Oct 18, 2019  
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Mechanical Engineering

  
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    MEN 5030 - Energy Systems

    Credits: 4
    This course provides an introduction to global energy concerns, fossil and nuclear fuels, energy consumption analysis, energy management and conservation techniques, renewable and alternative energy sources. In addition, the course covers traditional Rankin cycles from traditional power plants multi-stage absorption cycles and vapor compression cycles with pure and mixed working fluids.
    Prerequisite(s): MEN 3032 .
  
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    MEN 5040 - Advanced Fluid Mechanics

    Credits: 4
    This course covers the compressible flow including shock waves, boundary layers, separation, drag, and lift. Course also covers inviscid, irrotational flow, and boundary layer theory. Analytical and numerical solutions for flow over plates are discussed.
    Prerequisite(s): GEN 3040 .
  
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    MEN 5050 - Manufacturing Processes

    Credits: 4
    An introduction to manufacturing processes for metals, polymers and reinforced plastics. Processes discussed include metal-casting, heat treatments, processing of powders, material removal processes, injection molding and rapid prototyping. Attention will also be given to material selection, product design, cost analysis and quality control.
    Prerequisite(s): MEN 3020 .
  
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    MEN 5060 - Advanced Materials

    Credits: 4
    An advanced course on the constitutive behavior of active materials including piezoelectric ceramics, magnetostrictive materials, and shape memory alloys. Governing equations for the thermodynamics of electromechanical interactions, constitutive relations, and strain displacement relations will be developed. Students will propose and complete a research project that extends the course material.
    Prerequisite(s): MEN 3020  and MEN 3032 .

Management

  
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    MGT 3308 - Quality Management

    Credits: 4
    This course provides an overview of the importance of quality in a rapidly changing business environment. Quality management principles, methods and tools will be introduced and requirements for successful implementation of a quality management program will be identified.
    Prerequisite(s): BUS 2220 .
  
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    MGT 3310 - Organizational Behavior

    Credits: 4
    This course builds on the knowledge and skills developed through the Business Enterprise core courses. The course will focus on individual and group level organizational behavior within domestic and international contexts, with specific emphasis on leadership, power, communication, negotiation, organizational change and self-managed team processes. This course is designed to deepen students’ understanding of behavioral theories and provide them with opportunities to apply that learning to inter-personal, group and organizational problems. This is an experiential course and it is recommended for students planning to apply to graduate school in business or related areas.
    Prerequisite(s): BUS 1100  and at least Sophomore standing.
    Fulfills: X in LS Core
  
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    MGT 3320 - Employment Law and Labor Relations

    Credits: 4
    This course will introduce the student to the historical and cultural development of the legal, ethical and regulatory environment of modern business as it relates to the employment relationship. Topics will include common law rules governing the relationships of employer-employee, principal-agent and employer-independent contractor. An examination of important statutory rules shall include the Occupational Safety and Health Act, National Labor Relations Act and Title VII of the Civil Rights Act together with its progeny the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act and the Equal Pay Act.
    Prerequisite(s): BUS 1100  and at least Sophomore standing
  
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    MGT 3325 - Ethics and Social Responsibility

    Credits: 4
    Ethics and Social Responsibility provides students with opportunities to examine the meaning of business ethics and the social responsibility of business in light of the numerous high profile challenges that managers face in the current business environment. Varying ethical approaches will be applied to ethical leadership and the management of conflicting values confronting business leaders on a daily basis. The more global issue of balancing principles of good business with principles of ethical behavior in various cultures will be discussed. Students will participate in a significant service-learning project in this course.
    Prerequisite(s): BUS 1100  and at least Sophomore standing.
    Fulfills: E and X in LS Core
  
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    MGT 3330 - Legal Environment of Business

    Credits: 4
    This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the general framework of the legal environment in which twenty-first century business is expected to operate. The primary objective is to acquaint students with the many practical legal issues they should be cognizant of and are likely to encounter throughout their business careers. Class discussion will emphasize current court case decisions of the state and federal appellate courts and United States Supreme Court as appropriate. Students will appreciate how the law is integrated into the development of strategic business decisions. Primary course topics will be drawn from the following business law categories: (1) Government Regulation of Business and the Court System; (2) The Law of Contracts, Sales and an Introduction to the Uniform Commercial Code (UCC); (3) The Law of Torts; Negligence, Strict Liability and Product Liability with some applications to Professional Responsibility; (4) The Law of Agency and Employment , and (5) Methods of Business Formation Including Proprietorships, Partnerships, Corporations and Special Business Forms.
    Prerequisite(s): BUS 1100  and at least Sophomore standing
  
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    MGT 3350 - Sustainable Business Practices

    Credits: 4
    The course provides students with an integrative approach to learning the theory and application of sustainable business practices. Students will gain awareness of current issues in business with regard to sustainable management. Students will learn various technical, organizational and operational aspects of sustainable business practices through active learning opportunities, case discussions, technical applications and external activities.
    Prerequisite(s): BUS 1100  and at least Sophomore standing
    Cross-Listed: ESS 3350 
  
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    MGT 3351 - Human Resource Management

    Credits: 4
    This is a broad survey course providing a comprehensive overview of several human resource functions, including recruitment and selection, compensation, training, performance evaluation, labor and employee relations. Students will consider HRM topics as they relate to all employees with different roles and perspectives for supervisors and subordinates, and how these topics apply to creating strategic directions for an organization. Using an applied setting focus, instruction methods combine interactive lectures, experiential exercises, current events, case review, and external project analysis and presentation.
    Prerequisite(s): BUS 1100 .
    Fulfills: X in LS Core
  
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    MGT 3355 - Diversity in the Workplace

    Credits: 4
    This course, which may include a service e learning component, explores the workplace dynamics related to people’s similarities and differences in characteristics such as race, ethnicity, gender, age, sexual orientation, gender identity, religion, and physical and mental ability. Topics include perception and attribution, the social construction of identity, privilege, power relations, discrimination, prejudice, stereotypes, and approaches businesses and other organizations take to address issues of workplace diversity.
    Prerequisite(s): BUS 1100  and at least Sophomore standing. 
    Fulfills: D in LS Core
    Note: This course will fulfill a required elective for the following concentration(s):

  
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    MGT 3357 - International Management

