve their overall financial well-being. The course provides students with the knowledge, skills, and competence necessary to make wise financial decisions regarding cash and credit management, home buying, retirement planning, insurance, and tax and education planning. Students will have a solid understanding of the personal financial planning process and the use of quantitative and qualitative tools to measure financial health, manage liquidity, estimate insurance and retirement needs, and evaluate investment opportunites. Students will also learn insights from the consumer behavior and behavioral finance fields that will help guide their own financial planning processes.
  
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    FIN 3315 - Corporate Finance

    Credits: 4
    Formerly: Financial Analysis
    This is the foundation finance course that introduces and provides proficiency with the principles of financial management. The method of instruction focuses on lectures, excel modelling, problem solving and case analysis. The course covers resource planning and analysis, financial reporting, and valuation and net present value concepts used for valuing securities, projects, and companies. Topics include risk and return, capital budgeting, financial statement analysis, working capital management, and financial forecasting.
    Prerequisite(s): MGT 2120  and  FIN 2500 .
  
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    FIN 3325 - Investments

    Credits: 4
    This course introduces portfolio theory and examines risk-return tradeoffs and portfolio diversification. Topics include investment environment, financial systems, institutions, and markets, how securities are traded, security analysis, and equity, fixed income, and derivative valuation. In addition, this course discusses management of bond portfolios. This course includes a security analysis and valuation project.  Given the nature of modern investment analysis, the course is statistically, and somewhat computer, intensive.
    Prerequisite(s): MGT 2120  and FIN 2500   
  
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    FIN 3400 - International Financial Management

    Credits: 4
    Formerly: FIN4406
    This course covers the environment of multinational financial management, international financial markets with emphasis on the foreign exchange market, international flow of funds, relationships between exchange rates and economic variables, as well as hedging techniques and international arbitrage. This course also examines international capital budgeting, short-term financing and investment, and foreign direct investment.
    Prerequisite(s): FIN 2500 .
  
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    FIN 3500 - Fieldwork in Financial Coaching

    Credits: 4


    Formerly:  

     
    This course is designed to provide students from all majors with the knowledge, skills, and practical experience necessary to become effective financial coaches. Students intern for a semester at the Financial Capability Center and upon successfully completing the academic, management, and service components of the course, earn a certificate in financial coaching. To be trained as coaches, students participate in faculty-led workshops where they learn personal finance, coaching, and cultural competences. After completing the training, students are matched with clients from our local non-profit partners. Student coaches offer financial capability workshops that provide clients with basic knowledge and skills, and one-on-one coaching sessions that help clients plan a path for realizing their own goals. Student coaches are supported by faculty, staff, counselors from local partners, translators and industry expert volunteers. In addition to providing direct services to clients and peers, team of students support the Center with general management, data management, research, grant writing, outreach and/or marketing functions. Students dedicate between 10-15 hours per week to coaching and center support activities.
     
    Prerequisite(s): Faculty consent required 

  
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    FIN 4010 - Business Enterprise Internship

    Credits: 4
    Formerly: BUS4850
    Paid and unpaid internships are an opportunity for students to gain experience in actual work settings where they can apply their classroom and other prior learning. Students work with their internship supervisor and their professor to gain insights into the daily routines and the overall process, activities, and content of a particular setting or industry. Internships may be in for-profit, not-for-profit or public sector organizations depending on the interests of the student. While there is no specific GPA requirement for the course, it is generally recommended that you have a minimum GPA of 2.70.  This course does not satisfy a Corporate Finance and Investment or Financial Planning Concentration elective or a Finance minor elective or a Business Administration minor elective.  
    Prerequisite(s): Must submit application to be reviewed for approval prior to registration. Must be declared as a Corporate Finance and Investment or Financial Planning Concentration.
    Fulfills: X in LS Core
  
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    FIN 4020 - Second Business Internship

    Credits: 4


    The second business internship is available to students who have completed their first internship (ACC4010, FIN4010, MGT4010, or MKT4010), the Sport Management Practicum (SPM4000), the Accounting Co-Op (ACC4000), or the Hospitality Management Practicum (HSP40000) and who would like to gain credit for another internship experience. Paid and unpaid internships are an opportunity for students to gain experience in actual work settings where they can apply their classroom and other prior learning. Students will work with their internship supervisor and their professor to gain insights into the daily routines and the overall process, activities, and content of a particular setting or industry that is different from their first internship experience. Internships may be in for-profit, not-for-profit or public sector organizations depending on the interests of the student. This course does not satisfy a Corporate Finance and Investments or Financial Planning concentration elective or a Finance minor elective or a Business Administration minor elective.

