May 23, 2019  
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

History

  
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    HIS 1120 - The European Experience: Early Modern to the Present

    Credits: 4
    This course examines the major events and developments in European history since about 1600, with particular emphasis upon the political context, the causes and implications of social and economic change, and cultural evolution. This course is not open to History Majors who have received credit for HIS 1131 .
    Fulfills: H in LS Core
  
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    HIS 1130 - World History 1500

    Credits: 4
    This course examines the major processes and interactions in the development of human society since the development of agriculture some 10,000 years ago to the rise of a complex global world by the 16th century. Students will be introduced to the major patterns and interconnections of world history including migration, the rise of city-states and empires, the development of global trade routes, and the influence of environmental factors on human history. This course is not open to History Majors who have received credit for HIS 1119 .
    Fulfills: H in LS Core
  
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    HIS 1131 - World History 1500 to present

    Credits: 4
    This class will examine the factors and events that shaped the history of the world after 1500. Students will examine the patterns of economic, religious, and cultural interactions such as the emergence of international trade networks, experimentation with varying forms of government, debates about human rights, technological revolutions, and the rise of literacy. This course is not open to History Majors who have received credit for HIS 1120  
    Fulfills: H in LS Core
  
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    HIS 1385 - Mystery Plays and the Transformation of Late Medieval Culture

    Credits: 4
    In the aftermath of the Black Death, European culture began a dynamic transformation. Starting in the second half of the fourteenth century, Europeans’ views on politics, government, social organization, and religion changed rapidly, marking a profound break with the Middle Ages. In this moment of evolving beliefs and identities, a new form of lay religious expression emerged, a type of public theater called mystery plays (also known as Corpus Christi plays) that were widely performed in European cities from the late fourteenth through the late sixteenth centuries. In this class students will read, analyze, and perform the late-medieval mystery plays that were an essential element of the vibrant culture of lay piety in fourteenth- through sixteenth-century Europe.
  
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    HIS 3000 - Special Topics in History

    Credits: 4
    Vary by semester and by instructor. Class may be repeated for credit with a different topic.
    Fulfills: H in LS Core
    Note: This course is usually not appropriate for freshmen.
  
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    HIS 3320 - The American City

    Credits: 4
    American urban development from the colonial period to the present. Emphasis on the influences which shaped the urban environment and contemporary efforts to rebuild American cities.
    Fulfills: H in LS Core
    Note: This course is usually not appropriate for freshmen.
  
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    HIS 3325 - History Outside the Classroom: The Practice of Public History

    Credits: 4
    This course introduces students to the practice, theory, and debates of the field of public history. Public History is historical work undertaken outside traditional classroom settings that is interpreted and consumed by the public audiences. A key goal of public history is to connect with public audiences and engage them in the process of historical creation. It can take many different forms: museum exhibits, historic sites, oral history interviews, archives, digital technologies, and documentaries, among many others. This course will provide students with a broad introduction to the many different ways in which the discipline of history can be explored outside of the classroom. The course also emphasizes experiential learning providing students with opportunities to conduct hands-on research and explore the variety of career paths available to public historians. We will pay particular attention to the wealth of public history sites in the local community. The first half of the course will examine the theory of public history and the ways in which people remember and use the past. The remainder of the course will explore the applications of these concepts in sub-fields of public history and the challenges and rewards of public history professionals in these fields. Among the questions we will explore together are: How is history communicated to, shared with, and made by the public? How does memory of the past shape our understanding of the present? What is the relationship between history and tourism? What challenges do public historians face in tackling controversial topics? Whose histories are told and why? What is the relationship between public and traditional academic history? 
    Fulfills: Fulfills H in LS Core.
    Note: This course is usually not appropriate for freshmen. 
  
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    HIS 3326 - Building America: A History of American Architecture

    Credits: 4
    This course introduces students to Native American and Western European traditions as they influenced the development of American architecture. Emphasis is placed on the historical context (political, economic, social, and cultural) of American architecture. Students also gain a knowledge of the language of architecture and the ability to identify and differentiate architectural styles and periods and have the opportunity to apply those skills in a course project.
    Fulfills: AL or H in LS Core
    Note: This course is usually not appropriate for freshmen.
  
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    HIS 3330 - World History Since 1945

    Credits: 4
    This class will examine the variety of social, political, cultural, and religious perspectives that emerged in the dynamic years after World War II. Students will study global movements such as the emergence of a nuclear world, the results of decolonization, the spread of communism, the return of genocide, the debate about rights, and the renewed faith in the power of revolutions that characterize the world since 1945.
    Fulfills: H in LS Core
    Three hours a week.
    Note: This course is usually not appropriate for freshmen.
  
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    HIS 3331 - Slaves and Spice: A History of the Indian Ocean

    Credits: 4
    This course explores the history of the Indian Ocean World from the rise of Islam through the modern era. For centuries, the lucrative spice trade captivated the attention of empires, drawing in merchants and seafarers from across Asia and Europe, as well as pirates and soldiers seeking fortune, pilgrims and missionaries spreading religion, and slaves and servants toiling in fields and homes. We will examine this cosmopolitan world including the rise of empires and European trading companies to understand how it forged today’s interconnected world. Course topics include slavery, piracy, disease, war, religion, and the fabled spice trade.  
    Prerequisite(s): This course is usually not appropriate for freshmen. 
    Fulfills: Fulfills H in LS Core.
  
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    HIS 3335 - World Environment History 1300-Present

    Credits: 4
    In today’s world, the environment has become a major scientific, political, and social issue. From global warming and natural disasters to issues such as degradation and pollution, debates over the environment have become a part of our contemporary lives. Yet these issues go beyond national borders, and many have played a central role throughout human history, such as influencing human migration or the rise and fall of empires. This course explores how the environment has influenced historical events and actions on a global scale, focusing primarily on events since 1300. In addition to examining issues ranging from climate, disease, disasters, and degradation, we will explore how the environment has been conceptualized, particularly people’s relationship with nature, and how this led to the rise of movements such as conservation and preservation. We will end the course by investigating environmental events and movements during the twentieth century and how they have begun to influence public and state policies.
    Fulfills: H in LS Core
    Note: This course is usually not appropriate for freshmen.
  