    Credits: 4
    This course focuses on the basic elements that one must understand when doing business across borders. The primary purpose of the course is to create awareness of and sensitivity to the decisions confronting the multinational business in order to prepare individuals to support companies’ moves from domestic to foreign environments. Students analyze the various external forces faced by geocentric leaders/managers. They examine operational issues and develop business strategies necessary for success in the global race for profitable growth. Lectures, class discussions, and case analyses help students to explore management and economic issues critical to the success of a geocentric employee/manager.
    Prerequisite(s): BUS 1100  and at least Sophomore standing
  
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    MGT 3360 - Advanced Human Resource Management

    Credits: 4
    This course is designed to provide an advanced level of knowledge in the study of human resource management. Students will integrate the knowledge gained through previous coursework and experience and build on that conceptual foundation through class discussions, real-life case study, debates, and practical application. Covered topics include: training and development, needs assessment, learning and transfer of training, training program design, training evaluation, employee compensation, employee benefits, employer-sponsored retirement plans, employer-sponsored health insurance programs, disability insurance, life insurance, and workers compensation, corporate & social responsibility, trends in human resource management, and expanding the domains of human resource competencies.
    Prerequisite(s): MGT3351
  
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    MGT 3370 - International Entrepreneurship

    Credits: 4
    This course introduces students to the opportunities and challenges of entrepreneurship and innovation from an international perspective. It focuses on what every entrepreneur or innovator needs to understand about today’s hypercompetitive global market. Students learn how to design a business to compete effectively in an international context and apply that learning to create new international ventures or social enterprises which they can enact in the future. 
    Prerequisite(s): BUS1100
  
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    MGT 4800 - Directed Study

    Credits: 4
    An independent study course for superior senior business students under the direction of a faculty member. The student must identify his/her intention to apply for this course in the semester prior to actual enrollment. Must be approved by both the directed study faculty member and the Management Department Chair.This cannot be used to replace required management electives unless department approval. 
  
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    MGT 4900 - Special Topics in Management

    Credits: 4
    This course is designed to explore contemporary issues in Management. The specific topic varies each time the course is taught. Descriptions are available in the Lucey Center for Business Advising. 
    Prerequisite(s): BUS1100
    Note: Depending on the topic, this course may fulfill a required elective for the following concentration(s):


Marketing

  
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    MKT 3300 - Marketing Strategy

    Credits: 4
    This is the first course marketing concentrates take after the Principles of Marketing course. This course will include in-depth study and practical applications of key marketing concepts (i.e., marketing objectives, segmentation, targeting, positioning, customer lifetime value, competitive advantage, value proposition, product life cycle, and branding). Students will integrate their marketing knowledge with information about the environment to develop successful marketing strategies. Students tackle challenging marketing situations and cases, analyze data and information, engage in research, and develop recommendations. Students also present, write, and critique during the semester and work on developing these skills.
    Prerequisite(s): BUS 2205 .
  
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    MKT 3303 - Advertising and Promotion

    Credits: 4
    The basic principles of advertising, direct marketing, sales promotion, public relations, publicity and personal selling and other forms of promotion are studied. The course will examine the factors affecting promotional decisions as well as the development of effective marketing communication strategies. Topics include establishment of objectives, identifying target audiences, budgeting, formulation, design and testing of message, media selection and analysis of effectiveness in the context of an integrated marketing plan and ethical considerations. Students will have an opportunity to apply their analytical and creative skills by developing actual TV, radio and print ads as well as write press releases using real world, practical and contemporary communication case studies.
    Prerequisite(s): BUS 2205 .
  
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    MKT 3309 - Sales Management and Business Marketing

    Credits: 4
    The course provides the student with broad exposures to all aspects of sales management including both formulation and implementation of the sales program. It addresses the broader issues of identifying the role of personal selling in the marketing mix as well as the more specific issues such as identifying customer needs and satisfying those needs through the sales of a product or service, including online sales. Emphasis is on the management of a sales force and the decision-making process relevant to the marketing of a product or service.
    Prerequisite(s): BUS 2205 .
  
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    MKT 3315 - Entrepreneurship

    Credits: 4
    The purpose of the course is to discover and understand the factors that govern the success (or failure) of entrepreneurial ventures and careers. A variety of different perspectives are introduced for learning about the creation and evolution of entrepreneurial ventures in different environments. The course will emphasize special strategic and operating issues faced by entrepreneurs that include family, management, and ethical decision matters.
    Prerequisite(s): BUS 2205 .
    Note: This course will fulfill a required elective for the following concentration(s):

  
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    MKT 3316 - Marketing of Services

    Credits: 4
    The course examines the marketing methods and techniques used in the services sector, including professional services, health care, education, travel, financial and sports. Through readings and case study, the marketing accepts of the growing service industry are explored. Both non-profit and profit oriented organizations are examined. 
    Prerequisite(s): BUS 2205  
    Note: This course will fulfill a required elective for the following concentration(s):

  
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    MKT 3318 - Retail Management

    Credits: 4
    This course explores the changing character of the retail trade. It examines consumer buying behavior, store location techniques, buying and merchandising policies, pricing policies, and promotional activities of all types of retailers. Learning methods will include case studies, comprehensive research projects, extensive class discussions and site visits to malls and local retailers.
    Prerequisite(s): BUS 2205 .
  
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    MKT 3320 - Global Marketing

    Credits: 4
    The course provides the student with exposure to global issues and concepts that are relevant to businesses. Topics include the dynamic and uncontrollable environment of global markets, assessing global market opportunities, and developing and implementing global marketing strategies. Students will have the opportunity to apply their research and analytical skills in the development of a marketing plan for a global product.
    Prerequisite(s): BUS 2205 .
    Fulfills: X in LS Core
  
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    MKT 3355 - Consumer Behavior

    Credits: 4
    Marketers base their plans on assumptions about consumer behavior. This course will introduce consumer behavior concepts, theories, models, and research studies to help us understand consumers - why they buy and how they make decisions. We will learn how consumers make choices and judgments, form relationships with brands, perceive and learn information, are impacted by friends and others, form and change attitudes, are motivated to act, and are influenced by a variety of internal ( i.e. individual) and external (e.g. social) factors. Understanding consumer behavior helps companies compete more effectively, design better products for consumers, and ultimately grow their businesses.
    Prerequisite(s): BUS 2205 .
  