     
    Prerequisite(s): FIN 4010  . Must submit application to be reviewed for approval prior to registration. Must be declare as a Corporate Finance and Investment or Financial Planning Concentration

  
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    FIN 4315 - Financial Markets and Institutions

    Credits: 4
    This course focuses on the different types of financial institutions and the regulatory and competitive environment in which they exist. Emphasis is placed on managerial aspects of commercial banking and the various agencies and regulations that govern banks. In this course, students will experience real-life management decision-making by running a simulated mid-size bank. Students will make strategic planning, asset/liability management, forecasting and planning, and pricing services decisions throughout the semester.
    Prerequisite(s): FIN 3315  
  
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    FIN 4320 - Financial Valuation

    Credits: 4
    This course focuses on how financial assets and firms are valued in financial markets. The course serves as background for other finance elective courses and builds skills in key valuation principles such as firm valuation. Students emphasize the economic underpinning and application of valuation techniques. The goal of this course is to help the student’s ability to use financial statement information and related disclosures to evaluate the underlying economics of a corporation. Course participants examine the company’s past and current performance, and its competitive environment by collecting, analyzing, and interpreting data from the firm’s using financial database. Students develop a financial model of the firm, in the form of pro forma financial statements, in order to forecast the firms’ future performance. These projections in turn become the inputs to the valuation techniques, which include discounted cash flow models, residual income (or abnormal earnings) models, and market multiple (or relative valuation) methods. The course emphasizes the discounted cash flow method of valuation and we use this approach to estimate the intrinsic value of the firm.
    Prerequisite(s): FIN 3315  
  
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    FIN 4431 - Applied Corporate Finance

    Credits: 4
    This is an advanced corporate finance course that assumes proficiency with the principles of financial management. Topics covered include enterprise valuation, Initial Public Offers, mergers and acquisitions and corporate governance. The method of instruction focuses on case analysis; the course is based on class discussion, oral presentations, written analysis and computer modeling.
    Prerequisite(s): FIN 3315 .
  
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    FIN 4433 - Portfolio Analysis

    Credits: 4
    This is an advanced investments course that assumes proficiency with the principles of portfolio management, market efficiency, and asset pricing. The course covers asset classes, equity, fixed income, derivatives, and financial markets. The method of delivery focuses on case studies and financial modeling practice.

     
    Prerequisite(s): FIN 3325  
  
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    FIN 4435 - Financial Planning

    Credits: 4
    This course is designed for students interested in pursuing careers in the financial planning profession and for those wishing to learn how to manage their own financial affairs and make wise financial decisions. The course provides students with the knowledge, skills and competence necessary to make and advise on individual financial planning decisions such as risk management and insurance, retirement, tax, education, and large purchase planning. Students will have a solid understanding of the personal financial planning process and the use of quantitative and qualitative tools to measure financial well-being, manage liquidity, debt, & credit, and estimate insurance and retirement needs. Students will also learn communication and counseling strategies and techniques found to be effective in personal and professional interactions. Finally, students will learn insights from the consumer behavior and behavioral finance fields that will help guide their clients, and their own, financial planning processes.
    Prerequisite(s): FIN 2500   
  
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    FIN 4436 - Income Tax and Estate Planning

    Credits: 4
    Formerly: Financial Planning II
    This course has been designed for students that are considering a career in Financial Planning.  The primary areas of focus for this course include: (1) Professional Conduct for those engaged in financial planning; (2) Tax Planning; (3) Business Financial Planning; and (4) Estate Planning. Use of the text will be supplemented with case studies that will give students the chance to apply course concepts to realistic fact patterns.  The course will conclude with a comprehensive case where students will create a financial plan that will address multiple financial objectives and choices. 
    Prerequisite(s): FIN 3325  and FIN 4435  
  
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    FIN 4470 - Student Managed Fund

    Credits: 4


    This course offers practical experience in security analysis, research and portfolio management by managing a real money portfolio.  The major objective of this course is to obtain a working knowledge of the fundamentals of portfolio management utilizing Bloomberg, Morningstar and S&P Capital IQ.  Materials and lectures to pass the Securities Industry Essential (SIE) exam.  Faculty consent required.

