Jun 26, 2022  
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog

Course Descriptions


 

Mathematics

  
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    MTH 3400 - Readings in Mathematics

    Credits: 4
    A course in readings in mathematical literature and in mathematical writing. Selected topics will be investigated within their historical and cultural context. Recent developments in the mathematical sciences will also be explored. Each student will be responsible for reading selected articles, writing several papers, completing a portfolio of quantitative problems, and researching a topic for final presentation.
    Prerequisite(s): MTH 1314  and MTH 1218 .
    Fulfills: W in LS Core.
    When Offered: Fall semester of odd-numbered years.
    Note: This course is offered as writing intensive and fulfills the W in LS Core.
  
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    MTH 3701 - Modeling and Simulation

    Credits: 4
    Introduction to modeling and computer simulation. Examples will be drawn from numerous areas in the physical, biological, and social sciences, and business. Probabilistic as well as deterministic models will be considered.
    Prerequisite(s): MTH 2220 , and CSC 1610  or CSC 1611, or consent of the instructor.
  
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    MTH 3725 - Numerical Analysis

    Credits: 4
    Theory and application of selected topics from numerical analysis. Topics include: solutions of equations and systems of equations, interpolation, numerical differentiation and integration, and numerical solution of differential equations. Error bounds are treated. Emphasis given to methods that can be implemented on a computer. If time allows, other topics may be added such as Least Squares and Eigenvalues.
    Prerequisite(s): MTH 1218 , and CSC 1610  or CSC 1611, or consent of the instructor.
  
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    MTH 4336 - Abstract Algebra

    Credits: 4
    This course is an introduction to the theory of groups, rings, and fields. Emphasis will be on abstract theorems, proofs, and rigorous mathematical reasoning.
    Prerequisite(s): MTH 1314  and MTH 3335 , or consent of the instructor.
    When Offered: Spring semester.
  
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    MTH 4343 - Real Analysis

    Credits: 4
    This course is an introduction, with emphasis on theory, to the foundations of the calculus of real valued functions of real variables. Topic will include uniform continuity, compactness, uniform convergence, differentiation, and integration.
    Prerequisite(s): MTH 1314  and MTH 2219 , or consent of the instructor.
    When Offered: Fall semester.
  
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    MTH 4600 - Topics in Mathematics

    Credits: 4
    Reading, lectures, study, and/or research in a branch of advanced mathematics in which a course is not regularly offered.
    Prerequisite(s): Consent of the instructor.
    Note: May be taken more than once.
  
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    MTH 4645 - Complex Analysis

    Credits: 4
    An introduction to the calculus of functions of a complex variable for students of science, engineering, and mathematics. Topics include complex differentiation, harmonic functions, the Cauchy-Riemann equations, contour integrals, the Cauchy integral theorem and Cauchy integral formula, Taylor and Laurent series, the residue theorem, and conformal mapping.
    Prerequisite(s): MTH 2219 .
  
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    MTH 4800 - Directed Study

    Credits: 4
    In lieu of a formal course, qualified upper-class students may propose an intensive program of reading under the direction of a member of the department. A student wishing to elect this course will be required to submit a proposal to the department and receive departmental approval prior to registration.
    Note: May be taken more than once.
  
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    MTH 4850 - Directed Research

    Credits: 4
    In lieu of a formal course, qualified upper-class students may propose an intensive program of undergraduate research under the direction of a member of the department. This will involve reading articles from mathematical journals and conducting research on open problems in mathematics, culminating in a presentation and/or thesis paper. A student wishing to elect this course will be required to submit a proposal to the department and receive departmental approval prior to registration.
    Fulfills: X in LS Core.
    Note: May be taken more than once.

Mathematics Education

  
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    MTE 1410 - Foundations of Mathematics I

    Credits: 4
    This course is the first of a three-part sequence designed to help prospective elementary school teachers develop a deep understanding of the underlying structure of mathematics. Topics will include: (1) exploration of the meaning number and the historical significance of place-value systems; (2) development of the standard arithmetic algorithms with analogies to algebra and geometry; (3) investigation of divisibility and many other aspects of elementary number theory; (4) proper communication of mathematical ideas using accurate terminology; (5) examination of the meaning and notations of the rational number system. The ideas of deductive justification and its importance, historical perspectives, and connections within mathematics and between math and other areas will play a large role throughout the course. Students are required to pass all three courses in this sequence prior to enrolling in EDU 3334 Teaching Mathematics.
    Fulfills: Q in LS Core

O’Brien Center

  
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    OBR 1000INT - Independent Internship

    Credits: 0
    Independent internship opportunities are available to students in a wide variety of fields and work settings. Students may register for an independent internship in the fall, spring or summer semester. Interested students should contact their career advisor in the O’Brien Center for more information or to discuss opportunities.
    Prerequisite(s): (1) Must have completed a minimum of 30 credit hours to participate, (2) Must have a 2.0 minimum GPA, (3) Must complete a minimum of 100 hours during the semester, (4) Must register the independent internship with the O’Brien Center using Advantage, (5) Student and site supervisor must set learning goals for the independent internship experience, (6) Student and site supervisor must complete a post internship reflection of the experience. Student must have approval through the O’Brien Center with oversight from the O’Brien Center Faculty Advisory Board.
    Fulfills: X in LS Core.
  
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    OBR 1050 - Career Exploration and Development

    Credits: 1
    The Foundations of Career Exploration and Development course will serve as the initial platform for orienting all students to the role, value, and techniques of career exploration and development.  The one-credit course will focus on the foundational knowledge, skills, and tools necessary for students to be successful in exploring a career to pursue and developing the skills and tools necessary for success in that career.  The career development coursework will focus on the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) competencies that are essential for success in pursuing a job and thriving in the workplace.  Students will receive a thorough grounding in career competencies and develop tangible career deliverables while also building a network of academic and career support.  Class time will be focused on practicing learned skills and knowledge through pair-shares, discussions and reflection.  Emphasis will be placed on students thinking like a designer to build their own futures with curiosity, creativity and determination, developing tools to determine a direction in life even when the destination is unclear.  Upon successful completion of this course, students will have demonstrated a foundational level of the NACE competencies, developed tangible and intangible career readiness tools, and built a career capital and a network of support.    

Philosophy

  
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    PHL 1000 - Introduction to Philosophy

    Credits: 4
    This is a first course in philosophy focusing on classic questions that have stirred the perennial human quest for wisdom. We will explore such questions as: Are humans free or determined? How do the mind and body interact? Is ethics just relative to each person or society? Should there be any limits to the political freedom of citizens? Does God exist? The course will introduce students to the methods and culture of philosophy: sympathetic understanding, critical analysis, fair argumentation, and a persistent desire to know the truth whatever it is. The focus and questions covered will be determined by each instructor.
    Fulfills: PHL in LS Core
  
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    PHL 1100 - Narratives of the Self

    Credits: 4
    This course focuses on the self through the stories that it tells about itself. What is the “self”?  Should we be individualists or consider ourselves first and foremost members of communities?  How is the self affected by its social surroundings and political contexts?  Is there a meaning or purpose to life that is individual to each of us?  Both philosophy and literature present opportunities to consider questions such these and many others about the nature of the self and its relationship to the community around it.  This course explores different ways of thinking about selfhood by comparing different philosophical conceptions of the self and analyzing how various works of literature confirm, challenge, or complicate those theories. 