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    HIS 3350 - Ancient History

    Credits: 4
    Political and cultural history of the ancient Middle East and Europe from the earliest civilizations through the sixth century. Emphasis on the development of new political and religious systems through the study of archaeological evidence and primary texts.
    Fulfills: H in LS Core
    Note: This course is usually not appropriate for freshmen.
  
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    HIS 3355 - Barbarians and Holy Men: The History of Late Antiquity

    Credits: 4
    At the beginning of the period covered by this class Europe was dominated by the Roman Empire-uniform, pagan, and ruled from Rome. By the end of the semester we will be talking about a very different Europe-diverse, Christian, and ruled by regional, barbarian kings. This class will discuss the circumstances and events of Late Antiquity that created and allowed this transformation. We will track both the chaotic politics and exuberant religious enthusiasm of this period, and in the process study the end of the ancient world and the start of the Middle Ages.
    Fulfills: H in LS Core
    Note: This course is usually not appropriate for freshmen.
  
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    HIS 3360 - Medieval Civilization

    Credits: 4
    Cultural history of the European Middle Ages, stressing the thought, religion, literature, and art of the sixth through the fifteenth centuries. Particular attention will be given to the development of the Church, new expressions of spirituality, and the consolidation of political power in medieval Europe.
    Fulfills: H in LS Core
    Note: This course is usually not appropriate for freshmen.
  
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    HIS 3365 - The History of Muslim Communities, 600-1600

    Credits: 4
    This class will study Muslim communities from 600 to 1600, approximately the first thousand years of the existence of Islam. We will examine the variety of social, political, cultural, and religious perspectives held by Muslim communities in the Middle East, Europe, and Africa during this dynamic time period. Students will explore many kinds of evidence, including religious texts, laws, fables, art, and architecture, as they learn about major themes of this period, such as urbanization, pilgrimage, and political conquest.
    Fulfills: H and D in LS Core
    Note: This course is usually not appropriate for freshmen.
  
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    HIS 3366 - History of Modern Middle East

    Credits: 4
    This course explores the origins of the Modern Middle East. It begins by examining the role of the Ottoman Empire and its legacy on the region, before analyzing the formation of today’s nation-states, including Egypt, Lebanon, and Turkey. Other topics will include the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, the Iraq War, and the diverse role of Islam in society.
    Fulfills: H in LS Core
    Note: This course is usually not appropriate for freshmen.
  
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    HIS 3370 - Renaissance, Reformation and Exploration

    Credits: 4
    Examination of the cultural and religious history of Europe of the fourteenth, fifteenth, and sixteenth centuries. Emphasis on the art and architecture of the Renaissance, the theological and political ramifications of the Reformation, and the new perspectives and consequences of exploration.
    Fulfills: H in LS Core
    Note: This course is usually not appropriate for freshmen.
  
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    HIS 3376 - Era of the French Revolution and Napoleon

    Credits: 4
    This course examines the political, social, and economic foundations of the Ancien Régime in France to uncover both its inherent weaknesses and contradictions and those eighteenth-century trends which arose in challenge to these foundations. Once the origins and causes of the Revolution have been established, this course details the phases and consequences of the Revolution and the Napoleonic period. Particular attention focuses upon the aspirations and activities of the major social groups in the unfolding events and the continuing influence of the Revolution.
    Fulfills: H or a SOSC requirement in LS Core.
    Note: This course is usually not appropriate for freshmen.
  
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    HIS 3378 - History of Modern Britain

    Credits: 4
    This course examines the political development of Britain as oligarchy, constitutional monarchy, and parliamentary democracy from the seventeenth century to the present. Focus particularly will center on the crucial economic and social changes of the eighteenth century and beyond which made Britain the world’s first industrial society and formed the basis for its period of world hegemony. How Britain lost its status, the effects of this decline, and its role in recent European unity will also be covered.
    Fulfills: H in LS Core
    Note: This course is usually not appropriate for freshmen.
  
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    HIS 3380 - Science, Technology, and Society

    Credits: 4
    This course examines the development of technology in the modern world. Although the focus is Eurocentric, considerable attention is paid to those scientific and industrial developments, particularly the various phases of the Industrial Revolution, that profoundly affected and continue to affect the entire world. This course traces not only the elements of scientific and technological advance but also seeks to assess the far-reaching social and economic impact of technological change.
    Fulfills: H or a SOSC requirement in LS Core.
    Note: This course is usually not appropriate for freshmen.
  
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    HIS 3390 - Modern European Social History

    Credits: 4
    This course examines social structure and social groups within the context of the political and, in particular, economic development of Western Europe in the modern era. The course centers primarily on Britain, France, and Germany as three representative areas of the significant trends in social history.
    Fulfills: H or a SOSC requirement in LS Core.
    Note: This course is usually not appropriate for freshmen.
  
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    HIS 3391 - Women in Modern European History

    Credits: 4
    This course focuses on the important issues, struggles, strengths, accomplishments, and experiences of European women. It examines both the attitudes towards women and the activities of women within the political, social, and economic context of modern European history. Particular attention is paid to the ways in which women’s position has been affected by class and other factors.
    Fulfills: D in LS Core and H or a SOSC requirement in LS Core.
    Note: This course is usually not appropriate for freshmen.
  
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    HIS 3401 - Nineteenth-Century Europe

    Credits: 4
    This course examines major social, economic, cultural, and political developments of the nineteenth century. In particular, the century’s characteristic forces, such as liberalism, industrialization, revolution, evolution, socialism, imperialism, and class differentiation, will be addressed against the backdrop of events in the West.
    Fulfills: H in LS Core
    Note: This course is usually not appropriate for freshmen.
  
