Jul 16, 2019  
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Computer Science

  
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    CSC 5156 - Cryptography II

    Credits: 4
    Formerly: CSC 6100
    This course is an introduction to modern cryptography at the graduate level. Topics will include a rigorous treatment of fundamental primitives including: theoretical and applied aspects of symmetric and asymmetric cryptography with associated security models, message authentication codes, stream ciphers, cryptographic hashing, digital signatures, and various advanced primitives. Necessary mathematics will be introduced as needed, though a strong background in mathematics is recommended.
    Prerequisite(s): CSC 5155 Cryptography I or consent of the instructor.
  
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    CSC 5210 - Computer Graphics

    Credits: 4
    This course explores the mathematical tools, data structures, algorithms, and hardware associated with the generation of 2D imagery and 3D scenes on the computer. Topics include OpenGL programming, 3D geometric transformations, cameras, shading, texture mapping, modeling, surfaces, terrain, and viewing and visible surface determination. Advanced topics, such as rendering, shadows, shaders, and simulation are covered as time permits. The course includes several major programming projects.
    Prerequisite(s): CSC 2620  and CSC 2820  with a minimum passing grade of C or consent of instructor. A strong background in math is expected.
  
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    CSC 5925 - Data Communications

    Credits: 4
    Formerly: CSC3925
    An introduction to the fundamentals of data communications for the computer scientists. Topics include asynchronous and synchronous transmission, analog and digital transmission of data, modulation and demodulation, multiplexing, transmission median, common carriers, communication devices, error control and recovery, message switching, packet switching, LANS, polling techniques, protocols, distributed data processing and Internet Security Tools.
    Prerequisite(s): CSC 2620  with a C or better, or EEN 2270 , or permission of the instructor.
  
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    CSC 5935 - Data Networking

    Credits: 4
    Formerly: CSC3935
    The Internet is the mainstream pathway for data communications today. The major components studied include both the hardware elements: hubs, switches, bridges, and routers and the major software elements: Five layer TCP/IP stack. The student will learn about all of these in detail during class and laboratory assignments.
    Prerequisite(s): CSC 2620  with a C or better, or EEN 2270 , or permission of the instructor.
  
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    CSC 5995 - Data Mining

    Credits: 4
    This course is an introduction to Data Mining. The course will discuss data mining primitives, machine learning algorithms and visualization for analyzing very large amounts of data from web, text corpora, biomedical databases and other sources. This course will require significant motivation for project planning, data processing and programming.
    Prerequisite(s): CSC 2710 - Analysis of Algorithms I  or equivalent, with a grade of C or better.
  
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    CSC 6010 - Theory of Computation II

    Credits: 4
    This continuation of CSC 3555 - Theory of Computation I , will explore the ideas of computability and complexity in more detail. The course will cover the topics of Turing Machines and other advanced models of computation (circuit model, oracle machines, alternating machines); complexity classes including: PSPACE, P, NP, coNP, L, P, RP, BPP, IP, AC, and AC0; and the polynomial hierarchy. Students will be expected to develop thorough proof-writing, reduction, and computational techniques, tested through regular quizzes and homework assignments.
    Prerequisite(s): CSC 3555 .
  
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    CSC 6020 - Advanced Operating Systems

    Credits: 4
    This course is an introduction to Operating Systems at the graduate level. Topics discussed will include in depth discussions of: principles of operating systems, implementations, in the POSIX model, and advanced topics such as distributed systems.
    Prerequisite(s): CSC 2820  or equivalent.
  
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    CSC 6998 - Readings in Computer Science

    Credits: 4
    This course is a graduate introduction to research in Computer Science. Students will learn to read academic papers and give strong academic presentations at the graduate level. Each student will be responsible for selecting a semester long project on which to focus their reading. This topic must be of mutual interest.
    Prerequisite(s): Graduate Standing.

Economics

  
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    ECO 1201 - An Introduction to Economics

    Credits: 4

    This course is an introduction to how people in society confront the economic problem; i.e., how societies provision themselves. Stress is given to how well the macroeconomy works. Topics include the normative criteria for judging markets, economic growth, business cycles, unemployment, inflation, financial markets and institutions, as well as monetary and fiscal policy.  Prerequisite: MTH 1000 or placing out of MTH 1000 on Math placement test. Satisfies a Social Science distribution requirement. Fulfills a SOSC requirement in LS Core.
    Prerequisite(s): MTH 1000  or placing out of MTH 1000  on Math placement test.
    Fulfills: Social Science distribution requirement. SOSC requirement in LS Core.

  
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    ECO 1202 - Topics in Introductory Economics

    Credits: 4


    This course is an introduction to how people in society confront the economic problem; i.e., how societies provision themselves. Stress is given to microeconomic analysis.. Topics include supply and demand analysis, consumer choice theory, cost functions, market structures and public policy. 

     
    Prerequisite(s): MTH 1000  or placing out of MTH 1000  on Math placement test.
    Fulfills: Social Science distribution requirement. SOSC requirement in LS Core.

  
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    ECO 1225(W) - Economics of Gender

    Credits: 4
    Examines various theories regarding the manner in which gender plays a role in determining economic outcomes. Topics may include, but are not limited to: wage differences, discrimination, job segregation and the interactions among gender, race and economic systems. Particular emphasis will be given to how public policy affects women in the United States. In addition, comparisons will be made between women’s economic status in the U.S. and other developed countries.
    Prerequisite(s): ECO 1201  or permission of the instructor.
    Fulfills: Social Science distribution requirement. SOSC requirement and W and D in LS Core.
  