     
    Fulfills: LS Core Requirement in PHL
  
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    PHL 1200 - Philosophy through Film

    Credits: 4
    Film has proven itself to be an excellent medium for presenting and challenging philosophical ideas. For this reason, this course introduces students to some of the central questions and ideas of philosophy through an examination of how they are dramatized in several feature length films. Some questions that may be considered include the following:  Does life have a meaning?  What makes a person decent, and why should we be decent?  What is the nature of reality, and how do we know what is real?  What is the connection between memory and personal identity?  Do individuals have a right to rebel against society or a duty to support it?  
    Fulfills: LS Core requirement in Philosophy
  
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    PHL 1300 - Identity, Meaning, and Purpose

    Credits: 4
    This course explores questions about identity, meaning, and purpose. Who am I? What is the nature of the self and personal identity? How are social identities formed, and why do they matter? What makes life meaningful? Given all the suffering and hardships that human beings must endure, what makes life worth living? Is there a purpose or point to it all? What is the relationship between happiness, meaningfulness, and morality? We will seek answers to these philosophical and personal questions by reading philosophers of the past and present.
    Fulfills: PHL in LS Core
  
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    PHL 2020 - Perspectives on the Good Life

    Credits: 4
    This course focuses on what it means to live a good life.  Before it comes to an end, how shall I spend the life that I have? What would make that life genuinely worth living? We will seek the guidance of many masters: East and West, ancient and modern, women and men and from diverse races. We have much to consider, but the main challenge for each of us is to shape a perspective that we can each embrace as our own.  Area Requirement for Philosophy:  Ethics
    Prerequisite(s): Any 1000 level course in philosophy
    Fulfills: E and W in LS Core
  
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    PHL 2030 - Contemporary Moral Problems

    Credits: 4
    This course explores a variety of ethical questions and topics in contemporary life with the aim of addressing them as complex and multi-faceted issues. Topics addressed may include drug legalization, free speech, abortion and reproductive rights, genetic engineering, food and agriculture, animal rights and welfare, environmental ethics, euthanasia and assisted suicide, war and terrorism, global ethical issues (humanitarian intervention, global economic issues such as trade, wages, and working conditions), criminal justice and punishment, sexual ethics, and ethics in friendships, romantic relationships, and parent-child relationships, among other topics. Area Requirement for Philosophy:  Ethics
    Prerequisite(s): Any 1000 level course in philosophy
    Fulfills: E in LS Core
  
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    PHL 2040 - Introduction to Political Philosophy

    Credits: 4
    This course provides a critical examination of some of the basic issues in political philosophy: the purpose and justification of government, the legitimate extent of government authority over the individual, a citizen’s obligation to obey the law, and the nature of rights and justice.  Area Requirement for Philosophy:  Ethics, History
    Prerequisite(s): Any 1000 level course in philosophy
    Fulfills: E in LS Core
  
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    PHL 2050 - Ethics in the Professions

    Credits: 4
    This course is designed to introduce students to the three major ethical theories: Natural Law, Deontology, and Utilitarianism. After the students have been familiarized with the fundamental principles and with the logical structure of moral reasoning, we will examine some of the many moral problems that arise in the professional lives of doctors, lawyers, engineers, advertisers, and others. Topics will include privacy, confidentiality, deception, commutative and distributive justice in hiring and compensation, etc. The course will stress case studies in the form of group discussions and presentations of cases in class by students.  Area Requirement for Philosophy:  Ethics
    Prerequisite(s): Any 1000 level course in philosophy
    Fulfills: E in LS Core
  
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    PHL 2060 - Biomedical Ethics

    Credits: 4


    This course consists of a critical examination of moral issues in medicine and bioethics. Topics may include: the physician-patient relationship; informed consent; research ethics; issues at the end of life such as euthanasia, physician assisted suicide and the use of advance directives; reproductive technologies, genetic testing and therapy, etc. Ethical theories and case studies will be introduced to help analyze the chosen issues.  Area Requirement for Philosophy:  Ethics

     
    Prerequisite(s): Any 1000 level course in philosophy
    Fulfills: E in LS Core

  
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    PHL 2070 - Environmental Ethics

    Credits: 4
    Environmental Ethics concerns humanity’s relationship with nature. In addition to questions about our moral obligations to other humans, animals, plants, ecosystems, and future generations, this course will also look at recent work on the Land Ethic, Ecofascism, Deep Ecology, Global Ecocentrism, Ecofeminism, Social Ecology, and Sustainability. We will begin with a brief look at some background texts before turning to philosophical analysis of such contemporary issues as climate change, renewable energy, pollution, and sustainability.  Area Requirement for Philosophy:  Ethics
    Prerequisite(s): Any 1000 level course in philosophy
    Fulfills: E in LS Core
  
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    PHL 2080 - Approaches to Ethics

    Credits: 4
    How can we determine what is ethically right and what is ethically wrong? Is what is right or wrong determined solely by the consequences of our actions? Or do our motives and intentions also matter? Which traits make someone a good person and which traits make someone a bad person? What kind of life should we strive to live if we want to be good? Do we need to try to think rationally in order to make the right ethical choices? And can we also be guided by our feelings and emotions? Can we know for sure that any particular choice is the ethically right one? This course explores responses to these questions from a variety of different philosophical approaches and thinkers. Area Requirement for Philosophy:  Ethics
    Prerequisite(s): Any 1000 level course in philosophy
    Fulfills: E in LS Core
  
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    PHL 2090 - Values in a Technological Culture

    Credits: 4
    This course engages in a critical examination of the way in which technological innovation has shaped our modern culture. Students will study major ethical traditions, pursue individual research projects on particular areas of technology, suggest solutions to ethical problems that arise there, and report their conclusions.  Area Requirement for Philosophy:  Ethics
    Prerequisite(s): Any 1000 level course in philosophy
    Fulfills: E in LS Core
  
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    PHL 2100 - Ethical Issues Concerning Gender

    Credits: 4
    This course explores ethical issues related to sex and gender with particular attention to how they are experienced in our society. Topics may include the gender wage gap, employment and workplace discrimination, sexual harassment and sexual violence, reproductive ethics and justice, gendered labor, representations of gender and sexuality in media, etc. The course involves critical analysis of these topics by applying philosophical ideas and perspectives on inequality and equality, gender stereotypes, gender roles and norms, sexism and misogyny, and objectification. Area Requirement for Philosophy:  Ethics
    Prerequisite(s): Any 1000 level course in philosophy
    Fulfills: E, D and W in LS Core
  