     

  
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    FIN 4800 - Directed Study in Finance

    Credits: 4
    An independent study course for students under the direction of a faculty member. Approval must be obtained from the department chair and the faculty member involved. This cannot be used to replace a required finance elective unless department approval is received. 
    Prerequisite(s): Faculty consent
  
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    FIN 4900 - Special Topics in Finance

    Credits: 4
    This course is designed to explore contemporary issues in Finance. The specific topic varies each time the course is taught. Descriptions are available in the Lucey Center for Business Advising. 
    Prerequisite(s): FIN 2500  

French

  
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    FRE 1010 - Beginner’s French I

    Credits: 4
    Formerly: FRE1110 - Introductory French I
    This course is offered for absolute beginners only.  This course is not open to heritage speakers or students with any prior study of French.  Oral-aural proficiency is acquired through speaking and role playing in class plus audio and visual practice outside of class, including internet drills from the Super Site that accompanies the book.  Students learn basic strategies for reading and writing in the language.  No French classes on High School Transcript.  Fulfills FL in LS Core. Three hours a week plus films and other cultural activities outside the classroom
    Fulfills: FL in LS Core
  
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    FRE 1020 - Beginner’s French II

    Credits: 4
    Formerly: FRE1120 - Introductory French II
    This course is offered for students with little or no background in French.  This course is not open to heritage speakers.  Oral-aural proficiency is acquired through speaking and role playing in class plus audio and visual practice outside of class, including internet drills from the Super Site that accompanies the book.  Students learn basic strategies for reading and writing in the language. Fulfills FL in LS Core.  Three hours a week plus films and other cultural activities outside the classroom.
    Prerequisite(s): Placed at this level by Placement Test or FRE 1010  or FRE 1110   or permission of the instructor. 
    Fulfills: FL in LS Core
  
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    FRE 1030 - Intermediate French I

    Credits: 4
    Formerly: FRE2010
    An intermediate level course with an emphasis on the study of grammar. Readings will consist of short texts from French and Francophone culture, literature, and civilization, along with articles of contemporary relevance.
    Prerequisite(s): Placed at this level by Placement Test or FRE 1020  or FRE 1120  or equivalent or permission of the instructor.
    Fulfills: FL in LS Core.
  
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    FRE 1040 - Intermediate French II

    Credits: 4
    Formerly: FRE2020
    A continuation of the intermediate course with an emphasis on the study of grammar. Readings will consist of short texts from French and Francophone literature and civilization, along with articles of contemporary relevance.
    Prerequisite(s): Placed at this level by Placement Test or FRE 1030  or equivalent or permission of the instructor.
    Fulfills: FL in LS Core.
  
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    FRE 1400 - Francophone Film

    Credits: 4
    Formerly: FRE3030 Cinema of the French Speaking World
    This course is offered for students who wish to study French and Francophone culture and civilization through film. Taught in English.
    Fulfills: AL in the LS Core.
  
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    FRE 1510 - Composition & Culture

    Credits: 4
    Formerly: FRE3010
    An advanced study of the most important grammatical structure of French, and practice of these structures in the context of the skill areas of listening, speaking, reading, writing, and cultural competence. Students will also watch short films and will answer questions on the cultural aspects of the films.
    Prerequisite(s): Placed at this level by Placement Test or FRE 1040  or equivalent or consent of the instructor.
    Fulfills: FL in LS Core.
    Note: This course may be offered as writing intesive.
  
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    FRE 1520 - Conversation and Culture

    Credits: 4
    Formerly: FRE3020
    This course is focused on the development of students’ confidence in their command of French, and their engagement with a variety of materials drawn from the internet or contemporary media. Through these materials and their own research, students will develop a personal connection to a French-speaking country. Class work will focus around larger topics: society, history, politics, food, music, literature, film, and culture.
    Prerequisite(s): Placed at this level by Placement Test or FRE 1040  or equivalent or consent of the instructor.
    Fulfills: FL in LS Core.
  
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    FRE 2060 - Actualités du monde francophone

    Credits: 4
    Formerly: FRE3050
    This course covers main events in today’s French-speaking world. Students will learn about contemporary French society, its geography, education system, political events, religion and culture. Students will also watch short documentaries in order to know contemporary issues and interests of France and French speaking nations. Appropriate background readings, lectures, and videotaped interviews in French will integrate up-to-the-minute readings with the broad historical, social and cultural backgrounds of the topics in question.
    Prerequisite(s): Placed at this level by Placement Test or FRE 1040  or equivalent or consent of the instructor. Recommended as a cultural course for international business students.
    Fulfills: FL in LS Core.
  