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    HIS 3410 - Twentieth-Century Europe

    Credits: 4
    This course follows the developments within and among the great European states throughout the twentieth century. Major events will be examined not only in their political context but also within the crucial framework of economic and social change and its implications.
    Fulfills: H in LS Core
    Note: This course is usually not appropriate for freshmen.
  
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    HIS 3412 - Hitler Mussolini, and the Fascist Challenge in Europe, 1900-1950

    Credits: 4
    This course provides an overview of the history of African Americans, from the ancient African civilizations of the fifteenth century through the black freedom movements of the late twentieth century. This course is an overview of multiple components of African American history with a specific attention to the economic, social, and political conditions of African Americans lives and the ongoing struggle of African Americans to secure first-class citizenship. Key themes of the course include: the relationship between resistance and repression, economic justice and poverty, labor, violence, the law, and gender and sexuality. The course will also explore the diversity of experiences and circumstances within and between African American communities along the lines of gender, class, sexual orientation, place, and time. We will also consider the impact of race and ethnicity on the development of the United States and its institutions and culture.  
    Prerequisite(s): This course is usually not appropriate for freshmen.
    Fulfills: Fulfills H in LS Core. Three hours a week.
  
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    HIS 3425 - Contemporary United States History

    Credits: 4
    This course explores the economic, political, and social forces that have influenced the development of the United States since the post-World War II era. The origins and the consequences of the Cold War, as well as the challenges of globalization, are given special attention.
    Fulfills: H in LS Core
    Note: This course is usually not appropriate for freshmen.
  
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    HIS 3426 - African-American History from Slave Trade to the Present

    Credits: 4
    This course provides an overview of the history of African Americans, from the ancient African civilizations of the fifteenth century through the black freedom movements of the late twentieth century. This course is an overview of multiple components of African American history with a specific attention to the economic, social, and political conditions of African Americans lives and the ongoing struggle of African Americans to secure first-class citizenship. Key themes of the course include: the relationship between resistance and repression, economic justice and poverty, labor, violence, the law, and gender and sexuality. The course will also explore the diversity of experiences and circumstances within and between African American communities along the lines of gender, class, sexual orientation, place, and time. We will also consider the impact of race and ethnicity on the development of the United States and its institutions and culture.  
    Prerequisite(s): This course is usually not appropriate for freshmen. 
    Fulfills: Fulfills H in LS Core.
  
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    HIS 3434 - Revolutionary America, 1760-1800

    Credits: 4
    This course examines United States history from roughly 1760 to 1800 and focuses on the following questions: First, why did the American Revolution occur? Second, what made it possible for diverse colonists to unite and to win their independence? Third, what impact did the war have on the different peoples who lived in North America at the time? (Or to put it another way, how revolutionary was the Revolution?).
    Fulfills: H in LS Core
    Note: This course is usually not appropriate for freshmen.
  
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    HIS 3435 - The Peoples of Early America

    Credits: 4
    This course examines the colonial period of American history, from the early efforts of Europeans to expand in the fifteenth century through the emergence of distinctive and evolving colonies by the mid-eighteenth century. We will focus on the process of encounter and interaction, as the peoples of three diverse and very different continents (North America, Europe, and Africa) struggled to create new worlds.
    Fulfills: H in LS Core
    Note: This course is usually not appropriate for freshmen.
  
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    HIS 3437 - Civil War and Reconstruction

    Credits: 4
    Emphasis on institution of slavery and ante-bellum Southern civilization, the causes of the war, the war’s revolutionary dimensions, the radical potential of Reconstruction and the conservative counter-Revolution that ended America’s first attempt at interracial democracy.
    Fulfills: H in LS Core
    Note: This course is usually not appropriate for freshmen.
  
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    HIS 3438 - History of the Early American Republic,1800-1848

    Credits: 4
    This upper level course examines the United States during a period of dynamic and often unsettling growth and transformation. We will examine the formative years of American nationhood, democracy and free-market capitalism by focusing on the social, cultural and political history of the period in a thematic, rather than strictly chronological, fashion.
    Fulfills: H in LS Core
    Note: This course is usually not appropriate for freshmen.
  
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    HIS 3439 - Slavery and Race in the Early Modern Atlantic World, 1400-1800

    Credits: 4
    Between 1450 and 1850 more than twelve million men, women and children were forced to leave Africa to face slavery in Europe and the Americas. Employing a thematic and comparative approach, this course examines the emergence, development, and significance of plantation slavery in the Atlantic World between 1400 and 1800. It will focus on four interrelated questions: First, how can we explain the emergence and development of large-scale chattel slavery in the Americas? Second, what is the relationship between the emergence of chattel slavery and the evolution of racialized thinking in the Early Modern Atlantic period? Third, what did it mean to be enslaved, and what was similar and different about the experience of enslavement across time and space in the Atlantic World? Finally, how did African men, women and children and their descendants understand, respond and even resist their enslavement?
    Fulfills: H and D in LS Core
    Note: This course is usually not appropriate for freshmen.
  
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    HIS 3440 - Survey of Latin American History: From Pre-Contact to the Present

    Credits: 4
    An interpretative overview of Latin American history, from the eve of European expansion to the present. The class lectures and discussions will explore a range of topics, including: European conquest and colonization, systems of coerced labor, race and ethnicity, religion, gender roles, labor relations, the environment, nationalism and globalization, and foreign relations. Particular attention will be paid to agency (peoples’ ability to shape, within often powerful constraints, their own histories), and diversity (of people, places and ideas).
    Fulfills: H and D in LS Core
  
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    HIS 3470 - History of Imperial Russia

    Credits: 4
    This course examines the rise and development of Russia from its origins in the Kievan principality through the collapse of the Tsarist system in 1917. Particular emphasis will be placed on the consolidation and extension of autocracy and serfdom and those institutions’ social, economic, and cultural ramifications.
    Fulfills: H in LS Core
    Note: This course is usually not appropriate for freshmen.
  