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    PHL 2110 - Environmental Philosophy

    Credits: 4
    What is nature? What is the human place in it? What kinds of changes can humanity make in an environment before it is no longer natural? Are practices like climate engineering and ecological restoration the same kind of thing? What is the proper role of science in environmental decision-making? How does the language we use to talk about nature alter the practices we perceive to be ethically responsible? This course will examine questions such as these in an effort to understand better the human relationship to nature and how best we might live within our native environments.  Area Requirement for Philosophy:  Ethics, Reality
    Prerequisite(s): Any 1000 level course in philosophy
    Fulfills: E in LS Core
  
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    PHL 2120 - Ethics, Ecology, and the Beauty of Nature

    Credits: 4
    Normally the beauty of nature is just taken for granted, but how would we describe what makes nature beautiful? Is beauty equivalent to the ecology of the system? Is natural beauty just a cultural idea? Do we have a responsibility to preserve natural beauty? To create it? Should we judge natural landscape and human created landscapes according to the same standards? This course examines these types of questions in order for students to reflect upon the beauty (or lack thereof) found in the world around them.  Area Requirement for Philosophy:  Ethics
    Prerequisite(s): Any 1000 level course in philosophy
    Fulfills: E and W in LS Core
  
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    PHL 2130 - Food Justice

    Credits: 4
    This course explores ethical and social justice issues involved in food and argricultural practices.  It considers both questions of personal ethics and takes an ecological, systems-based approach to how food is produced, transported, distributed, marketed, prepared, and consumed.  It examines key ethical and political theories and principles that can be used to evalute choices, habits, and practices concerning food.  Topics include: the environmental effects of argiculture and food production, how workers and farmers fare in a globalized argricultural system, the relationship between food production and immigration, food accessibility and insecurity (including hunger and malnutrition, both locally and globally), social and cultural norms surrounding food (including those related to health and bodies), and food as a commodity and agriculture as a business. 
    Prerequisite(s): Any 1000 level course in philosophy
    Fulfills: E in Ls Core
  
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    PHL 2200 - History of Ancient Philosophy

    Credits: 4
    From the beginnings of their literature, the ancient Greeks displayed a steady concern and even preoccupation with what human beings may know and what may lie concealed from our knowing. This course will provide a survey of Greek philosophical thought organized around the theme of the problem of human knowledge, beginning with the Presocratics, then turning to dialogues by Plato and Aristotle’s comprehensive approach to nature and human knowledge, and concluding with the Stoics, Epicureans, and Skeptics.  
    Prerequisite(s): Any 1000 level course in philosophy
    Fulfills: W and H in LS Core
  
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    PHL 2222 - Ethics in Engineering

    Credits: 4
    This course examines the ethical dimensions of professional engineering.  It addresses questions such as: What ethical challenges might engineers face as professionals?  What considerations should inform their choices?  What obligations do they have to one another and to the public? In what ways might engineering projects reflect the values and prejudices of the broader communities in which they work?  Students will become familiar with the three major ethical theories-deontology, utilitarianism, and virtue ethics-and we will learn to apply them to a variety of real world case studies.  Special attention will be paid to professional integrity, public safety, and whistleblowing.
    Prerequisite(s): Any 1000 level course in philosophy
    Fulfills: E in LS Core
  
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    PHL 2250 - Philosophy of Happiness

    Credits: 4
    What is happiness? What makes people happy? Can one person make another person happy? How can anyone judge whether someone else is happy? These are perennial questions not only for inquisitive minds but also for thoughtful human beings. Faced with economic, environmental, and ethical challenges, people should wonder whether happiness can be understood mainly and mostly in terms of pleasure, power, and profit. Focusing on the connection between a happy life and a virtuous life, this course explores how happiness can be defined, asks whether it can be measured, and examines the clearly indispensable but often overestimated role that it plays in a flourishing life.  Area Requirement for Philosophy:  Ethics
    Prerequisite(s): Any 1000 level course in philosophy
    Fulfills: E in LS Core
  
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    PHL 2310 - Socrates and the Examined Life

    Credits: 4
    In this course, students will focus on the ethical issues, provocations, and example of the Athenian philosopher Socrates (469-399 BCE). Though Socrates himself wrote nothing-everything we know about him was recorded by others-his inquiries into virtue, justice, and piety, his relentless cross-examination of others, and his insistence that “the unexamined life is not worth living” have set the questions and shaped the methods of a large part of ethical thinking ever since. Students will encounter Socrates primarily through a series of philosophical dialogues by his pupil Plato. But to develop a fuller and more critical understanding, students will also read a perceptive ancient comic lampoon of Socratic moral instruction along with key later responses to the enigmatic Socrates and his teachings.  Area Requirement for Philosophy:  Ethics, History
     
    Prerequisite(s): Any 1000 level course in philosophy
    Fulfills: E in LS Core
  
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    PHL 2330 - History of Medieval Philosophy

    Credits: 4
    The course will survey the history of Medieval philosophy.  It will pay special attention to the conflicting demands of the Medieval inheritance, the symbolic struggle between Athens and Jerusalem. On the one hand, as religious believers Medieval thinkers placed faith and Scripture at the pinnacle of their investigations; on the other hand, as philosophers they inherited a tradition of rational human thought begun by the pagan Greeks, a tradition that did not give privileged status to faith or revelation, but which nevertheless compelled their respect by its intellectual strength.    Area Requirement for Philosophy:  History, Reality
     
    Prerequisite(s): Any 1000 level course in philosophy
  
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    PHL 2350 - Philosophy of Augustine

    Credits: 4
    The works of Augustine focus on perennial ethical questions and moral problems, for example, freedom and responsibility, individuals and communities, justice and injustice, power and peace, imperialism and oppression, and tolerance and intolerance. This course examines the Augustinian approach to ethical reasoning and clarifies how many of Augustine’s positions are related to his arguments about values with those who think differently from him, especially the dominant philosophers of the Roman Empire, the Stoics and the Neo-Platonists. Classes focus on teaching students to engage in rigorous but respectful discussions and to apply valid rules of ethical reasoning in order to learn how to make sound moral decisions and resolve moral dilemmas in their own lives.  Area Requirement for Philosophy:  Ethics, History
    Prerequisite(s): Any 1000 level course in philosophy
    Fulfills: E and W in LS Core
  
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    PHL 2420 - Wisdoms of Asia

    Credits: 4
    A philosophical examination of the most influential traditional wisdoms of Asia-Hindu, Buddhist, Confucian, and Taoist-this course considers the systems of value that emerge from such classics as the Bhagavad Gita, Dhammapada, Analects, and the Tao Te Ching. It clarifies these Eastern systems, where appropriate, by comparing and contrasting them with the value systems of Western philosophical and religious traditions. Area Requirement for Philosophy:  Ethics, History