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    MKT 4420 - Marketing Research

    Credits: 4
    Marketing Research plays an important role in providing timely and objective information to marketing decision makers. The primary objectives of this course are to introduce students to the research process and to some of the basic tools and techniques used in marketing research. Students will develop practical knowledge in identifying marketing problem areas, formulating research designs, selecting sources of data, constructing questionnaires, sampling methods, processing quantitative analysis, and reporting information by completing an Institutional Research Board approved marketing research project.
    Prerequisite(s): BUS 2213  or MTH1110 or MTH1111 and MKT 3300  
    Fulfills: X in LS Core
  
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    MKT 4800 - Directed Study

    Credits: 4
    An independent study course for superior senior students under the direction of a faculty member. Approval must be obtained from the chair and the faculty member involved. This cannot be used to replace required Marketing electives unless department approval. 
  
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    MKT 4900 - Special Topics in Marketing

    Credits: 4
    This course is designed to explore contemporary issues in Marketing. The specific topic varies each time the course is taught. Descriptions are available in the Lucey Center for Business Advising. 
    Prerequisite(s): BUS 2205  
  
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    MKT 4980 - Marketing Seminar

    Credits: 4
    A capstone required course that integrates the total marketing effort by use of an experiential learning exercise in which students practice the design, implementation and control of global business strategies. Students participate in a sophisticated business simulation that is designed to capture the qualitative and quantitative dimensions of business decision-making within the context of an international business enterprise. Students essentially run an international start-up business for the semester. The problems and opportunities encountered require total immersion into the business enterprise as well as international relationships and economic trends. The course enables the student to apply what has been learned in other business courses. Seminar meets once a week.
    Prerequisite(s): MKT 4420  
    Fulfills: X in LS Core

Mathematics

  
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    MTH 1000 - Concepts in Algebra

    Credits: 4
    A one semester course designed to develop fundamental algebraic and problem-solving concepts and skills. Topics include linear, quadratic, square root, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions and equations. This course utilizes individual investigation, group problem-solving, and writing in order to enhance students’ understanding of algebraic models and the problem-solving process. A graphing calculator is required. We recommend a TI-84+. This course is open only to students whose Placement Exam results indicate that they need further preparation for subsequent mathematics courses. Six hours per week.
    Fulfills: Q in LS Core
  
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    MTH 1001 - Mathematical Foundations for Business I

    Credits: 4
    This is the first course in a two-course sequence designed for business majors, to develop algebraic and quantitative problem-solving skills. The course will provide a basis of algebra skills and other tools required to navigate the mathematics encountered regularly in the world of business. Students will use the tools developed in this course to solve applied problems selected from their field. Graphing calculator is required. We recommend TI-84+. This course is not open to students who have credit for any math course numbered MTH 1003  or higher.
    When Offered: Fall semester.
  
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    MTH 1002 - Mathematical Foundations for Business II

    Credits: 4
    This is the second course in a two-course sequence designed for business majors, to develop algebraic skills along with critical thinking and problem solving related to business applications. Students will develop the skills and tools necessary to navigate the mathematics encountered in their business curriculum. The focus of MTH 1002 is exponential and logarithmic functions, annuities, and concepts of probability to solve applied problems selected primarily from the field of business. Graphing calculator is required. We recommend TI-84+. This course is not open to students who have credit for any math course numbered MTH 1003 or higher.
    Prerequisite(s): MTH 1001.
    Fulfills: Q in LS Core.
    When Offered: Spring semester.
  
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    MTH 1003 - Introductory Mathematics for Business

    Credits: 4
    A one-semester course designed to develop algebraic and quantitative problem-solving skills. Students will use algebraic, exponential, and logarithmic functions as well as fundamental concepts of probability to solve applied problems selected primarily from the field of business. Graphing calculator is required. We recommend TI-84+. This course is not open to students who have credit for MTH 1016 or any math course numbered MTH 1115 or higher.
    Fulfills: Q in LS Core
  
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    MTH 1016 - Precalculus

    Credits: 4
    This course develops students’ mathematical problem-solving skills and prepares students for courses in calculus and science. Emphasis is on the creation and use of functions and graphs to explain the relationship between quantities in applied problems. Types of functions investigated include linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric, and their inverses. Graphing calculator is required. We recommend TI-84+. This course is not open to students who have credit for any math course numbered MTH 1115 or higher.
    Fulfills: Q in LS Core
  
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    MTH 1110 - Basic Statistics with Fantasy Football

    Credits: 4
    The course covers the same topics as the standard course MTH 1111  Basic Statistics: basic methods of statistical inference including the organization and analysis of data, sampling theory, point and interval estimation, hypothesis testing, correlation and regression analysis, and analysis of variance. What differentiates this course from MTH 1111  is that students in this course will use statistical tools to analyze football statistics and strategically play fantasy football as co-owners of franchises. Statistical software used througout this course. Graphing calculator is required. We recommend TI-84+. MTH 1110 is not open to students with credit for MTH 1111 , MTH 2527 , MTH 1505 , or BUS 2213 .
    Fulfills: Q and STEM in LS Core.
    When Offered: Fall semester.
  
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    MTH 1111 - Basic Statistics

    Credits: 4
    Basic methods of statistical inference including the organization and analysis of data, sampling theory, point and interval estimation, hypothesis testing, correlation and regression analysis, and analysis of variance. Statistical software will be used throughout this course. MTH 1111 is not open to students with credit for MTH 1110 , MTH 2527 , MTH 1505 , or BUS 2213 .
    Fulfills: Q and STEM in LS Core.
  
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    MTH 1112 - Adventures in Mathematics

    Credits: 4
    An exploration of modern topics and modes of thinking in mathematics for students not planning to specialize in math or science. Topics may include numbers and counting, dealing with infinity, the Golden Rectangle, the fourth dimension, rubber sheet geometry, knots, fractals, and chaos.
    Fulfills: STEM in LS Core.
  
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    MTH 1115 - Calculus and Quantitative Methods for Business

    Credits: 4
    A one-semester course in algebra, probability, and differential and integral calculus of algebraic, exponential, and logarithmic functions. At the end of the course, the student should understand the mechanics of all these mathematical techniques and appreciate their use in business applications. These skills should prepare the student for further study in quantitative courses in business, statistics, and economics. Graphing calculator is required. We recommend TI-84+.
    Prerequisite(s): MTH 1003  or exemption from MTH 1003  through the Mathematics Placement Exam.
    Fulfills: Q and STEM in LS Core.
  