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    HIS 3471 - From Lenin to Putin: Russia in the Twentieth Century

    Credits: 4
    This course examines the history of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. Particular attention is paid to the pre- Revolutionary background, the causes of the Revolutions in 1917, Marxism-Leninism, the cultural revolution, Stalinism, and the social and economic context of political events and change from 1917 to the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 and beyond.
    Fulfills: H in LS Core
    Note: This course is usually not appropriate for freshmen.
  
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    HIS 3525 - Environmental History of North America

    Credits: 4
    This course examines some of the principal ways that human beings have interacted with the natural environment of North America from roughly 1600 to the present. Humans have always shaped and been shaped by their natural environment, and through course readings, lectures and discussions, participants in this course will examine this reciprocal relationship. Issues to be discussed include Native American management of the environment; the effects of the European ecological invasion; resource exploitation since the industrial era; the foundations of the preservationist and conservationist movements at the beginning of the twentieth century; the evolution of twentieth- century environmentalism; and the historical context of current environmental problems.
    Fulfills: H in LS Core
    Note: This course is usually not appropriate for freshmen.
  
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    HIS 3991 - Introduction to Historical Methodology

    Credits: 4
    Spring term only. Required of all junior history majors. Special attention to composition, bibliography, historiography, and research methods.
    Prerequisite(s): History majors of junior standing or consent of the instructor.
  
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    HIS 4896 - Internship in History

    Credits: 4
    Off-campus work-study experience in areas related to the discipline of history. Practical experience in editing, administration, the law, museum and historical agency work supervised by a member of the department. A field- based project is central to the experience. This program expands the occupational potential of the history major. Open to juniors and seniors with a strong academic record and with the consent of the Internship Director.
    Fulfills: X in LS Core
  
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    HIS 4897 - Internship in History

    Credits: 4
    Off-campus work-study experience in areas related to the discipline of history. Practical experience in editing, administration, the law, museum and historical agency work supervised by a member of the department. A field- based project is central to the experience. This program expands the occupational potential of the history major. Open to juniors and seniors with a strong academic record and with the consent of the Internship Director.
    Fulfills: X in LS Core
  
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    HIS 4991(W) - Senior Thesis

    Credits: 4
    Fall term only. Required of all senior history majors. Topics are selected in the complementary course, Introduction to Historical Methodology. This course includes advanced historical research and preparation of a seminar paper as well as critiques of other students’ papers.
    Prerequisite(s): HIS 3991 .
    Fulfills: W in LS Core

Honors

  
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    HON 4001H - Honors Senior Capstone I

    Credits: 2
    The senior honors capstone (HON4001H in the fall and HON4002H in the spring) is a year- long interdisciplinary seminar for Honors Program seniors devoted to project-based work combining students’ disciplinary expertise, and aimed at producing a societally beneficial outcome. Administration of the seminar will be facilitated by the program director, but it will take its form and direction from the students involved. The capstone is intended to serve as the eighth and final honors course ordinarily required of students to graduate from the Program. It will meet approximately every other week for 90 minutes.
  
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    HON 4002H - Honors Senior Capstone II

    Credits: 2
    The senior honors capstone HON 4001H  in the fall and HON4002H in the spring) is a year- long interdisciplinary seminar for Honors Program seniors devoted to project-based work combining students’ disciplinary expertise, and aimed at producing a societally beneficial outcome. Administration of the seminar will be facilitated by the program director, but it will take its form and direction from the students involved. The capstone is intended to serve as the eighth and final honors course ordinarily required of students to graduate from the Program. It will meet approximately every other week for 90 minutes.
  
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    HON 4003H - Honors Newsletter Internship

    Credits: 1
    Qualified Honors students work under the supervision of Honors Program Director in one-credit co-curricular Honors Newsletter internship offered as part of the Honors Program. Students who participate in the Honors Newsletter internship develop and improve writing, editing, photography, and digital design skills while working on award-winning Newsletter. Skills are relevant to the fields of publishing and journalism. 5-7 hours per week, depending on specific responsibilities.

Health Sciences

  
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    HSC 1000 - Careers in Health Sciences

    Credits: 4
    This course will explore the diverse professions in the Health Sciences. Students will learn the educational requirements, academic performance, and credentials needed. Students will also explore the day-to-day responsibilities of different professions, the traits that make an individual suited to the profession, as well as the expected salary and job prospects. They will also participate in experiential learning by observing professionals in the field. Faculty and peer mentors will collaborate with the students to develop an individualized academic and career plan to achieve their career goals.
    Note: This course will be offered both fall and spring and is designed to be taken the student’s freshman year (or first year in the major) as a major requirement.
  
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    HSC 1104 - Introduction to Human Disease

    Credits: 4
    The course will offer an introduction to human disease appropriate for students of all majors. The human body is a masterpiece of art. The more one understands the functioning of the body, the greater appreciation one has for it. Disease states, the body’s natural attempts to right what is wrong and the compensatory actions involved will be discussed. The general mechanisms of disease as well as specific body systems will be discussed from a human- interest point of view. The course focuses on basic medical concepts that are useful to every student and encourages them to become a medical advocate for themselves or for family members. It is so important to understand doctors and your health care plan, to be able to ask important questions, and to know what questions to ask. In addition, the course will cover many diseases that are ‘in the news’ and allow the student to gain some knowledge and insight into the myths and facts surrounding these diseases.
    Fulfills: Mathematics/Science distribution requirement. STEM requirement in LS Core.
  
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    HSC 1122 - Anatomy and Physiology I with Integrated Lab

    Credits: 4
    An introduction to the structure and function of the human body. This course will focus on the basic principles of cells and tissues, muscular, skeletal, central and peripheral nervous systems. We will take a regional approach to Anatomy and Physiology this semester in an effort to enhance your learning and understanding of the human body. This course combines lecture and lab material as a method to provide the opportunity for the student to understand, acquire and develop the practical skills necessary to comprehend the structure and function of the human body.
    Fulfills: Mathematics/Science distribution requirement. STEM requirement in LS Core.
  