     
    Prerequisite(s): Any 1000 level course in philosophy
    Fulfills: D and E in LS Core
  
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    PHL 2500 - Theories of Justice

    Credits: 4
    This course will critically examine alternative theories of justice, including libertarianism, socialism, liberalism, communitarianism, and feminism.  Area Requirement for Philosophy:  Ethics
    Prerequisite(s): Any 1000 level course in philosophy
    Fulfills: E in LS Core
  
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    PHL 2600 - Philosophy of Education

    Credits: 4
    “Educate” comes from a Latin word meaning to lead out of. But when we educate, what do we lead students out of and what do we lead them into? Does education develop our nature, or reform it? How has education been viewed over history? Students will engage in critical examination of both classic and contemporary texts. Special attention will be paid to three themes: democracy and education, the role of education in a pluralistic society, and the special challenges of Catholic higher education.  Area Requirement for Philosophy:  Ethics, Knowledge

     
    Prerequisite(s): Any 1000 level course in philosophy
    Fulfills: E in LS Core
  
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    PHL 2700 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences

    Credits: 4
    How do the various social sciences (economics, history, political science, psychology, and sociology) conceptualize and value human activity? What methods and explanatory categories are shared and at which points do the various disciplines diverge? This course examines ethical, epistemological, and ontological assumptions in the historical development of the social sciences as a way to answer these questions.
     
    Prerequisite(s): Any 1000 level course in philosophy
  
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    PHL 2730 - Philosophy of Psychology

    Credits: 4
    This course is a critical examination of the philosophical issues related to psychology. With an emphasis on cognitive and developmental psychology, the course covers such topics as: concept formation, language acquisition, metaphors, reductionistic vs. holistic explanations, emergence, and creativity. The course will also isolate and evaluate the metaphysical and epistemological assumptions made by psychologists today.   Area Requirement for Philosophy:  Knowledge
     
    Prerequisite(s): Any 1000 level course in philosophy
  
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    PHL 2750 - Thinking through Race and Racism

    Credits: 4
    This course examines race and racism from a philosophical perspective: What is race? Is it something biological, cultural, or is its reality primary social?  How can we define racism and what are its origins?  Does thinking in terms of the idea of “race” perpetuate racism?  Is all race-related wrongdoing or harm really “racism”?  What are current examples of racism?  Should “color blindness” be an ideal or is it a way of ignoring the reality of race and racism?  How do people from different racial and ethnic groups experience race and racism? What does it take to challenge racism?   
     
    Prerequisite(s): Any 1000 level course in philosophy
  
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    PHL 2850 - Philosophical Hermeneutics

    Credits: 4
    Philosophical hermeneutics investigates the human experience of understanding in an inclusive way. The course thematizes how understanding operates in the humanities, the natural sciences, the social sciences, the technical and vocational disciplines, as well as in ordinary life. The focus is on understanding as such and not as restricted to any specific content. Yet comparisons and contrasts also emerge, since diverse examples of understanding and misunderstanding from all areas dominate class discussions. Gadamer’s Truth and Method serves as a first guide to questions about evidence, knowledge, and truth in art, history, and literature. Other participants in the issues-driven dialogue include Schleiermacher, Dilthey, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Derrida, and Spivak.   Area Requirement for Philosophy:  History, Knowledge
    Prerequisite(s): Any 1000 level course in philosophy
    Fulfills: W in LS Core
  
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    PHL 3010 - Human Rights: Theory and Practice

    Credits: 4
    In this course, we will critically examine different theories of human rights, including non-Western approaches to human rights, and we will consider the development of international human rights law. We will examine the concept of human rights and the moral and political foundations of this idea. We will analyze the distinction between civil and political rights, socio-economic rights, and group rights, and we will consider challenges to socio-economic rights and group rights. We will also examine challenges to international human rights discourse, particularly the challenge of cultural relativism. Finally, we will focus on particular cases and issues, such as women’s rights, LGBT rights, racial non-discrimination, the rights of refugees, indigenous rights and the right to self-determination, subsistence rights (food, housing, health care), the prohibition of torture, humanitarian intervention, and environmental human rights. In addition to reading philosophical texts, we will read international human rights treaties and cases, and we will consider how the system of international human rights law operates in practice.  Area Requirement for Philosophy:  Ethics
    Prerequisite(s): Any 1000 level course
    Fulfills: E in LS Core
  
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    PHL 3020 - Philosophy of Law

    Credits: 4
    This course investigates philosophical issues that are central to the law. Topics may include the nature of law, the relationship between law and morality, the role of judges and adjudication, the nature of rights, the ideal of the rule of law, the justification of punishment, and the feminist critique of the law. Students will critically read some of the most influential philosophers in legal theory as well as important cases, judgments and statutes. Some questions that we will explore include: Why must I obey the law? Can an unjust law still be a law? Can civil disobedience be justified? To what extent, and on what grounds, should the law not infringe on an individual’s right to liberty, free speech and freedom of religion? Under what conditions should a person be held legally responsible for their acts? 

     
    Prerequisite(s): Any PHL 1000 level course.
    Fulfills: E in LS Core
  
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    PHL 3030 - Global Justice

    Credits: 4
    This course examines questions of justice that arise beyond the state and between states. We will begin by considering the question of how justice between states or at the global level differs from justice within states. While cosmopolitan theorists emphasize that we have duties of justice towards all human beings, nationalists argue that we have stronger duties towards our fellow citizens. Is it morally permissible for states to act in their own national interests when this harms the people of other states? While we will primarily be considering questions of justice from a moral perspective, we will also consider current international law. Topics will include issues of justice concerning international human rights law, world poverty, refugees, climate change, military intervention, humanitarian intervention, international trade, and global labor practices.  Area Requirement for Philosophy:  Ethics
    Prerequisite(s): Any 1000 level course in Philosphy.  
    Fulfills: E in LS Core
  
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    PHL 3040 - Philosophy of Religion

    Credits: 4
    Grappling with questions of ultimate religious import: Does God exist? Is there a life for us after we die? If God made the world, how come there is so much evil? Do you have to be religious to be moral (or vice versa)? Do faith and reason contradict each other? Do mystics have a special knowledge of these matters? Is there only one true religion? Students will write a term paper researching a major question and then present their own reasoned position.  Area Requirement for Philosophy:  Reality
    Prerequisite(s): Any 1000 level course.
  
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    PHL 3050 - Philosophy of Science

    Credits: 4
    The course provides a critical examination of the methods and goals of science, as well as an analysis of how political, social, religious, ethical, environmental, cultural, and technological factors have affected the development of the sciences and how they continue to have an impact on the way that science is practiced today.  Area Requirement for Philosophy:  Knowledge, Reality

     
    Prerequisite(s): Any 1000 level course.
  