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    FRE 2200 - French Culture through Film

    Credits: 4
    Formerly: FRE3040 Five Centuries of French Civilization in Films
    This course is offered for students who wish to continue to develop their advanced language skills. There will be a study of French language and culture through films. There will be a selection of five films, each representing a century of French civilization and culture from the 17th century to the present. Students will be reminded of all the important events in history, literature, culture, and art; then, they will discuss how the films illustrate these events. Emphasis will be on building vocabulary, improving conversational and written skills, comprehension, and literary analysis.
    Fulfills: Fulfills D, AL and FL in LS Core.
    Note: Course may be offered as writing intensive.
  
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    FRE 2300 - Survey of French Literature I

    Credits: 4
    Formerly: FRE3110
    A chronological survey of French Literature. The first semester covers French literature from the Middle Ages to the 18th century. The second semester covers French literature from the 19th century to the present. An overview of the main currents of French literature through a reading of representative texts of each period will provide a general knowledge of the literary history of France. Oral and written reports. Either semester may be taken independently.
    Prerequisite(s): FRE 1510  or FRE 1520  or equivalent or consent of the instructor.
    Fulfills: Fulfill FL or AL in LS Core.
  
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    FRE 2350 - Survey of French Literature II

    Credits: 4
    Formerly: FRE3120
    A chronological survey of French Literature. The first semester covers French literature from the Middle Ages to the 18th century. The second semester covers French literature from the 19th century to the present. An overview of the main currents of French literature through a reading of representative texts of each period will provide a general knowledge of the literary history of France. Oral and written reports. Either semester may be taken independently.
  
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    FRE 2400 - Civilization: A Cultural History of France and the Francophone World

    Credits: 4
    Formerly: FRE3510 France and Its Civilization I
    A history of French civilization from its beginning to the present. The course will deal with the geography and history of France; the people, their manners and customs, their political, social and economic life; and their culture as reflected in the arts, sciences, philosophy, literature, music and education.
    Prerequisite(s): FRE 1510  or FRE 1520  or equivalent or consent of the instructor. Either semester may be taken independently.
    Fulfills: Fulfills FL and H in LS Core.
  
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    FRE 3000 - Studies in Francophone Literature I

    Credits: 4
    Formerly: FRE3130 Studies in Modern French and Francophone Literature I
    A study of major themes or genres in 20th century French or Francophone literature through a reading of representative texts in the original language. Texts and topics may vary from year to year.
    Prerequisite(s): FRE 1510  or FRE 1520  or equivalent or consent of the instructor. Either semester may be taken independently.
    Fulfills: Fulfill AL or FL in LS Core.
  
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    FRE 4900 - Directed Independent Study

    Credits: 4
    Intensive program of reading/writing under the direction of a full time member of the department. Provides exceptionally qualified WLCS seniors and second-semester juniors with an opportunity to work in depth on a focused topic not covered by the usual departmental course offerings. Requires a formal detailed proposal approved by the faculty members and the department chair.
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of at least one language course at the 3000 level, at least three additional courses in the major, a minimum GPA of 3.0 in the major, or permission of the instructor, in addition to the approval of the chair and consent of the members of the department under whose supervision the Directed Study will be conducted.

First Year Experience

  
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    FYE 1000 - First Year Experience

    Credits: 1
    College is a time for self-exploration, active engagement and understanding of the world. The purpose of the FYE course is to facilitate a positive transitional experience and establish a culture of self-advocacy. Through active engagement and reflective decision making, students will develop a foundation for academic, professional, social and personal success. Class will meet weekly for 75 minutes until the week prior to Thanksgiving. Classes will be co-taught by faculty/staff instructors and upper-class student mentors.
  
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    FYE 1050 - First Year Experience - Exploration

    Credits: 1
    College is a time for self-exploration, active engagement and understanding of the world.  The purpose of this course is to facilitate a positive transitional experience and establish a culture of self-advocacy.  Through active engagement and reflective decision making students will develop a foundation for academic, professional, social and personal success.  In addition to the traditional FYE curriculum, this course will introduce a variety of academic topics and their integral role in our current society.  This course will allow first-year students to dive deeply into an active and hands-on learning experience early in their academic career to get them excited about college-level learning.  The approach will also serve as an engaging preview for the types of immersive, learning-by doing opportunities that typically don’t come about until students reach their junior or senior years.  Thus, giving every student an experiential learning experience in their first semester.  