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    HSC 1123 - Anatomy and Physiology II with Integrated Lab

    Credits: 4
    This course continues the human anatomy and physiology topics and includes the circulatory, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. The laboratory is a required component that will provide an opportunity for the student to further develop and apply the practical skills necessary to comprehend the structure and function of the human body.
    Prerequisite(s): HSC 1122 .
  
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    HSC 2300 - Introduction to Nutritional Sciences

    Credits: 4
    Introduction to Nutritional Sciences will introduce the student to the science of nutrition. The fundamentals of protein, carbohydrate, fat, vitamin, and mineral requirements and metabolism will be explained as a basis for the study of the relationship between diet and health in both a personal and global perspective. The impact that human nutrition and industrial agriculture have on environmental quality, food resources and energy consumption will be explored. Nutrition, Diet and Health has a mandatory civic engagement component related to important public and environmental issues in human nutrition, health, and fitness that are considered in the course.
    Fulfills: Mathematics/Science distribution requirement. STEM requirement in LS Core.
  
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    HSC 2350 - Professional Development in Health Sciences

    Credits: 2
    To provide the Merrimack College sophomore with a continuum of self and career exploration education in preparation for an internship or research experience. This professional development in health sciences course sets a foundation for building solid life and career decision-making skills through a series of exploratory exercises, as well as professionally prepares students for their upcoming internship or research experience.
  
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    HSC 3103 - Global Public Health

    Credits: 4
    Global public health is a study of the biological, socioeconomic and environmental contributors to health and disease in populations around the world. Students will investigate the determinants of health, how health status is measured, and will review the burden of disease, risk factors and approaches to global cooperation to address health problems within and between nations for successful interventions. Specific issues underlying strategies and organization for health care delivery and health services will be discussed and linked to community service projects that aim to develop social responsibility through civic engagement and humanitarian activities.
    Fulfills: Satisfies a Mathematics/Science distribution requirement.
  
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    HSC 3150 - Public Health Issues Abroad: Scotland

    Credits: 4
    This course provides students with an opportunity to explore public health in the global context. Students will spend time leading up to the travel component examining the culture, public health issues, and regulatory structures specific to Scotland. During the in-country portion of the class, students will participate in public health related service as well as cultural experiences. Upon return, students will reflect and debrief on their experiences, with a focus on comparing and contrasting public health in the US and abroad. Prerequisite: HSC3302, Introduction to Public Health.
    Prerequisite(s): HSC3302
  
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    HSC 3200 - Cultural Competence in Healthcare Administration

    Credits: 4
    Designed to examine the various issues, policies and procedures involved with the administration of a health care facility, this course will allow students to expand their cultural literacy through an exploration of varied theories and models of cultural competence through the lens of health care. Students will examine and analyze through oral and written assignments the roles of cultural differences including cultural attitudes, beliefs, and expectations as they pertain to effective healthcare in diverse settings. An emphasis will be placed on creating culturally competent health care providers, who understand the importance of delivering health care to all individuals regardless of race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, religion, class, and ability both physically and cognitively.
    Fulfills: Satisfies a diversity distributional requirement.
  
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    HSC 3302 - Introduction to Public Health

    Credits: 4
    Public health aims to understand the occurrence and causes of disease within populations with the goal of prevention and health promotion, through changes in individual behavior, control of infectious disease and environmental health factors, and social and political organization for health improvement. The aim will be to describe the patterns of selected diseases in populations, to explain the causation of disease at the cell/physiological to social levels, to predict disease occurrence and to control disease through prevention strategies aimed at individuals, communities and governments.
    Fulfills: Mathematics/Science distribution requirement. STEM requirement and X in LS Core.
  
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    HSC 3310 - Health Behavior and Promotion

    Credits: 4
    This course focuses on health behavior theories and strategies to promote individuals’ healthy lifestyle. In addition, students will explore and apply theoretically based principles and strategies to real-life cases. Emphases are placed on improving students’ competency in understanding of health behaviors in the modern world and design of theory-based interventions to improve health behaviors. 3 credit hours are devoted to didactic lecture; 1 credit hour is devoted to activity-based experiential learning.
  
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    HSC 3312 - Introduction to Epidemiology

    Credits: 4
    An introduction to basic concepts in epidemiology, the science of public health. Epidemiology is concerned with the distribution and determinants of health and disease, injury, disability, morbidity and mortality in populations. Topics will include history, epidemiological measurements of disease occurrence, descriptive epidemiology and patterns of disease, establishing association and causality, types of study designs, disease outbreak investigation, public policy and social and behavioral epidemiology.
    Prerequisite(s): HSC 3302 .
  
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    HSC 3320 - Microbiology for Health Professions

    Credits: 4
    A study of the classification and physiology of clinically important microorganisms that cause human disease, including bacteria, fungi, protozoa, prions, and viruses. The role that microorganisms play in both health and disease and the human body’s response to invading microbes will also be discussed. Laboratory investigations will focus on aspectic technique, commonly used techniques for collecting, handling, and studying clinically important microorganisms associated with human disease.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 1027  or BIO 1025 .
  
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    HSC 3322 - Environmental Health

    Credits: 4
    The purpose of this course is to introduce the field of environmental health to public health majors and those interested in environmental health issues. It places environmental health in the broader context of public health, teaching students how to evaluate environmental health problems in relation to other social, economic, and health disparity issues. The course first introduces fundamental concepts of environmental health, and the tools and methods used to study environmental exposures and diseases. By course completion, students will be familiar with the spectrum of environmental health hazards, the pathways of exposure, various media in which they are found, and disease outcomes associated with exposures. Students will also be familiar with approaches to environmental health surveillance and the federal and state agencies responsible for protecting environmental health.
    Prerequisite(s): HSC3302
  
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    HSC 3336(W) - Human Pathophysiology

    Credits: 4
    The study of human physiology altered by pathological conditions, injury and disease. The individual organ systems, their diseases, diagnosis and treatments are considered in a systemic manner, with emphasis on conditions important to community health. This seminar/laboratory course builds upon the principles and foundations of prerequisite courses and enhances the knowledge of general medical conditions and the ability to perform a more thorough investigation and patient evaluation and execute basic clinical examination and laboratory science diagnostic procedures.
    Prerequisite(s): HSC 1122 , HSC 1123 , BIO 1027  or BIO 1025 .
    Fulfills: W in LS Core
  
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    HSC 3400 - Clinical Research Design

    Credits: 4
    The course emphasizes research methods used for the conduct of human studies and will introduce students to the ethical conduct of clinical research. The research methodologies of 4 study designs will be explored, focusing on the applicability of each design to differing research questions and the benefits of each design. The course will cover the development of a good research question, study design, selection of study subjects, data collection and management, analysis and how to estimate study sample size. Students will address a current public health problem and develop a research protocol that addresses the public health problem.
  