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    PHL 3060 - Justice in Health and Healthcare

    Credits: 4


    The course offers a critical examination of justice in health and healthcare at the collective level. After an initial overview of the concept of justice, we will address several problem areas, such as the demands of social justice as applied to the provision of healthcare, the social determinants of health and what they mean for how healthcare is experienced and utilized by marginalized groups, and justice in healthcare rationing. Questions that may be considered include: Is there a right to health care? How should we determine who receives an organ transplant when organs are scarce? And why do certain minority groups receive worse healthcare than members of other groups and how can this be rectified? Case studies will be introduced to help analyze these issues.  Area Requirement for Philosophy:  Ethics

     

     
    Prerequisite(s): Any 1000 level course. 
    Fulfills: E in LS Core

  
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    PHL 3080 - Virtue Ethics

    Credits: 4
    In recent years virtue ethics has emerged from a long and rich history to become one of the three major approaches in contemporary normative ethics. Whereas the deontological approach to ethical questions emphasizes rules, and the consequentialist (or utilitarian) approach emphasizes results, virtue ethics emphasizes character. This course examines the distinctive approach theoretical structure, practical applicability, specific questions, and future trajectory of virtue ethics. It will be helpful to all those students of ethics who want to appreciate the diversity of the discipline, and useful to all those who want to understand the enormous impact of virtue ethics on contemporary philosophy, culture, and life. Above all, the course provides students with an excellent opportunity to examine one of life’s fundamental ethical questions: How can we honestly live genuinely good lives, that is, lives that are happy, virtuous, and pleasant?
    Prerequisite(s): Any 1000 level course.
    Fulfills: E in LS Core
  
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    PHL 3160 - History of Modern Philosophy

    Credits: 4
    This course traces the empiricist and rationalist foundations of modern philosophy, as well as its relations to developments in those fields which have come to be known as natural sciences and social sciences, by close readings of the texts of Bacon, Descartes, Hobbes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant. Attention is also given to the question concerning why the traditional approach to the so-called “History of Modern Philosophy” has been one-sidedly male-dominated, Western, and white.   Area Requirement for Philosophy:  History, Knowledge, Reality
    Prerequisite(s): Any 1000 level course and another course in Philosophy or the permission of the professor.
    When Offered: H in LS Core
  
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    PHL 3180 - A Meaningful Life

    Credits: 4
    The course explores the question concerning how to create a meaningful life. It examines the literature composed by “existentialist” authors such as Kierkegaard, Dostoevsky, Nietzsche, Unamuno, Heidegger, Sartre, de Beauvoir, Camus, and Ellison. These thinkers continue to exercise powerful influences on informed discussions of contemporary ethical issues and moral problems, for example, social justice and injustice, punishment and responsibility, gender relations, imperialism and racism, the origin and evolution of human values, and the roles of reason and religion in ethics. Classes encourage students to engage in rigorous but respectful discussion and to apply ethical reasoning in their moral decisions and actions.
    Prerequisite(s): PHL 1000   or PHL 1100  or PHL 1200  
    Fulfills: E in LS Core
  
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    PHL 3210 - Philosophy of Mind

    Credits: 4
    The central question addressed in the philosophy of mind is: How are mental states related to physical states? This course will begin by considering the historical and contemporary theories that attempt to address this problem, including dualism, behaviorism, the identity theory, eliminative materialism, functionalism, and embodied cognition. The second half of the course will be devoted to a discussion of a number of contemporary issues in the philosophy of mind, including intentionality, personal identity, consciousness, qualia, language, and social cognition.  Area Requirement for Philosophy:  Knowledge, Reality
    Prerequisite(s): Any 1000 level course.
  
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    PHL 3560 - Bioethical Dramas

    Credits: 4
    Bioethical Dramas focuses on ethical issues in medicine and their portrayal in popular culture. The central questions explored in this class are: How does the practice of modern medicine impact our lives? And what do portrayals of medical practice in popular culture reveal to us about how we view ourselves and others? Students will gain knowledge of current bioethical issues through the reading of short philosophical texts, case studies, journalistic pieces, experiential theater activities, and the critical analysis of dramatic works in script and film. Readings and other class preparation will facilitate students’ ability to understand and evaluate the impact of the history and current state of medicine and biomedical research on the human condition. 
    Prerequisite(s): Any 1000-level PHL course
    Cross-Listed: THR 3560  
  
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    PHL 3650 - Aesthetics and Human Values

    Credits: 4
    We are so immersed in the various forms of artistic expression and production in our daily lives-whether visual, musical, literary, or architectural-that we seldom stop to consider what art is and why it has such power to affect us. What makes something art? Are there objective artistic standards, or are all standards merely subjective preferences? How can different art works sometimes excite us, sometimes calm us, make us laugh, and make us cry? These are some of the questions we shall ask as we study art’s power, meaning, and social and political dimensions. Depending on the interests of the instructor, the course may emphasize a particular art form, such as painting or music.  Area Requirement for Philosophy:  Ethics

     
    Prerequisite(s): Any 1000 level course.
    Fulfills: AL, X, E in LS Core
  
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    PHL 4020 - Epistemology

    Credits: 4
    4 This course examines the theories of knowledge and the problems associated with knowledge that have been and are being debated in the philosophical literature. Topics include the correspondence, coherence, and pragmatic theories of truth. Other topics include relativism, skepticism, foundationalism, reliabilism, naturalized epistemology, the problem of induction, and the myth of the given.  Area Requirement for Philosophy:  Knowledge

     
    Prerequisite(s): Any 1000 level  and another course in Philosophy or the permission of the professor.
  
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    PHL 4030 - Metaphysics

    Credits: 4
    4 “All things excellent are as difficult as they are rare” (Spinoza). Metaphysics is devoted to the study of some of the rarest, most excellent, and most difficult philosophical topics. Studying writings of Aristotle, Kant, Hegel, Heidegger, and other philosophers, this course explores radically different answers to the question concerning being: being is substance (and pre-eminently the highest substance, God); it is the necessary ground for human thought; it is the ultimate resolution of all contradictions inherent in thought; it is that which we approach through our questions but never reach. But even apart from their answers, the philosophers chosen reveal their diversity as thinkers by the variety of ways in which they understand and approach the question concerning being.  Area Requirement for Philosophy:  Reality

     
    Prerequisite(s): Any 1000 level and another course in Philosophy or the permission of the professor.
  
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    PHL 4200 - Special Topics in Philosophy

    Credits: 4
    This course will offer an in-depth study of a philosopher or philosophical issue.
    Prerequisite(s): Any 1000 course and another course in Philosophy or the permission of the professor.
    Three hours a week.
  
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    PHL 4800 - Directed Study

    Credits: 4
    This course allows upper-class students who have acquired sufficient knowledge through a variety of courses in philosophy to pursue an intensive program of readings in a specialized area under the direction of a member of the department.

     
    Prerequisite(s): Approval of the Chair and consent of the member of the department whose supervision the Directed Study will be conducted.