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    MTH 1217 - Calculus I

    Credits: 4
    A first course in calculus for functions of a single variable. Limits, derivatives, and integrals of algebraic, trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions, and applications of differentiation, including related rates, optimization, and the evaluation of indeterminate forms will be covered. Graphing calculator is required. We recommend TI-84+.
    Prerequisite(s): MTH 1016  or exemption from MTH 1016  through the Mathematics Placement Exam.
    Fulfills: Q and STEM in LS Core.
  
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    MTH 1218 - Calculus II

    Credits: 4
    A continuation of MTH 1217  for functions of a single variable. Includes techniques and applications of integration, sequences, and series, including Taylor series. Graphing calculator is required. We recommend TI-84+.
    Prerequisite(s): MTH 1217 .
    Fulfills: Q and STEM in LS Core.
  
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    MTH 1314 - Discrete Mathematics

    Credits: 4
    An introduction to mathematics for first-year math majors exposing the student to a breadth of topics in the discipline while developing skills in written and oral communication of mathematical ideas, problem solving, and theorem proving. Topics include an introduction to number theory, logic, proofs, graph theory, combinatorics, and discrete probability.
    Prerequisite(s): A minimum score of 28 on the Mathematics Placement Exam or MTH 1016 .
    Fulfills: Q and STEM in LS Core.
  
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    MTH 1412 - Foundations of Mathematics II

    Credits: 4
    This course is designed for prospective elementary teachers and has two over-arching themes: (1) to investigate why mathematical operations and procedures work as they do in algebra, geometry, and probability and, in the process, to develop proficiency and an appreciation of the value of mathematics: and (2) to develop an ability to explain one’s reasoning clearly in written and spoken language. Individual and group problem-solving activities, pattern exploration, and model construction will provide students with a variety of opportunities to build their own deep understanding of foundational mathematical concepts and procedures. The topics to be covered are algebraic modeling; plane, solid, and spherical geometry; measurement; and probability and statistics.
    Prerequisite(s): MTE 1410 and MTE 1411.
    Fulfills: Q, STEM, and X in LS Core.
  
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    MTH 1505 - Applied Statistics and Probability for Engineers

    Credits: 4
    An introduction to applied statistical and probability methods in engineering dealing with discrete and continuous variables, estimation, tests of hypotheses, regression, and control charts. Statistical computer packages will be used in connection with some of the material studied.
    Prerequisite(s): MTH 1217 .
    Fulfills: Q in LS Core.
    When Offered: Spring semester.
  
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    MTH 2219 - Calculus III

    Credits: 4
    Functions in parametric form and the calculus of these functions, including polar, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates. Vectors in two and three dimensional space and the calculus of vector-valued functions. Lines, planes, and surfaces in three dimensional space. The calculus of functions of several variables: limits, partial and directional derivatives, gradient, tangent planes and normal lines, relative maxima and minima, double and triple integrals in rectangular and polar form. Graphing calculator is required. We recommend TI-84+. Computer algebra software may also be required.
    Prerequisite(s): MTH 1218 .
  
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    MTH 2220 - Differential Equations

    Credits: 4
    An introduction to ordinary differential equations and their use in science and engineering. Topics include first order separable, linear, homogeneous, and exact equations; higher order linear equations and first order linear systems; elementary numerical methods; and an introduction to planar dynamical systems and their local phase portraits at critical points. An emphasis is placed on linear equations and systems and their solution using techniques such as eigenvalues, variation of parameters, Laplace transform, and power series. Graphing calculator is required. We recommend TI-84+.
    Prerequisite(s): MTH 2219  or consent of the instructor.
  
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    MTH 2423 - Topics in Geometry

    Credits: 4
    Selected topics from Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries. Emphasis is placed on exploring different types of geometry and the writing of proofs.
    Prerequisite(s): MTH 1314  and MTH 1218  or consent of the instructor.
    When Offered: Fall semester of even-numbered years.
  
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    MTH 2527 - Probability and Statistics I

    Credits: 4
    A calculus-based treatment of probability and statistics for situations involving one random variable or population. Calculating probabilities using counting techniques, set theory, discrete and continuous random variables. Descriptive statistics, central limit theorem, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing for mean and proportion. Simple linear regression and chi-square test. Statistical software used throughout this course.
    Prerequisite(s): MTH 1218 .
    Fulfills: Q in LS Core
    When Offered: Fall semester.
  
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    MTH 2528 - Probability and Statistics II

    Credits: 4
    A calculus-based treatment of probability and statistics for situations involving two random variables or populations. Joint probability distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis tests, analysis of variance, and nonparametric statistics. Statistical software used throughout this course.
    Prerequisite(s): MTH 2219  and MTH 2527 .
    When Offered: Spring semester.
  
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    MTH 2644 - Combinatorics and Graph Theory

    Credits: 4
    An introduction to the basic techniques and modes of reasoning for combinatorial problem solving. Emphasis on the three principal aspects of combinatorial reasoning: the systematic analysis of different possibilities, the exploration of the logical structure of a problem, and ingenuity. Topics include the basic properties of graphs, isomorphisms, planarity, Hamilton and Euler cycles, and graph coloring in graph theory and the basic counting rules, generating functions, recurrence relations, and inclusion-exclusion in enumeration.
    Prerequisite(s): MTH 1314  and MTH 1218 .
  
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    MTH 2650 - Knot Theory

    Credits: 4
    An introduction to the mathematical theory of knots, with emphasis on knot invariants, including tricolorability, unknotting number, bridge number, genus, and knot polynomials. Applications to other areas of mathematics as well as to biology, chemistry, and physics will also be explored.
    Prerequisite(s): MTH 1314  and MTH 1218 .
  
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    MTH 3335 - Linear Algebra

    Credits: 4
    An introduction to linear algebra and its applications. This course will cover systems of linear equations, matrices, determinants, vector spaces and change of basis, inner product spaces and orthogonality, linear transformations, and eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Graphing calculator and mathematical software technology will be used to illustrate computational and numerical issues.
    Prerequisite(s): MTH 1218 .
    When Offered: Fall semester.
  
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    MTH 3400(W) - Readings in Mathematics

    Credits: 4
    A course in readings in mathematical literature and in mathematical writing. Selected topics will be investigated within their historical and cultural context. Recent developments in the mathematical sciences will also be explored. Each student will be responsible for reading selected articles, writing several papers, and researching a topic for final presentation.
    Prerequisite(s): MTH 1314  and MTH 1218 .
    Fulfills: W in LS Core
    When Offered: Fall semester of odd-numbered years.
  