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    HSC 3510 - Community Nutrition

    Credits: 4
    Public health efforts in communities are implemented in many different types of settings, including community non- profit agencies, worksites, health centers, clinics, hospitals, schools, churches, supermarkets, recreational and sports centers, councils on aging/senior centers, and emergency feeding sites. This intensive course provides presentations, readings and activities related to the broad range of community-based nutrition research, programs and policies. This course is required to complete the Nutrition Concentration for the Health Science Major. Students will become familiar with community-based research and programs focused solely on nutrition as well as those in which nutrition is one component. Students will engage in skill-building and participatory activities, as well be introduced to case examples of creative and innovative approaches to community nutrition. Through periodic field visits and guest speakers, students will have an opportunity to dialogue with public health experts and practitioners who can influence community nutrition practice. Upon completion of this course, the students will have a toolbox of skills to utilize and apply in a wide range of practice settings.
  
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    HSC 3520 - Foodservice Management

    Credits: 4
    This course will provide an overview of the management practices utilized to plan, direct, coordinate, and control foodservices. Students will gain an understanding of volume food production and service through a series of problem- based learning activities as well as didactic coursework. Through an emphasis on group work and an applied field practicum, students will become familiar with the techniques foodservice managers utilize to control human and financial resources required for the operation of a successful foodservice. This course is intended for health science majors with a concentration in nutrition.
  
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    HSC 3540 - Advanced Human Nutrition

    Credits: 4
    Advanced Human Nutrition will provide students with an in-depth understanding of the biochemical, physiological, and metabolic aspects of nutrition. Students will learn methods of human nutritional assessment, including dietary, anthropometric, biochemical, and clinical assessment procedures. The biochemical and physiological bases for therapeutic diets as well as problems in planning diets for normal and pathological conditions will be explored.
    Prerequisite(s): HSC2300
  
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    HSC 4800 - Directed Study

    Credits: 4
    In lieu of a formal course, qualified upper class Health Science/Sports Medicine students may take an intensive program of reading under the direction of a member of the department.
    Prerequisite(s): Departmental approval.
  
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    HSC 4810 - Directed Research

    Credits: 4
    Literature and laboratory research directed by faculty members.
    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing and consent of the instructor.
    Fulfills: X in LS Core
  
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    HSC 4815 - Directed Research

    Credits: 4
    Literature and laboratory research directed by faculty members.
    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing and consent of the instructor.
    Fulfills: X in LS Core
  
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    HSC 4850 - Health Science Internship

    Credits: 4
    A work-study experience co-supervised by the Internship Coordinator and a mentor in the workplace. Students are placed according to interest and career path in a clinical, academic, community, or industrial setting for the purpose of gaining hands-on experience in the health care field. Students who volunteer for internship in clinical, academic, and community settings provide a public service to the facility or program.
    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing and consent of the department.
    Fulfills: X in LS Core
  
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    HSC 4855 - Health Science Internship

    Credits: 4
    A work-study experience co-supervised by the Internship Coordinator and a mentor in the workplace. Students are placed according to interest and career path in a clinical, academic, community, or industrial setting for the purpose of gaining hands-on experience in the health care field. Students who volunteer for internship in clinical, academic, and community settings provide a public service to the facility or program.
    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing and consent of the department.
    Fulfills: X in LS Core

Humanities

  
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    HUM 1010 - Stories of Ancient Greece

    Credits: 4
    An exploration of the creative genius of Greece in its Classical Period (6th to 4th centuries B.C.E.) and of its roots in the earlier civilizations of Egypt and Crete. Lectures, readings, discussions and films investigate the Greek achievement in mythology, art and architecture, theater, government, philosophy, social organization and human conduct.
    Fulfills: Humanities distribution requirement. AL in LS Core.
  
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    HUM 1020 - Medieval Europe

    Credits: 4
    An exploration of the genius of medieval Europe in shaping a brilliant civilization from the often contradictory materials of Abrahamic and Greco-Roman traditions. Lectures, readings, discussions and films investigate ancient Jewish and early Christian thought and art, the evolution of the Christian Church, monasticism and learning, the rise of Islam, medieval art and architecture and the influence of the church and mosque on medieval culture.
    Fulfills: Humanities distribution requirement. AL in LS Core.

International Business

  
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    INB 4450 - Senior Seminar in International Business

    Credits: 4
    This senior capstone course provides an opportunity for students to integrate and build upon the knowledge and understanding they have developed though their international business concentration. Students will analyze current global business issues from a variety of perspectives, and apply their knowledge of economics, culture, marketing, management, accounting and finance to address problems. Learning methods will include case studies, guest lectures, comprehensive research projects, readings and extensive class discussions.
    Prerequisite(s): MKT 3320  and MGT 3357 , Senior standing in International Business or permission of the Director of International Business.