Physics

  
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    PHY 1632 - Galileo Galilei

    Credits: 4
    This course investigates the central role Galileo Galilei played in the development of modern science, both in terms of content and procedure. Galileo’s contributions will be put into cultural and scientific context through a comparison with the contributions of his predecessors and contemporaries; including those of Aristotle, Ptolemy, Tycho, Copernicus, and Kepler. The social, scientific and philosophical forces that Galileo faced in promoting a heliocentric model of the solar system will be considered. This examination will highlight the revolutionary ideas at the core of Galileo’s experimentally based natural philosophy, ideas which are central to the scientific revolution that continues to this day. Experiments similar to those performed by Galileo will be performed in lab (e.g. Galileo’s inclined plane experiments) and examined in order to illustrate the scientific reasoning employed by Galileo in his works. Assigned reading and subsequent discussion will be based on both primary and secondary sources.
    Fulfills: STEM requirements in LS Core.
  
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    PHY 2201 - General Physics I

    Credits: 4
    First semester of a one-year introduction to physics, without calculus. Topics normally include vectors, kinematics, Newton’s laws of motion, work and energy, momentum, torque, statics, and circular and rotational motion.  
    Prerequisite(s): MTH 1000  or equivalent.
    Corequisite(s): PHY2001L (concurrent enrollment)
    Fulfills: Q and STEM requirement in LS Core.
    Four and a half to five hours of integrated lecture, discussion, and group problem-solving a week.
  
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    PHY 2202 - General Physics II

    Credits: 4
    Second semester of a one-year introduction to physics, without calculus. Topics normally include oscillations, electric charge, electric fields and forces, electric potential and potential energy, electric current, DC circuits, magnetism, Faraday’s Law, and geometric optics.  
    Prerequisite(s): PHY 2201  or PHY 2211 .
    Corequisite(s): PHY2002L (concurrent enrollment)
    Fulfills: Q and STEM requirement in LS Core.
    Four and a half to five hours of integrated lecture, discussion, and group problem-solving a week.
  
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    PHY 2211 - Physics I

    Credits: 4
    First semester of a one-year calculus-based introduction to physics, for students in engineering, chemistry, biology, physics, and others. Topics normally include vectors, kinematics, Newton’s laws of motion, work and energy, momentum, rotational and orbital motion, torque, angular momentum, and oscillations.  
    Prerequisite(s): MTH 1217  or MTH 1016  with a final grade of B or higher and Corequisite: MTH 1217  
    Corequisite(s): PHY2001L (concurrent enrollment)
    Fulfills: Mathematics/Science distribution requirement. Q and a STEM requirement in LS Core.
    Four and a half to five hours of integrated lecture, discussion, and group problem-solving a week.
  
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    PHY 2212 - Physics II

    Credits: 4
    Second semester of a one-year calculus-based introduction to physics, for students in engineering, chemistry, biology, physics, and others. Topics normally include electric charge, electric fields and forces, electric potential and potential energy, fields and potentials produced by continuous charge distributions, DC circuit analysis, magnetic fields and forces, Faraday’s law, motors and generators, waves, geometric optics, and (instructor option) special relativity. 
    Prerequisite(s): PHY 2211  
    Corequisite(s): PHY2002L (concurrent enrollment)
    Fulfills: Q and STEM requirement in LS Core.
    Four and a half to five hours of integrated lecture, discussion, and group problem-solving a week.
  
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    PHY 2213 - Introduction to Thermodynamics

    Credits: 2
    A two-credit (one semester) introduction to thermodynamics. Topics include the ideal gas law, the molecular interpretation of temperature, the first law of thermodynamics, the second law of thermodynamics (including a quantitative treatment of entropy), heat transfer, and applications of the laws and relations of thermodynamics to thermal expansion, phase changes, calorimetry, heat engines, and refrigerators.
    Prerequisite(s): PHY 2211  and MTH 1218 .
  
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    PHY 2241 - Introduction to Quantum Physics

    Credits: 4
    A one-semester introduction to quantum physics. Topics include special relativity (at option of the instructor), the failure of classical physics in the quantum domain (as illustrated by the photoelectric effect and the double slit experiment), the dual wave-particle nature of light and matter, the wave function and its interpretation, the Schrodinger equation and its solutions for selected bound and unbound problems, and the physics of atoms, nuclei, and elementary particles.
    Prerequisite(s): PHY 2212  and MTH 1218  or instructor permission.
    Fulfills: Q and a STEM requirement in LS Core.
  
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    PHY 3008 - Introduction to General Relativity

    Credits: 4
    In Einstein’s theory of general relativity, gravitation is understood as an interaction between mass and spacetime. In the elegant words of Taylor and Wheeler: “spacetime tells mass how to move; mass tells spacetime how to curve.” In this course we bypass Einstein’s field equations (the subject of advanced graduate physics courses) and go straight to the Schwarzschild metric, which makes general relativity - the best theory of gravity that has been developed to date - accessible to anyone willing to use algebra, differential calculus, and a handful of integrals. Topics include special relativity, gravitational time dilation, the role of general relativity in the Global Positioning System, the advance of the perihelion of Mercury, gravitational deflection of light, and orbital mechanics in the vicinity of a black hole.
    Prerequisite(s): MTH 1218  and PHY 2212 , or permission of the instructor.
    Fulfills: Q and STEM requirement in LS Core.
    When Offered: On sufficient demand.
  
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    PHY 3200 - Mathematical Physics

    Credits: 4
    Mathematical methods employed throughout science are investigated with a particular emphasis on those used in physics. Topics normally include infinite series, complex algebra, differential equations (including method of power series substitution), Fourier series, operators and matrices (including eigenvalue problems), coordinate systems, and vector calculus. Further topics may be included at the discretion of the instructor.
    Prerequisite(s): PHY 2241 , MTH 2219 .
  
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    PHY 3304 - Thermal Physics

    Credits: 4
    The laws of thermodynamics, their application to single and multi-component systems, and their underlying foundation in statistical mechanics.
    Prerequisite(s): PHY 2241  and MTH 2219 .
  
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    PHY 3311 - Analytical Mechanics I

    Credits: 4
    Newton’s laws, motion of a particle, oscillations, Newtonian gravitation, rotating and other non-inertial reference frames, motion of rigid bodies.
    Prerequisite(s): PHY 2241  or permission of the department, MTH 2219 .
    Corequisite(s): MTH 2220 .
  
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    PHY 3325 - Physical Optics

    Credits: 4
    An introduction to the scalar theory of diffraction. Topics include the scalar wave equation and its applications, coherence and comparison of thermal and laser sources, interferometry and its applications to instrumentation, and linear optical systems analyses for imaging.
    Prerequisite(s): PHY 2241  and MTH 2219 .
    When Offered: On sufficient demand.
  
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    PHY 3345 - Electromagnetic Theory I

    Credits: 4
    This course focuses on the development and application of the integral and differential forms of Maxwell’s equations. Specific topics typically include vector calculus, electrostatics and magnetostatics in vacuum, Laplace’s equation and related boundary value problems, electromagnetic induction, the wave equation and electromagnetic waves.
    Prerequisite(s): PHY 2241 , MTH 2219  and MTH 2220 .
  