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    MTH 3701 - Modeling and Simulation

    Credits: 4
    Introduction to modeling and computer simulation. Examples will be drawn from numerous areas in the physical, biological, and social sciences, and business. Probabilistic as well as deterministic models will be considered.
    Prerequisite(s): MTH 2220 , and CSC 1610  or CSC 1611, or consent of the instructor.
  
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    MTH 3725 - Numerical Analysis

    Credits: 4
    Theory and application of selected topics from Numerical Analysis. Topics include: solutions of equations and systems of equations, interpolation, numerical differentiation and integration, and numerical solution of differential equations. Error bounds are treated. Emphasis given to methods that can be implemented on a computer. If time allows, other topics may be added such as Least Squares and Eigenvalues.
    Prerequisite(s): MTH 1218 , and CSC 1610  or CSC 1611, or consent of the instructor.
  
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    MTH 4336 - Abstract Algebra

    Credits: 4
    This course is an introduction to the theory of groups, rings, and fields. Emphasis will be on abstract theorems, proofs, and rigorous mathematical reasoning.
    Prerequisite(s): MTH 1314  and MTH 3335  or consent of the instructor.
    When Offered: Spring semester.
  
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    MTH 4343 - Real Analysis

    Credits: 4
    This course is an introduction, with emphasis on theory, to the foundations of the calculus of real valued functions of real variables. Topic will include uniform continuity, compactness, uniform convergence, differentiation, and integration.
    Prerequisite(s): MTH 1314  and MTH 2219  or consent of the instructor.
    When Offered: Fall semesters.
  
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    MTH 4600 - Topics in Mathematics

    Credits: 4
    Reading, lectures, study, and/or research in a branch of advanced mathematics in which a course is not regularly offered.
    Prerequisite(s): permission of the instructor.
    Note: May be taken more than once.
  
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    MTH 4645 - Complex Analysis

    Credits: 4
    An introduction to the calculus of functions of a complex variable for students of science, engineering, and mathematics. Topics include complex differentiation, harmonic functions, the Cauchy-Riemann equations, contour integrals, the Cauchy integral theorem and Cauchy integral formula, Taylor and Laurent series, the residue theorem, and conformal mapping.
    Prerequisite(s): MTH 2219 .
  
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    MTH 4800 - Directed Study

    Credits: 4
    In lieu of a formal course, qualified upper-class students may propose an intensive program of reading under the direction of a member of the department. A student wishing to elect this course will be required to submit a proposal to the department and receive departmental approval prior to registration.
    Note: May be taken more than once.
  
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    MTH 4850 - Directed Research

    Credits: 4
    In lieu of a formal course, qualified upper-class students may propose an intensive program of undergraduate research under the direction of a member of the department. This will involve reading articles from mathematical journals and conducting research on open problems in mathematics, culminating in a presentation and/or thesis paper. A student wishing to elect this course will be required to submit a proposal to the department and receive departmental approval prior to registration.
    Fulfills: X in LS Core
    Note: May be taken more than once.

Mathematics Education

  
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    MTE 1410 - Foundations of Mathematics I

    Credits: 4
    This course is the first of a three-part sequence designed to help prospective elementary school teachers develop a deep understanding of the underlying structure of mathematics. Topics will include: (1) exploration of the meaning number and the historical significance of place-value systems; (2) development of the standard arithmetic algorithms with analogies to algebra and geometry; (3) investigation of divisibility and many other aspects of elementary number theory; (4) proper communication of mathematical ideas using accurate terminology; (5) examination of the meaning and notations of the rational number system. The ideas of deductive justification and its importance, historical perspectives, and connections within mathematics and between math and other areas will play a large role throughout the course. Students are required to pass all three courses in this sequence prior to enrolling in EDU 3334 Teaching Mathematics.
    Fulfills: Q in LS Core

O’Brien Center

  
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    OBR 1000INT - Independent Internship

    Credits: 0
    Independent internship opportunities are available to students in a wide variety of fields and work settings. Students may register for an independent internship in the fall, spring or summer semester. Interested students should contact their career advisor in the O’Brien Center for more information or to discuss opportunities.
    Prerequisite(s): (1) Must have completed a minimum of 30 credit hours to participate, (2) Must have a 2.0 minimum GPA, (3) Must complete a minimum of 100 hours during the semester, (4) Must register the independent internship with the O’Brien Center using Advantage, (5) Student and site supervisor must set learning goals for the independent internship experience, (6) Student and site supervisor must complete a post internship reflection of the experience. Student must have approval through the O’Brien Center with oversight from the O’Brien Center Faculty Advisory Board.
    Fulfills: X in LS Core.

Philosophy

  
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    PHL 1000 - Introduction to Philosophy

    Credits: 4
    A first course in philosophy focusing on classic questions that have stirred the perennial human quest for wisdom. We will explore such questions as: Are humans free or determined? How do the mind and body interact? Is ethics just relative to each person or society? Should there be any limits to the political freedom of citizens? Does God exist? The course will introduce students to the methods and culture of philosophy: sympathetic understanding, critical analysis, fair argumentation, and a persistent desire to know the truth whatever it is. The focus and questions covered will be determined by each instructor.
    Fulfills: PHL in LS Core
  
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    PHL 2020(W) - Perspectives on the Good Life

    Credits: 4
    Before it comes to an end, how shall I spend the life I have? What would make that life genuinely worth living? We will seek the guidance of many masters: East and West, ancient and modern, women and men and from diverse races. We have much to consider, but the main challenge for each of us is to shape a perspective we can each embrace as our own. What could be more important?
    Prerequisite(s): PHL 1000 .
    Fulfills: E and W in LS Core
  
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    PHL 2030 - Contemporary Moral Problems

    Credits: 4
    The course consists of three logically distinct parts: (1) Meta-ethical questions such as: “In what sense is Ethics a science?” “Can moral judgments be true or false?” “Is morality objective or subjective?”; (2) ethical theories such as Utilitarianism, Deontology, and Natural Law Theory, and (3) application of the ethical principles to several major problem areas in human life.
    Prerequisite(s): PHL 1000 .
    Fulfills: E in LS Core
  
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    PHL 2040 - Introduction to Political Philosophy

    Credits: 4
    A critical examination of some of the basic issues in political philosophy: the purpose and justification of government, the legitimate extent of government authority over the individual, a citizen’s obligation to obey the law, and the nature of rights and justice.
    Prerequisite(s): PHL 1000 .
    Fulfills: E in LS Core
  
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    PHL 2050 - Ethics in the Professions