General Engineering

  
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    GEN 1001 - Introduction to Engineering

    Credits: 4
    This course provides freshman engineering students with the communication skills needed in college and throughout their careers, and introduces them to the profession of engineering. Computer skills, report generation, public speaking, leadership and teamwork skills, and computer-aided drawing are covered. Design is emphasized throughout.
  
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    GEN 1177 - Renewable Energy and the Environment

    Credits: 4
    This course combines both theory and nuts and bolts experience with electricity, energy production, and renewable energy topics. Students first learn the very basics of electricity - voltage, current, Ohm’s law. Power and the generation of power will be covered. The amount of coal needed to generate electricity to carry out various everyday tasks is explored. Renewable energy and energy efficiency are introduced. The cost of power is discussed. Real world applications are incorporated - student homes become “lab areas” where energy use of appliances is evaluated, along with actual analysis of electric bills. As the course progresses, issues pertaining to the impact of fossil fuel dependence on the environment are explored.
    Fulfills: STEM in LS Core.
    Note: Credit cannot be awarded for both EEN 1065  and GEN 1177.
  
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    GEN 2010 - Mechanics I

    Credits: 4
    Study of force systems in two and three dimensions. Equilibrium analysis of rigid bodies and simple structures, shear and moment diagrams, centroids, moments of inertia, friction. Introduction to concepts of dynamics, rectilinear translation, work, energy, impulse and momentum.
     
    Corequisite(s): PHY 2211 .
  
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    GEN 2012 - Mechanics of Materials

    Credits: 4


    Formerly:  

     
    Study of the fundamental mechanics of how materials behave when subjected to loadings, and how and why materials fail. Fundamental concepts of stress and strain, and the relationships between them. Effects of axial, shear, bending, and torsional loadings on the response of load-carrying members (such as beams, columns, shafts, tubes, and pressure vessels), and methods to determine the stress, stiffness, stability, and external deformations of these systems. Students will conduct laboratory tests for evaluating the engineering behavior of materials, and will analyze, evaluate, and communicate experimental results.

     
    Prerequisite(s): GEN 2010 , MTH 1218 .

  
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    GEN 2060 - Environmental Geology: Resources

    Credits: 4
    An introduction to the relationship between humans and the geological environment with a focus on natural resources, waste disposal, and climate change.
    Fulfills: STEM requirement in LS Core
  
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    GEN 3040 - Fluid Mechanics

    Credits: 4
    Fluid statics, principles of one-dimensional incompressible flow, derivation and applications of the continuity, energy, momentum equations. Viscous flow, flow in pipe lines and open channels. Fluid measurements and dimensional analysis.
    Corequisite(s): GEN 2012  and MTH 2219 .
  
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    GEN 4055 - Decision Analysis

    Credits: 4


    GEN 4055 (Decision Analysis) introduces the fundamentals of decision analysis with emphasis on real-world engineering and business applications. Main topics covered will include descriptive vs normative decision models, economic analysis, decisions under uncertainty, sensitivity analysis, scenario analysis, Monte-Carlo simulation, expectation-variance criterion, decision tree analysis, statistical decision techniques, multiple attribute decision making, utility theory, and group decision making.

    This course takes the perspective that engineering managers are primarily decision-makers. For instance, engineering managers routinely: (a) choose between various technologies, (b) allocate resources, (c) program capital investments, and (d) make repair or replace decisions, just to name a few. Over roughly the last quarter century, the fields of decision and management science have developed a variety of useful tools that promulgate rational decision processes. These approaches provide a means for structuring and resolving decision problems systematically. Thus, this course will spend the majority of its time covering these methods and techniques and discussing benefits that they might derive.
    Prerequisite(s): The prerequisite for undergraduate students is a course in statistics or probability.


Hospitality Management

  
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    HSP 3000 - Introduction to Hospitality Management

    Credits: 4
    The introduction to hospitality management course introduces the history, opportunities, problems, and trends of the hospitality industry. The course covers the organization of the various sectors of the hospitality industry including human resources, general business considerations, and management theory, and the impact of tourism on economic conditions, all within a global context. The basic purpose of this course is to provide general knowledge of the hospitality industry in order to prepare students for managerial roles in lodging and food service businesses. Major Topics to be Included: The Hospitality Industry and You, Resort Operations, Hospitality History, Commercial Food Service Businesses, Institutional Food Service, The Hotel-Motel Business Operations, Managed Services, Recreation, Attractions and Clubs, Gaming Entertainment, Meetings, Conventions and Expositions, Special Events, The Emerging Shape of Mass Market Tourism and the importance of Leadership and Management in driving Employee Engagement to create unique, memorable and personalized World Class Service experiences.
     