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    PHY 4412 - Quantum Mechanics I

    Credits: 4
    Schrodinger equation, Dirac notation, infinite square well, quantum simple harmonic oscillator, angular momentum, spin, the hydrogen atom, and (time permitting) further topics chosen by the instructor.
    Prerequisite(s): PHY 2241 , MTH 2219 , MTH 2220 .
    Corequisite(s): MTH 3335 .
  
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    PHY 4451 - Advanced Laboratory

    Credits: 4
    An advanced laboratory course in which students conduct experiments similar to those that led to the development of modern physics. Several hours of largely independent laboratory work per week.
    Fulfills: X in LS Core
  
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    PHY 4803 - Special Topics in Physics

    Credits: variable credit
    Reading, lectures, study and research on topics of importance in physics, tailored to the interests of the participating faculty and students. Offered only on demand, subject to instructor availability.
    Prerequisite(s): Instructor consent.
  
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    PHY 4806 - Directed Research

    Credits: variable credit
    Supervised investigation of an experimental or theoretical problem of interest to the student.
    Prerequisite(s): Evidence of sufficient background to undertake the problem of interest, subject to availability of a faculty advisor.

Political Science

  
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    POL 1100 - Politics of the United States

    Credits: 4
    An introduction to the American political system, this course examines (1) the Constitutional basis of American politics, (2) the national institutions that are involved in decision-making and public debate (for example, the Presidency and the bureaucracy, the Federal Courts, the Congress, political parties, the media), (3) issues that Americans argue about (rights and liberties, economic benefits, foreign policy), and the processes by which those arguments are conducted and resolved (campaigns and elections, administrative action, legislation, lobbying, publicity). Required course for all Political Science Majors and Minors.
    Fulfills: SOSC and X in LS Core.
  
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    POL 1300 - Public Administration

    Credits: 4
    This course is an examination of the structures and functions of the federal, state and local governments of the United States. Special attention will be given to the public administration process at the federal level. This course focuses on the role of public bureaucracies in contemporary American government. Over the course of the semester we will consider some general questions of how administrators interact with their political environment and influence the policymaking process. We will examine several specific administrative problems that have become contentious policy issues, such as public health, global warming, immigration, affirmative action, and civil service reform. Special attention will be given to government regulation and stabilization of the economy.
    Fulfills: SOSC in LS Core.
  
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    POL 1400 - Politics of Public Policy

    Credits: 4
    The course provides students with analytical tools, historical contexts and vocabulary to understand current public policy contests. The course examines health care, social welfare, energy, immigration, guns, civil rights, fiscal and environmental policy areas and many more contentious issues. The course facilitates a basic working knowledge of these public policy issues in order to motivate and prepares students to engage in ethical reasoning, policy discussions and deliberations, and political.

     
    Fulfills: SOSC in LS Core.
  
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    POL 1500 - Comparative Politics

    Credits: 4
    This course examines a variety of important issues, such as why are some countries democratic while others are not, what is a state and how did states come about, what is colonialism and how did it shape the present and future of billions of people? The course addresses these questions through an introduction to the study of comparative politics - the art and science of comparing political systems in order to raise and evaluate claims about politics. The substantive material draws on developed and developing parts of the world and covers contemporary as well as recent historical events. Required course for all Political Science Majors and Minors.
    Fulfills: SOSC & D in LS Core.
  
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    POL 1900 - International Politics

    Credits: 4
    Formerly: POL 2510
    This course will assist students in developing a coherent framework for international political analysis. The course will assess the role of states, international organizations, individuals, and corporations in world politics, as well as examine the main theoretic approaches and debates of international relations. This course will also focus on major international issues such as nuclear weapons, terrorism, humanitarian interventions, and cyberspace, as understood through the lens of analytical frameworks and international relations theories.
    Fulfills: SOSC in LS Core.
  
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    POL 2000 - Political Science Methods

    Credits: 4
    This course considers a variety of approaches to political science research, but emphasizes the behavioral and quantitative approaches that are widely utilized in the study of politics.  Students will develop both research skills and learn to understand and appreciate the methodology of the discipline. This course is required for the major or minor and must be taken by majors by the end of sophomore year.  Students are strongly encouraged to take Basic Statistics, prior to taking this course.  
    Prerequisite(s): POL 1100  or POL 1500  , or permission of the instructor.
    Fulfills: SOSC and Q in LS Core
  
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    POL 2010 - Political Ethics

    Credits: 4
    The course will provide a foundation in ethics, ethical theory, and their application to political institutions and the political process. The course will cover the ethical issues and implications faced by politicians, elected officials and government employees in the operation of the government and in making public policy decisions, along with those faced by individuals and entities interacting or doing business with the government. The course will examine how these ethical issues can be resolved in politics and public policy making. Through the use of select case studies, the course will explore current and past ethical issues in politics and public policy making, including torturing of terrorists, NSA spying, whistleblowing, police shootings, illegal immigration and fraud in military and other government contracts.
    Fulfills: E in LS Core.
  
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    POL 2120 - Government, Business and Law

    Credits: 4
    This course examines the relationship between the public and private sector in the United States from a constitutional, historical and contemporary perspective. Public policy issues such as economic and social regulation, antitrust and economic stabilization policy will be examined in detail. Students will research and orally present a case study of a contemporary government-business relationship.
    Fulfills: SOSC in LS Core.
  
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    POL 2122 - Law and Society

    Credits: 4
    An introductory course in the law that examines the theoretical and practical aspects of the law and its impact on individuals and society. The course will cover the history and sources of U.S. law, the difference between substantive, procedural, criminal, and civil law, legal reasoning, the structure and role of the federal and state court systems, the role of the litigation process, and the law of torts, contracts, landlord and tenant, personal property, consumer protection, real estate, agency, employment, and probate. Through the use of selected readings and courts cases, the course will focus on the legal, political, and social implications of these and select legal issues such as discrimination laws, drug testing, privacy laws, copyright laws and video and music downloading.
  
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    POL 2181 - American Political Thought

    Credits: 4
    This course will consider the American vision of government from its roots in the thought of Locke, Calvin and Montesquieu and its institutionalization by Madison, Hamilton, Jefferson and other founders, through its development by Lincoln in the Civil War period and by Roosevelt and Johnson in the New Deal and Great Society eras. The course will concentrate on analyzing the writing of these various thinkers while focusing on themes such as freedom, property, rights, constitutionalism, equality and the role of government.
    Fulfills: SOSC requirement in LS Core.
    Note: This course may be offered as writing intensive and if so, would fulfill the W in LS core.
  