    Credits: 4
    The course is designed to introduce students to the three major ethical theories: Natural Law, Deontology, and Utilitarianism. After the students have been familiarized with the fundamental principles and with the logical structure of moral reasoning, we will examine some of the many moral problems that arise in the professional lives of doctors, lawyers, engineers, advertisers, etc. Topics will include privacy, confidentiality, deception, commutative and distributive justice in hiring and compensation, etc. The course will stress case studies in the form of group discussions and presentations of cases in class by students.
    Prerequisite(s): PHL 1000 .
    Fulfills: E in LS Core
  
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    PHL 2060 - Biomedical Ethics

    Credits: 4
    A critical examination of moral issues in medicine and bioethics. Topics will be selected from among the following: the physician relationship; informed consent; research ethics; issues at the end of life including euthanasia and physician assisted suicide; the allocation of scarce medical resources; race and gender in medicine; reproductive and genetic control, etc. Ethical theories and principles will be introduced to help analyze the chosen issues.
    Prerequisite(s): PHL 1000 .
    Fulfills: E in LS Core
  
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    PHL 2070 - Environmental Ethics

    Credits: 4
    Environmental Ethics concerns humanity’s relationship with nature. In addition to questions about our moral obligations to other humans, animals, plants, ecosystems, and future generations, the course will also look at recent work on the Land Ethic,Ecofascism, Deep Ecology, Global Ecocentrism, Ecofeminism, Social Ecology, and Sustainability. We will begin with a brief look at some background texts before turning to philosophical analysis of such contemporary issues as climate change, renewable energy, pollution, and sustainability.
    Prerequisite(s): PHL1000.
    Fulfills: E in LS Core
  
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    PHL 2080 - Approaches to Ethics

    Credits: 4
    The course presents the positions and examines the arguments of several of the dominant ways of approaching ethical issues and questions. Although specific determinations are made by the individual instructor, the course survey generally includes the following particular approaches to ethics: Divine Command Theory (Euthyphro, Augustine), Virtue Ethics (Aristotle, MacIntyre), Epicureanism and Stoicism (Epicurus, Epictetus), Natural Law Theory (Aquinas, Hobbes), Moral Sense Theory (Hume, James Q. Wilson), Deontology (Kant), Utilitarianism (Mill), Evolutionary Ethics (Nietzsche, Edward O. Wilson), and the Existentialist Ethics of Ambiguity (Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir).
    Prerequisite(s): PHL 1000 .
    Fulfills: E in LS Core
  
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    PHL 2090 - Values in a Technological Culture

    Credits: 4
    A critical examination of the way in which technological innovation has shaped our modern culture. Students will study major ethical traditions, pursue individual research projects on particular areas of technology, suggest solutions to ethical problems that arise there, and report their conclusions.
    Prerequisite(s): PHL 1000 .
    Fulfills: E in LS Core
  
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    PHL 2100(W) - Women, Ethics & Society

    Credits: 4
    What is feminism? What are the different forms of oppression? This topic-driven course explores the moral dilemmas that result from living in a patriarchal society. Students will read leading feminist scholarship on topics related to sexism, such as body image, sexuality and violence, and media representations of oppressed groups. Students will have the opportunity to determine where they stand on controversial issues by participating in class discussions.
    Prerequisite(s): PHL 1000 .
    Fulfills: E, D and W in LS Core
  
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    PHL 2110 - Environmental Philosophy

    Credits: 4
    What is nature? What is the human place in it? What kinds of changes can humanity make in an environment before it is no longer natural? Are practices like climate engineering and ecological restoration the same kind of thing? What is the proper role of science in environmental decision-making? How does the language we use to talk about nature alter the practices we perceive to be ethically responsible? This course will examine questions such as these in an effort to understand better the human relationship to nature and how best we might live within our native environments.
    Fulfills: E in LS Core
  
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    PHL 2120 - Ethics, Ecology, and the Beauty of Nature

    Credits: 4
    Normally the beauty of nature is just taken for granted, but how would we describe what makes nature beautiful? Is beauty equivalent to the ecology of the system? Is natural beauty just a cultural idea? Do we have a responsibility to preserve natural beauty? To create it? Should we judge natural landscape and human created landscapes according to the same standards? This course examines these types of questions in order for students to reflect upon the beauty (or lack thereof) found in the world around them.
    Fulfills: E and W in LS Core
  
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    PHL 2200(W) - History of Ancient Philosophy

    Credits: 4
    From the beginnings of their literature, the ancient Greeks displayed a steady concern and even preoccupation with what human beings may know and what may lie concealed from our knowing. This course will provide a survey of Greek philosophical thought organized around the theme of the problem of human knowledge, beginning with the Presocratics, then turning to dialogues by Plato and Aristotle’s comprehensive approach to nature and human knowledge, and concluding with the Stoics, Epicureans, and Sceptics.
    Prerequisite(s): PHL 1000 .
    Fulfills: W in LS Core
  
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    PHL 2230 - History of Medieval Philosophy

    Credits: 4
    The course will survey the history of Medieval philosophy.  It will pay special attention to the conflicting demands of the Medieval inheritance, the symbolic struggle between Athens and Jerusalem. On the one hand, as religious believers they placed faith and Scripture at the pinnacle of their investigations; on the other hand, as philosophers they inherited a tradition of rational human thought begun by the pagan Greeks, a tradition that did not give privileged status to faith or revelation, but which nevertheless compelled their respect by its intellectual strength. 
    Prerequisite(s): PHL1000
  
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    PHL 2250 - Philosophy of Happiness

    Credits: 4
    What is happiness? What makes people happy? Can one person make another person happy? How can anyone judge whether someone is happy? These are perennial questions not only for inquisitive minds but also for thoughtful human beings. Faced with economic, environmental, and ethical challenges, people should wonder whether happiness can be understood mainly and mostly in terms of pleasure, power, and profit. Focusing on the connection between a happy life and a virtuous life, this course explores how happiness can be defined, asks whether it can be measured, and examines the clearly indispensable but often overestimated role that it plays in a flourishing life.
    Prerequisite(s): PHL 1000 .
    Fulfills: E in LS Core
  
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    PHL 2310 - Socrates and the Examined Life