Italian

  
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    ITA 1110 - Introductory Italian I

    Credits: 4
    This course is offered for absolute beginners only. This course is not open to heritage speakers or students with any prior study of Italian. Oral-aural proficiency is acquired through speaking and role playing in class plus audio and visual practice outside of class, including internet drills from the Super Site that accompanies the book. Students learn basic strategies for reading and writing in the language.
    Prerequisite(s): No Italian classes on high school transcript.
    Fulfills: FL in LS Core
  
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    ITA 1120 - Introductory Italian II

    Credits: 4
    This course is offered for students with little or no background in Italian. This course is not open to heritage speakers. Oral-aural proficiency is acquired through speaking and role playing in class plus audio and visual practice outside of class, including internet drills from the Super Site that accompanies the book. Students learn basic strategies for reading and writing in the language.
    Prerequisite(s): ITA 1110  or equivalent or consent of the instructor.
    Fulfills: FL in LS Core
  
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    ITA 1150 - Accelerated Italian I

    Credits: 4
    Fast track for motivated students who wish to complete the Introductory and Intermediate sequence over two semesters. ITA 1150 will cover the first half of Prego! (ITA 1110 and 1120). Recommended for Honors students, pre-med & pre-law students, science majors, students majoring in another romance language, English, European history, or in an International /Interdisciplinary program with an emphasis on European studies. Recommended for students who wish to major or minor in Italian Studies.
    Prerequisite(s): placed at the ITA1120 level or below.
    Fulfills: FL in LS Core
  
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    ITA 2010 - Intermediate Italian I

    Credits: 4
    An intermediate level course with an emphasis on the study of grammar. Readings will consist of short texts from Italian literature and civilization, along with articles of contemporary relevance.
    Prerequisite(s): ITA 1120  or equivalent or consent of the instructor.
    Fulfills: The intermediate language sequence (2010, 2020) satisfies BOTH Humanities distribution requirements. FL in LS Core.
  
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    ITA 2020 - Intermediate Italian II

    Credits: 4
    A continuation of the intermediate course with an emphasis on the study of grammar. Readings will consist of short texts from Italian literature and civilization, along with articles of contemporary relevance.
    Prerequisite(s): ITA 2010  or equivalent or consent of the instructor.
    Fulfills: The intermediate language sequence (2010, 2020) satisfies BOTH Humanities distribution requirements. FL in LS Core.
  
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    ITA 2050 - Accelerated Italian II

    Credits: 4
    Fast track for motivated students who wish to complete the Introductory and Intermediate sequence over two semesters. ITA 2050 will cover the second half of Prego! (ITA 2010 and 2020). Recommended for Honors students, pre-med & pre-law students, science majors, students majoring in another romance language, English, European history, or in an International /Interdisciplinary program with an emphasis on European studies. Recommended for students who wish to major or minor in Italian Studies.
    Prerequisite(s): ITA1120 or 1150, or placed at the 2010-2020 level.
    Fulfills: FL in LS Core
  
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    ITA 2530 - Italian Women Writers

    Credits: 4
    This course will address the development of female discourse in novels written by 20th century Italian women, from the works of Nobel Prize winner Grazia Deledda to contemporary author Susanna Tamaro. Class discussions, presentations, and writing assignments will examine themes such as motherhood, female childhood and adolescence, gender roles, and relationships. Taught in English.
    Fulfills: Humanities distribution requirement. AL and D in LS Core.
  
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    ITA 2550 - Italian-Americans and Film

    Credits: 4
    From the premise that the visual image is a most powerful tool in the creation and structuring of collective systems of values, this course focuses on the cinematic representation of Italian-Americans in the works of major American and Italian-American directors from the silent era to the present. In addition, it provides a historical account of the Italian- American experience of male and female immigrants. Taught in English.
    Fulfills: Humanities distribution requirement. AL in LS Core.
  
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    ITA 2560(W) - The Italian Southern Question in Literature and Film

    Credits: 4
    A voyage through Southern Italy using literature and film, with a particular attention to the so-called “Southern Question.” Readings from such writers as Carlo Levi, Ignazio Silone, Elio Vittorini, M.G. Cutrufelli, and Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa. Taught in English.
    Fulfills: Writing intensive requirement or a Humanities distribution requirement. AL, D, and W in LS Core.
  
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    ITA 2570 - Italian Culture through Film I

    Credits: 4
    A survey of Italian films as textual, cultural, and historical artifacts. Analysis of such movements as Neorealism, commedia all’italiana, and new Italian cinema through the work of De Sica, Rossellini, Germi, Benigni, Taviani, and others. Taught in English.
    Fulfills: Humanities distribution requirement. AL in LS core.
  
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    ITA 2580 - Italian Culture through Film II

    Credits: 4
    A survey of Italian films as textual, cultural, and historical artifacts. Analysis of such movements as Neorealism, commedia all’italiana, and new Italian cinema through the work of De Sica, Rossellini, Germi, Benigni, Taviani, and others. Taught in English.
    Fulfills: Humanities distribution requirement. AL in LS core.
  
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    ITA 3010 - Composition & Culture

    Credits: 4
    An advanced study of the most important grammatical structure of Italian, and practice of these structures in the context of the skill areas of listening, speaking, reading, writing and cultural competence.
    Prerequisite(s): ITA 2020  or equivalent. Recommended as a cultural course for qualified international business students.
    Fulfills: Humanities distribution requirement. FL in LS Core.
  
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    ITA 3020 - Conversation and Culture

    Credits: 4
    This course develops students’ confidence in their command of Italian by engaging them with a variety of materials drawn from the internet or contemporary media. Through these materials and their own research, students also develop a personal connection to a specific area or region of Italy. Class work focus around larger topics: society, history, politics, food, music, literature, film, and culture.
    Prerequisite(s): ITA 2020  or equivalent or permission of the instructor. Recommended as a cultural course for qualified international business students.
    Fulfills: Humanities distribution requirement. FL in LS Core.
  
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    ITA 3050 - Attualità Italiana

    Credits: 4
    This course covers main events in Italy today. Students will learn about contemporary Italian society, its geography, education system, political events, religion, and culture. Students will also watch short documentaries in order to know contemporary issues and interests of the Italian people. Appropriate background readings, lectures, and videotaped interviews in Italian will integrate up-to-the-minute readings with the broad historical, social and cultural backgrounds of the topics in question.
    Prerequisite(s): ITA 2020  or equivalent. Recommended as a cultural course for qualified international business students.
    Fulfills: Humanities distribution requirement. FL in LS Core.
  