    Prerequisite(s): MGT 1100  
  
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    HSP 3100 - Hospitality & Tourism Marketing

    Credits: 4
    Studies principles and practices of marketing the services of the hotel and restaurant industry. Emphasizes approaching all sales and marketing activities from the customer viewpoint.   In this highly competitive age, marketing has become the foundation of the Hospitality Industry; for without a planned marketing program, properly developed and creatively carried out, there can be little in the way of profitable sales. Key challenges include: exploring ways to leverage virtual reality and augmented reality in marketing strategies, identifying new opportunities, improving the positioning and/or segmentation strategy of hospitality brands, developing new products, designing targeted promotional campaigns, leveraging social media, and building mutually beneficial channel relationships within the Hospitality and Tourism industry globally.
     
    Prerequisite(s): MKT 2205  
  
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    HSP 4000 - Hospitality Management Practicum

    Credits: 4
    The Hospitality Management Practicum course (worth 4 credits and includes a letter grade for the course) allows students to gain valuable experience in a work setting whereby they apply their classroom learning and develop career skills within the hospitality industry. Students work with their practicum supervisor and professor to gain insights into the routines, processes, activities, and contents of various hospitality organizations. Internships may be completed in for-profit, non-profit, or public-sector organizations and can be either paid or unpaid experiences. The Hospitality Management Practicum requires a three-way partnership: College-Student-Employer. The student is at the center of this arrangement; the student benefits from opportunities offered by both the school and employer. The college offers credits and guidance; the employer gives the student an opportunity in the “real world.” Ultimately, the student is responsible for balancing the needs of two “bosses.” The most successful students in this course are those who bring a mature, responsible, go - getter attitude and remain flexible and realistic, seeking ways to balance the sometimes - conflicting needs of school and internship schedules.   Internship sites are arranged by the student; support is provided by the Lucey Center for Business Advising (LCBA) and Merrimack’s O’Brien Center for Student Success. A student completes the internship application (found on and submitted through Handshake) and submits it with a resume to the LCBA to apply after the student has located a suitable internship. Once approved, the student is registered for HSP 4000. Four credit hours require a minimum of 180 hours in the internship context (i.e., an average of 13 hours per week).
    Prerequisite(s):  HSP 3000  and must submit application to be reviewed for approval prior to registration.
  
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    HSP 4020 - Second Business Internship

    Credits: 4


    The second business internship is available to students who have completed their first internship (ACC4010, FIN4010, MGT4010, or MKT4010), the Sport Management Practicum (SPM4000), the Accounting Co-Op (ACC4000), or the Hospitality Management Practicum (HSP40000) and who would like to gain credit for another internship experience. Paid and unpaid internships are an opportunity for students to gain experience in actual work settings where they can apply their classroom and other prior learning. Students will work with their internship supervisor and their professor to gain insights into the daily routines and the overall process, activities, and content of a particular setting or industry that is different from their first internship experience. Internships may be in for-profit, not-for-profit or public sector organizations depending on the interests of the student.

     

    Notes:

    If the student wishes to complete their second business internship at a company where they have already completed their first internship, it must be a significantly different work experience with a different supervisor.

    While there is no specific GPA requirement for the course, it is generally recommended that you have a minimum GPA of 2.70.

    The Internship must be secured (usually during the previous semester) and permission must be obtained from the professor prior to registration for the course.

     
    Prerequisite(s): HSP 4000  and faculty consent.