    Credits: 4
    In this course, students will focus on the ethical issues, provocations, and example of the Athenian philosopher Socrates (469-399 BCE). Though Socrates himself wrote nothing-everything we know about him was recorded by others-his inquiries into virtue, justice, and piety, his relentless cross-examination of others, and his insistence that “the unexamined life is not worth living” have set the questions and shaped the methods of a large part of ethical thinking ever since. Students will encounter Socrates primarily through a series of philosophical dialogues by his pupil Plato. But to develop a fuller-and more critical-understanding, students will also read a perceptive ancient comic lampoon of Socratic moral instruction along with key later responses to the enigmatic Socrates and his teachings.
    Prerequisite(s): PHL 1000 .
    Fulfills: E in LS Core
  
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    PHL 2350(W) - Philosophy of Augustine

    Credits: 4
    The works of Augustine focus on perennial ethical questions and moral problems, for example, freedom and responsibility, individuals and communities, justice and injustice, power and peace, imperialism and oppression, and tolerance and intolerance. The course examines the Augustinian approach to ethical reasoning and clarifies how many of Augustine’s positions are related to his arguments about values with those who think differently from him, especially the dominant philosophers of the Roman Empire, the Stoics and the Neo-Platonists. Classes focus on teaching students to engage in rigorous but respectful discussions and to apply valid rules of ethical reasoning in order to learn how to make sound moral decisions and resolve moral dilemmas in their own lives.
    Prerequisite(s): PHL 1000 .
    Fulfills: E and W in LS Core
  
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    PHL 2420 - Asian Philosophy

    Credits: 4
    A philosophical examination of the most influential traditional wisdoms of Asia: Hindu, Buddhist, Confucian, and Taoist. Considers the systems of value that emerge from such classics as the Bhagavad Gita, Dhammapada, Analects, and the Tao Te Ching. Clarifies these Eastern systems, where appropriate, by comparing and contrasting them with the value systems of western philosophical and religious traditions.
    Prerequisite(s): PHL 1000 .
    Fulfills: D and E in LS Core
  
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    PHL 2500 - Theories of Justice

    Credits: 4
    This course will critically examine alternative theories of justice, including libertarianism, socialism, liberalism, communitarianism, and feminism.
    Prerequisite(s): PHL 1000 .
    Fulfills: E in LS Core
  
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    PHL 2600 - Philosophy of Education

    Credits: 4
    ‘Educate’ comes from a Latin word meaning to lead. But when we educate, what do we lead students toward? Does education develop our nature, or reform it? How has education been viewed over history? Students will engage in critical examination of both classic and contemporary texts. Special attention will be paid to three themes: democracy and education, the role of education in a pluralistic society, and the special challenges of Catholic higher education.
    Prerequisite(s): PHL 1000 .
  
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    PHL 2700 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences

    Credits: 4
    How do the various social sciences (economics, history, political science, psychology, and sociology) conceptualize and value human activity? What methods and explanatory categories are shared and at which points do the various disciplines diverge? The ethical, epistemological, and ontological assumptions in the historical development of the social sciences will be examined as a way to answer these questions.
    Prerequisite(s): PHL1000
  
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    PHL 2730 - Philosophy of Psychology

    Credits: 4
    A critical examination of the philosophical issues related to psychology. With an emphasis on cognitive and developmental psychology, this course will include such topics as: concept formation, language acquisition, metaphors, reductionistic vs. holistic explanations, emergence, and creativity. This course will isolate and evaluate the metaphysical and epistemological assumptions made by psychologists today.
    Prerequisite(s): PHL 1000 .
  
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    PHL 2850(W) - Philosophical Hermeneutics

    Credits: 4
    Philosophical hermeneutics investigates the human experience of understanding in an inclusive way. The course thematizes how understanding operates in the humanities, the natural sciences, the social sciences, the technical and vocational disciplines, as well as in ordinary life. Thus the focus is on understanding as such and not as restricted to any specific content. Yet comparisons and contrasts also emerge, since diverse examples of understanding and misunderstanding from all areas dominate class discussions. Gadamer’s Truth and Method: Basic Outlines of a Philosophical Hermeneutics serves as a first guide to questions about evidence, knowledge, and truth in art, history, and literature. Other participants in the issues-driven dialogue include Schleiermacher, Dilthey, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Derrida, and Spivak.
    Prerequisite(s): PHL 1000 .
    Fulfills: W in LS Core
  
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    PHL 3010 - Human Rights: Theory and Practice

    Credits: 4
    In this course, we will critically examine different theories of human rights, including non-Western approaches to human rights, and we will consider the development of international human rights law. We will examine the concept of human rights and the moral and political foundations of this idea. We will analyze the distinction between civil and political rights, socio-economic rights, and group rights, and we will consider challenges to socio-economic rights and group rights. We will also examine challenges to international human rights discourse, particularly the challenge of cultural relativism. Finally, we will focus on particular cases and issues, such as women’s rights, LGBT rights, racial non-discrimination, the rights of refugees, indigenous rights and the right to self-determination, subsistence rights (food, housing, health care), the prohibition of torture, humanitarian intervention, and environmental human rights. In addition to reading philosophical texts, we will read international human rights treaties and cases, and we will consider how the system of international human rights law operates in practice.
    Fulfills: E in LS Core
  
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    PHL 3020 - Philosophy of Law

    Credits: 4
    This course will investigate philosophical issues that are central to the law. Topics may include the nature of law, the relationship between law and morality, the role of judges and adjudication, the nature of rights, the ideal of the rule of law, the justification of punishment, and the feminist critique of the law. Students will critically read some of the most influential philosophers in legal theory as well as important cases, judgments and statutes. Some questions that we will explore include: Why must I obey the law? Can an unjust law still be a law? Can civil disobedience be justified? To what extent, and on what grounds, should the law not infringe on an individual’s right to liberty, free speech and freedom of religion? Under what conditions should a person be held legally responsible for his or her acts?
    Prerequisite(s): PHL 1000 .
    Fulfills: E in LS Core
  
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    PHL 3030 - Global Justice

    Credits: 4
    This course examines questions of justice that arise beyond the state and between states. We will begin be considering the question of how justice between states or at the global level differs from justice within states. While cosmopolitan theorists emphasize that we have duties of justice towards all human beings, nationalists argue that we have stronger duties towards our fellow citizens. Is it morally permissible for states to act in their own national interests when this harms the people of other states? While we will primarily be considering questions of justice from a moral perspective, we will also consider current international law. Topics will include issues of justice concerning international human rights law, world poverty, refugees, climate change, military intervention, humanitarian intervention, international trade, and global labor practices.
    Fulfills: E in LS Core
  
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    PHL 3040 - Philosophy of Religion

    Credits: 4
    Grappling with questions of ultimate religious import: Does God exist? Is there a life for us after we die? If God made the world, how come there is so much evil? Do you have to be religious to be moral (or vice versa)? Do faith and reason contradict each other? Do mystics have a special knowledge of these matters? Is there only one true religion? Students will write a term paper researching a major question and then present their own reasoned position.
    Prerequisite(s): PHL 1000 .
  