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    POL 2200 - Global Issues

    Credits: 4
    This course is designed to engage and prepare students to analyze contemporary issues impacting global affairs in terms of the major political, social, economic, and environmental forces confronting international communities. We will explore a number of vexing global challenges, such as globalization, terrorism, global security, human rights violations, nationalism and the clash of identities, threat of weapons proliferation, climate change, poverty, international migration, and public health crisis. The focus of this course is on developing students’ ability to understand and evaluate the causes, processes, and consequences of the major issues we will delve into. We will utilize major theories of political science in the analysis of the contemporary global issues discussed.
    Fulfills: SOSC and D requirement in LS Core.
  
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    POL 2300 - The Politics of Food

    Credits: 4
    Formerly: POL1300

    This course explores some of the many ways that what we eat is shaped and controlled by politics. In particular, the course topics center around helping students understand the ways that power dynamics and policy decisions in our political system shape what we eat and why. As a class, students will also seek to understand and evaluate the broader community and even global consequences of the politics of food. Class work and activities will involve approaching questions of food access and choice through other areas of study, such as anthropology, economics, and nutrition.  The course also has a service learning requirement. 
    Fulfills: SOSC & X requirement in LS Core.

  
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    POL 2581 - Intro to Political Theory

    Credits: 4
    What is the best form of government? What does it mean to be treated as a free and equal person? What is the meaning of justice? This course serves as introduction to political theory by surveying answers to these questions, and others, throughout the history of political thought. The course examines thinkers such as Plato, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, J.S.Mill and Rawls.
    Fulfills: H or SOSC in LS Core.
  
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    POL 3111 - Massachusetts State and Local Government

    Credits: 4
    An exploration of state and local government with a focus on Massachusetts state and local politics. The course will explore a variety of areas, including influences outside state and local government at the national and state level, the nature of both state and local governing institutions, and the formulation and creation of public policy at the state level, with particular focus on specific public policy areas.  
    Fulfills: SOSC in LS Core
  
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    POL 3112 - Congress and The Legislative Process

    Credits: 4
    A study of the lawmaking body in the United States Government, this course will consider the powers of the legislature, representation, membership and elections, the committee system, and the effect of inter and intra government forces on the policymaking process. The course will also focus on the legislative process with students participating in a legislative simulation.
    Fulfills: SOSC in LS Core.
  
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    POL 3113 - The American Presidency

    Credits: 4
    This course will examine the constraints which limit presidents, the opportunities that presidents can seize, and the virtues which maximize their prospects for success. The objective of this course is to broaden your understanding of how this uniquely personalized institution developed, its constitutional authority, its relationship with other branches of government and how one gets selected for this office. Finally we will assess its current strengths and weaknesses and discuss the perception and reality of presidential power and leadership.
    Fulfills: SOSC in LS Core.
  
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    POL 3122 - Issues in Public Policy

    Credits: 4
    This course examines selected contemporary issues in public policy at the national level of politics in the United States. Examples of policy areas include, but are not limited to, national security, economic stabilization, immigration, and global warming. 
    Fulfills: SOSC and X in LS Core.
  
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    POL 3130 - Campaigns and Elections

    Credits: 4
    The course will focus on the process by which American choose elected officials. Topics such as voting behavior, fundraising, the role of the media in campaigning and campaign ethics will be discussed.
    Fulfills: SOSC and X in LS Core.
  
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    POL 3140 - Mass Media and American Politics

    Credits: 4
    This course examines the role of the media in shaping political opinions and behavior. The role of the media in setting political agendas and reporting and interpreting political events will be examined. The nature and influence of public opinion in a democratic society will be studied.
    Prerequisite(s): POL 1100  or POL 1500 , or permission of the instructor. 
    Cross-Listed: COM4132
    Fulfills: SOSC in LS Core.
  
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    POL 3141 - Political Communication

    Credits: 4
    This course examines the role of political communication in the United States. The course will cover such topics as political advertising, campaign consulting and management and policymaking, polling, speech writing, negotiation, mediation and alternative dispute resolution. Students will write and present a political lobbying project on a contemporary political issue.
    Prerequisite(s): POL 1100  or POL 1500 , or permission of the instructor. 
    Fulfills: SOSC requirement in LS Core.
  
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    POL 3150 - Criminal Law

    Credits: 4
    This course is a survey of criminal law, including sources, classification, definitions, elements, defenses, and culpability. Specific topics include: homicide, assault and battery, domestic violence and protective orders, rape and sex offenses, theft crimes, criminal conspiracies, narcotics and alcohol offenses, white collar crimes, illegal firearms, Internet related crimes, the juvenile justice system, the role and impact of plea bargaining in the criminal justice system, victim’s rights, and punishment and sentencing. The course will also underscore the procedures associated with the judicial process, including criminal procedure and court jurisdiction on federal and state levels.
    Fulfills: SOSC and X requirement in LS Core.
  
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    POL 3151 - American Constitutional Law

    Credits: 4
    A study of the United States Supreme Court in the American political system viewed historically and through analysis of leading cases from the court’s inception to the present.
    Fulfills: SOSC in LS Core.
  
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    POL 3152 - Civil Liberties and Civil Rights

    Credits: 4
    A study of the way in which the American political system defines and defends the civil liberties and civil rights of individuals and groups.
    Fulfills: SOSC and D in LS Core.
  
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    POL 3153 - Politics and Religion

    Credits: 4


    This course evaluates the influence of religion on politics through a blend of empirical, historical, normative, and legal approaches. The course will consider topics such as: the proper role of religion in public life; the role of religion in the American founding; the relationship between free exercise and establishment in American and international law; the balance between secularism, religion, and free speech; the relationship between religious belief and political behavior; the role of religious doctrine in public justification; the effect of religion on foreign policy; the political institutions of religious and non-religious nations; the correlation between religion and conflict; just war theory; the historical development of church/state relations. The course will both engage with the theoretical work from ancient and contemporary thinkers and be informed by empirical research. We will pay special attention to the intersection of normative theory and empirical inquiry.

     

  
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    POL 3160 - United States Foreign Policy

    Credits: 4
    This course examines the ways in which American foreign policy is formulated and executed, with special attention to historical experience, established traditions, and recurrent policy debates over the proper role of the United States in the world, particularly in the face of global challenges.
    Fulfills: SOSC in LS Core.
  
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    POL 3161 - Politics of Immigration and Human Movement

    Credits: 4
    This course studies the movement of human populations through the lens of Political Science. Political Science is focused on the allocation and use of power and distribution of resources. Human population movements are clearly affected by the use of this power and access to resources. This course is structured to study those population flows, the “pushes” and “pulls” of migration, the effects of human migration on both the home and the host countries, and the academic theories that seek to explain policies on human migration and its effects (economic, cultural, political, religious, etc.), particularly in the United States.  Students will learn about, assess, and critique the history and development of the U.S. immigration policy and contemporary immigration issues.
    Fulfills: SOSC and D in LS Core.
    Note: This course may be offered as writing intensive and if so, would fulfill the W in LS Core.
 

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