  
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    HSP 4100 - Introduction to the Travel Industry

    Credits: 4
    The course is designed to provide an overview and understanding of the Tourism industry, the World’s largest industry, to provide an understanding of the inner workings of the various branches of the industry, and the current and future opportunities for employment in the tourism industry.   We will look at the tourism industry through the lens of business, specifically by considering the management, marketing, and finance issues, most important to industry members. The role of intermediaries, technology, transportation modes, accommodations, cruise lines, destinations, attractions, and food and beverage operations are all covered in detail. As the importance of the industry has continued to grow, we will highlight the importance of the economic, political, environmental, and social/cultural impacts of tourism and the critical issues of sustainability Major topics to be covered include: The traveling public and tourism promoters, tourism service suppliers, and the hospitality environment. In addition, we will identify the components of the travel product-the suppliers and sellers-and describe the interrelationship between each. We will do this by summarizing major historical changes in the development of modern tourism, describing the operating structure, day-to-day activities, and job positions in the different segments of the tourism industry, and become familiar with periodicals and reference materials used by the travel industry.  

     
    Prerequisite(s): HSP 3000  

Human Development

  
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    HDE 1000 - Introduction to Human Development

    Credits: 4
    This course focuses on physical, cognitive, and social-emotional continuity and changes that occur throughout the lifespan. An introduction to research and theories in human development is included.
  
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    HDE 1020 - Introduction to Human Services

    Credits: 4
    This course is an introduction to what constitutes human services and how human service professionals engage in addressing the needs and concerns of populations from diverse backgrounds.  It includes the history of human services, a critical overview of policies and strategies, skills for addressing social issues as agents for social change, the ethical professional standards of human services, and familiarization with professions related to the field.
  
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    HDE 1050 - Applied Infancy Development

    Credits: 4
    This course is intended for undergraduate students majoring in human development. As an introductory course, the goal is to survey the field of infant development (from birth to three), its theories, and its methods. Students will explore what is known about typical and atypical development across the developmental domains including physical, language, cognitive, and social emotional development. The course will provide a framework for students to understand how development occurs across these domains and how researchers come to understand these various aspects of development. Additionally, students will explore the role of culture and context and its influence on infant development. 
    Prerequisite(s): HDE 1000  
  
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    HDE 2130 - Diversity, Social Justice, & Ethics

    Credits: 4
    Formerly: EDU2130
    This course will focus on issues of diversity and social justice within the context of PreK-12 education. Its purpose is to develop theoretical, conceptual, pedagogical, and curricular foundations for supporting issues of equity and access as well as marginalized individuals, groups, and peoples. Themes will include urban education, immigration and English- language status, and special education. Students will examine both systemic and curricular approaches within educational settings to develop a conceptual framework as well as the practical implications of these themes and issues.
    Fulfills: D, E and X in LS Core
  
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    HDE 2140 - Life Span Development

    Credits: 4
    This course focuses on the physical, cognitive, and psychosocial domains of human development and changes that occur through the normal life lifespan. Students will study factors that influence development such as cultural norms, family structure, education, socioeconomic status, wellness, geographical and housing location, and social/institutional structures. An introduction to current research and theories used to explain human growth and change is explored.
  
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    HDE 2230 - Applied Adolescent Development

    Credits: 4
    This course will focus on the physical, cognitive, social and emotional aspects of adolescent development from an applied perspective. Specifically, issues related to teaching adolescents in middle schools and high schools, grades 5- 12, will be considered. Students will engage in a service learning project to gain understanding of children in this age range.
    Prerequisite(s): EDU or HDHS students.
    Fulfills: X in LS Core
  
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    HDE 2240 - Adult Development

    Credits: 4
    This course will introduce students to theories and principles of adult development. The course will provide an overview of developmental issues, including the biological, cognitive, learning and social emotional realms, with specific implications for applied settings.
  
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    HDE 3000 - Research Methods & Applied Statistics in Human Development

    Credits: 4
    Formerly: HDE2000
    This is an undergraduate level course for students majoring in Human Development. As an introductory course, it is designed to expose students to the theoretical and philosophical foundations of the scientific method and the practice of research as it is conducted within the discipline of Human Development. The specific aims of this course are to guide students through the skills needed to develop a research project, to present that project in a written proposal, and to choose the appropriate analytic tools to analyze and interpret data for both an academic and a lay audience.
    Prerequisite(s): HDHS students; junior or senior status or permission of the instructor. 
    Fulfills: W and Q in LS Core
  
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    HDE 3050 - Developing Emotional Competency and Social Maturity in Youth

    Credits: 4
    Establishing practices in schools and in the field that promote emotional growth, mental health wellness and social maturity and independence are key aspects of development. This course will explore strategies for incorporating practices that promote the development of these skills in youth and establish safe environments for youth to learn and grow. Youth mental health first aid certification will an option offered through the course. Note: this course covers topics related to mental health crisis which might be sensitive for some.
 

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