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    PHL 3050 - Philosophy of Science

    Credits: 4
    A critical examination of the methods and goals of science, as well as analysis of how political, social, religious, ethical, environmental, cultural, and technological factors have affected the development of the sciences and how they continue to have an impact on the way that science is practiced today.
    Prerequisite(s): PHL 1000 .
  
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    PHL 3160 - History of Modern Philosophy

    Credits: 4
    The course traces the empiricist and rationalist foundations of modern philosophy, as well as its relations to developments in those fields which have come to be known as natural sciences and social sciences, by close readings of the texts of Bacon, Descartes, Hobbes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant.
    Prerequisite(s): PHL 1000  and another course in Philosophy or the permission of the professor.
  
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    PHL 3180 - Existentialism

    Credits: 4
    Existentialism focuses on the question about the meaning of human life, especially in connection with the reported death of God. Examining the origin and evolution of human values, existentialists such as Kierkegaard, Dostoyevsky, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Sartre, de Beauvoir, and Camus exercise powerful influences on contemporary ethical questions and moral problems, for example, social justice and injustice, punishment and responsibility, gender relations, imperialism and racism, the origin and evolution of values, and the roles of reason and religion in ethics. The course examines existentialist concepts, arguments, and positions, and clarifies how they arise in value disputes with essentialists, deontologists, positivists, and utilitarians. Classes encourage students to engage in rigorous but respectful discussions and to learn how to apply ethical reasoning to make moral decisions in their own lives.
    Prerequisite(s): PHL 1000 .
    Fulfills: E in LS Core
  
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    PHL 3210 - Philosophy of Mind

    Credits: 4
    The central question addressed in the philosophy of mind is: how are mental states related to physical states? This course will begin by considering the historical and contemporary theories that attempt to address this problem, including dualism, behaviorism, the identity theory, eliminative materialism, functionalism and embodied cognition. The second half of the course will be devoted to a discussion of a number of contemporary issues in the philosophy of mind, including intentionality, personal identity, consciousness, qualia, language, and social cognition.
    Prerequisite(s): PHL 1000 .
  
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    PHL 3650 - Aesthetics

    Credits: 4
    We are so immersed in the various forms of artistic expression and production in our daily lives-whether visual, musical, literary, or architectural-that we seldom stop to consider what art is and why it has such power to affect us. What makes something art? Are there objective artistic standards, or are all standards merely subjective preferences? How can different art works sometimes excite us, sometimes calm us, make us laugh, and make us cry? These are some of the questions we shall ask as we study art’s power, meaning, and social and political dimensions. Depending on the interests of the instructor, the course may emphasize a particular art form, such as painting or music.
    Prerequisite(s): PHL 1000 .
    Fulfills: X in LS Core
  
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    PHL 4020 - Epistemology

    Credits: 4
    A course on the theories of knowledge and the problems associated with knowledge currently debated in the philosophical literature. Included will be the correspondence, coherence, and pragmatic theories of truth. Other topics will include relativism, skepticism, foundationalism, reliablism, naturalized epistemology, the problem of induction, and the myth of the given.
    Prerequisite(s): PHL 1000  and another course in Philosophy or the permission of the professor.
  
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    PHL 4030 - Metaphysics

    Credits: 4
    “All things excellent are as difficult as they are rare” -Spinoza. Metaphysics is devoted to some of the rarest, most excellent, and certainly most difficult philosophical texts ever written. In studying writings by Aristotle, Kant, Hegel, and Heidegger (or philosophers of equivalent importance), we shall encounter radically different answers to the question “What is being?”: being is substance (and pre-eminently the highest substance, God); it is the necessary ground for human thought; it is the ultimate resolution of all contradictions inherent in thought; it is that which we approach through our questions but never reach. But even apart from their answers, the philosophers chosen reveal their greatness as thinkers by the variety of ways in which they understand and approach the question of being.
    Prerequisite(s): PHL 1000  and another course in Philosophy or the permission of the professor.
  
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    PHL 4200 - Special Topics in Philosophy

    Credits: 4
    This course will offer an in-depth study of a philosopher or philosophical issue.
    Prerequisite(s): PHL 1000  and another course in Philosophy or the permission of the professor.
    Three hours a week.
  
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    PHL 4800 - Directed Study

    Credits: 4
    This course allows upper class students who have acquired sufficient knowledge through a variety of courses in philosophy to pursue an intensive program of readings in a specialized area under the direction of a member of the department.
    Prerequisite(s): Approval of the Chair and consent of the member of the department whose supervision the Directed Study will be conducted.

Physics

  
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    PHY 1632 - Galileo Galilei

    Credits: 4
    This course investigates the central role Galileo Galilei played in the development of modern science, both in terms of content and procedure. Galileo’s contributions will be put into cultural and scientific context through a comparison with the contributions of his predecessors and contemporaries; including those of Aristotle, Ptolemy, Tycho, Copernicus, and Kepler. The social, scientific and philosophical forces that Galileo faced in promoting a heliocentric model of the solar system will be considered. This examination will highlight the revolutionary ideas at the core of Galileo’s experimentally based natural philosophy, ideas which are central to the scientific revolution that continues to this day. Experiments similar to those performed by Galileo will be performed in lab (e.g. Galileo’s inclined plane experiments) and examined in order to illustrate the scientific reasoning employed by Galileo in his works. Assigned reading and subsequent discussion will be based on both primary and secondary sources.
    Fulfills: Mathematics/Science distribution requirement. Fulfils a STEM requirements in LS Core.
  
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    PHY 2201 - General Physics I

    Credits: 4
    First semester of a one-year introduction to physics, without calculus. Topics normally include vectors, kinematics, Newton’s laws of motion, work and energy, momentum, torque, statics, and circular and rotational motion.  
    Prerequisite(s): MTH 1000  or equivalent.
    Corequisite(s): PHY2001L (concurrent enrollment)
    Fulfills: Mathematics/Science distribution requirement. Q and a STEM requirement in LS Core.
    Four and a half to five hours of integrated lecture, discussion, and group problem-solving a week.
 

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