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    ITA 4900 - Directed Independent Study

    Credits: 4
    Intensive program of reading/writing under the direction of a full time member of the department. Provides exceptionally qualified WLCS seniors and second-semester juniors with an opportunity to work in depth on a focused topic not covered by the usual departmental course offerings. Requires a formal detailed proposal approved by the faculty members and the department chair.
    Prerequisite(s): completion of at least one language course at the 3000 level, at least three additional courses in the major, a minimum GPA of 3.0 in the major, or permission of the instructor, in addition to the approval of the chair and consent of the members of the department under whose supervision the Directed Study will be conducted.

Mechanical Engineering

  
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    MEN 2050 - Engineering Computation and CAD

    Credits: 4
    An introduction to computer programming with an emphasis on engineering problem solving and an introduction to computer aided design will be presented. Students will work on solving a series of increasingly complex engineering problems using computer coding. Students will also learn to develop 3D CAD models for physical components.
    Prerequisite(s): GEN 1001 .
  
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    MEN 3010 - Machine Design

    Credits: 4
    The design of machines and machine elements, and cost considerations. The course focuses on power transmission in machine including gears, belts, pulleys, bearings, lubrication, clutches, brakes, chains, power screws, and gear trains. Stress calculations and material selection are discussed. Broad design issues such as safety, ethics, patents, product liability, time value of money, return on investment, and breakeven analysis are covered. Students work in design teams on a major design project.
    Prerequisite(s): GEN 2012  and MEN 3020 .
  
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    MEN 3014 - Dynamics and Vibrations

    Credits: 4
    This course provides the fundamentals required to analyze moving rigid body objects. Topics include kinematics, kinetics, Coriolis acceleration, general methods of linear and angular momentum, central force motion, generalized coordinates, Lagrange’s equations, and vibrations of one degree of freedom systems.
    Prerequisite(s): GEN 2012 .
    Corequisite(s): MTH 2220 .
  
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    MEN 3020 - Materials Science

    Credits: 4
    Fundamental principles of structure and mechanical properties of materials utilized in practice of engineering. Properties of materials are related to atomic, molecular, crystalline structure, fracture, fatigue, and failure. Properties of metals, ceramics, multiphase systems, and polymeric materials are discussed. Relationships between structure and electrical, mechanical, thermal, and chemical properties.
    Prerequisite(s): GEN 2012  and CHM 1110   
  
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    MEN 3030 - Thermodynamics I

    Credits: 2
    This is the first course of a two course sequence. This course covers the first and second law of thermodynamics, thermodynamics properties of gases, vapors, and gas-vapor mixtures. The fundamental thermodynamic laws and relations are covered while the applications to cycle analysis are covered in the second course in the sequence.
    Prerequisite(s): PHY 2211 .
  
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    MEN 3032 - Thermodynamics II

    Credits: 2
    This course covers energy-systems including power cycles, refrigeration cycles and air-conditioning processes. Students are introduced to the differences between ideal cycles and actual cycles. Computer software is used to analyze complex multistage thermodynamic processes.
    Prerequisite(s): MEN 3030 .
  
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    MEN 3034 - Heat and Mass Transfer

    Credits: 4
    Students will learn the basic principles and practical calculation methods of heat and mass transfer. The course covers heat conduction, convection, and radiation as well as mass diffusion and convection.
    Prerequisite(s): GEN 3040  and MTH 2220 .
  
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    MEN 4810 - Special Topics

    Credits: 4
    Lectures, reading, study and research on topics of importance in mechanical engineering. This course is tailored to the interest of the faculty and students and offered only on demand.
    Prerequisite(s): Instructor Permission.
  
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    MEN 4820 - Directed Study

    Credits: 4
    Qualified students may propose a course of individual study and work to be conducted under the direction of a member of the department.
    Prerequisite(s): Instructor Permission.
  
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    MEN 4900 - Senior Seminar

    Credits: 1
    The first step in becoming a registered Professional Engineer is to take and pass the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) exam. This course provides a review of the exam for graduating seniors. Open to Mechanical Engineer seniors only.
  
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    MEN 4910 - Design Project I

    Credits: 2
    Real-life design projects emphasize problem definition, conceptualization, modeling, approximation techniques and optimization. Teamwork, communication, leadership and group discussions are encouraged. Student group and professional expert presentations bring awareness to diverse design issues and methodology, and professional engineering practice.
    Prerequisite(s): Instructor permission.
  
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    MEN 4920 - Design Project II

    Credits: 2
    Real-life design projects emphasize problem definition, conceptualization, modeling, approximation techniques and optimization. Teamwork, communication, leadership and group discussions are encouraged. Student group and professional expert presentations bring awareness to diverse design issues and methodology, and professional engineering practice.
    Prerequisite(s): Instructor permission.
  
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    MEN 5010 - Advanced Mechanics/FEM

    Credits: 4
    This course on the mechanics of solids covers the mathematical basis for stress analysis, models of material behavior, the finite element method and its application, and boundary and initial value problems involving deformable solids.
    Prerequisite(s): GEN 2012 , MEN 3020 .
  
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    MEN 5012 - Instrumentation/Robotics

    Credits: 4
    This course provides an introduction to the kinematics, statics, dynamics, and control issues involved in the instrumentation and design of robotic systems. Intended as an interdisciplinary course, students will interact with computer science, electrical engineering, and mechanical engineering majors to create and analyze a robotic system.
    Prerequisite(s): MEN 3014 .
  
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    MEN 5020 - Mechanical Behavior of Polymers

    Credits: 4
    The relation between structure and the mechanical behavior of polymeric materials, including the application of fracture mechanics concepts to failure mechanisms such as wear, fatigue, and environmental degradation.
    Prerequisite(s): MEN 3020 .
 

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