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    ECO 2201 - Intermediate Micro-Economics

    Credits: 4
    This course focuses on how the price system allocates resources and goods in a manner that maximizes the well- being of society. The optimizing behavior of both producers and consumers is explained and analyzed. Their behavior under the conditions of a perfect market is shown to result in the greatest benefit to society. The breakdown of those conditions such as monopoly, power and/or externalities, is shown to bring less beneficial results. The analytic concepts used to do this are the fundamental tools of the economist.
    Prerequisite(s): ECO 1201  and ECO 1202 .
    Fulfills: Social Science distribution requirement. SOSC requirement in LS Core.
  
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    ECO 2202 - Intermediate Macro-Economics

    Credits: 4
    Utilizes various macroeconomic models to analyze the forces that determine inflation, unemployment, growth and business cycles for the economy as a whole, with special attention given to current macroeconomic conditions and issues and international economic relations.
    Prerequisite(s): ECO 1201  and ECO 1202 .
    Fulfills: Social Science distribution requirement. SOSC requirement in LS Core.
  
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    ECO 3303 - Economic Development

    Credits: 4
    Examines the economies of the developing world. Topics include a survey of economic development theories, the widening gap between rich and poor nations and peoples, measurements of economic and social development and underdevelopment, policies to eliminate world poverty, the spread of multinational corporations, and the nature of capitalist globalization.
    Prerequisite(s): ECO 1201 .
    Fulfills: Social Science distribution requirement. SOSC requirement in LS Core.
  
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    ECO 3304 - Economics of Education

    Credits: 4
    This course examines a variety of questions about the role of education in the economy and about the economic aspects of the U.S. educational system The historical development of public education in the U.S. is studied and different theories that purport to explain that development are discussed. We will investigate the relationship between educational attainment and wages in the labor market. A considerable portion of the course will be devoted to an analysis of public policy and its impact on educational outcomes, for example the impact of school choice and voucher programs. Comparisons will be made between public policy in the U.S. and other developed and developing countries, with particular emphasis on the financing of schools and the outcomes of that financing.
    Prerequisite(s): ECO 1201 .
    Fulfills: Social Science distribution requirement. SOSC requirement in LS Core.
  
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    ECO 3305 - Ecological Economics

    Credits: 4
    This course uses microeconomics to analyze ecological environmental and natural resource management issues. It considers institutions and programs affecting resource use and the impact on environmental quality, market-based regulations, valuing the environment, air pollution, global warming, biodiversity conservation, fisheries, energy, tradeoffs between environmental quality and economic growth, the determination of who bears the costs and who reaps the benefits of pollution abatement, and what institutional changes may be necessary to protect the environment.
    Prerequisite(s): ECO 1201 .
    Fulfills: Social Science distribution requirement. SOSC requirement in LS Core.
  
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    ECO 3306 - International Economics

    Credits: 4
    This course focuses on the economic interaction between countries. Topics include: the gains from trade, the goods traded, protectionism, trade blocs, balance of payments and exchange rates.
    Prerequisite(s): ECO 1201 .
    Fulfills: Social Science distribution requirement. SOSC requirement in LS Core.
  
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    ECO 3307 - Labor Economics

    Credits: 4
    Labor Economics is the one area of economic theory that has resisted the hegemony of the neo-classical model of economics with its focus on abstract, deductive reasoning. This course will present an Institutionalist analysis of labor processes with a focus on the historical development of such processes throughout the twentieth century.
    Prerequisite(s): ECO 1201 .
    Fulfills: Social Science distribution requirement. SOSC requirement in LS Core.
  
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    ECO 3308 - Managerial Economics

    Credits: 4
    This course covers microeconomic concepts relevant to managerial decision making. Topics include: demand and supply analysis, consumer demand theory, demand estimation and forecasting techniques, production theory, cost estimation, breakeven analysis, perfect competition, monopoly, oligopoly, monopolistic competition, long-term investment and risk analysis, government intervention.
    Prerequisite(s): ECO 1201 .
    Fulfills: Social Science distribution requirement. SOSC requirement in LS Core.
  
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    ECO 3309 - Marxian Economics

    Credits: 4
    Examines Marx’s theory of market capitalism through a close reading of Marx’s key texts, including Capital. Investigates Marx’s economic thought in light of his sources in economics, philosophy and social theory. Compares Marx’s economics and the work of more recent Marxian economists with other contemporary schools of economic thought.
    Prerequisite(s): ECO 1201 .
    Fulfills: Social Science distribution requirement. SOSC requirement in LS Core.
  
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    ECO 3310 - Money and Finance

    Credits: 4
    Analyzes the structures and behavior of financial and monetary institutions, policy options, and their impact on the economy’s performance. Special attention is given to interest rate determination, financial asset valuation, regulation of the financial institutions, tools and conduct of central banking, and the international monetary system.
    Prerequisite(s): ECO 1201 .
    Fulfills: Social Science distribution requirement. SOSC requirement in LS Core.
  
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    ECO 3311 - Public Finance

    Credits: 4
    Examines the economic problems of the public sector in a market economy, the proper scope of government intervention, rules for decision-making in the public sector, an evaluation of public expenditure and tax systems, cost- benefit analysis and problems of state and local government.
    Prerequisite(s): ECO 1201 .
    Fulfills: Social Science distribution requirement. SOSC requirement in LS Core.
  
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    ECO 3312 - The History of Economic Thought

    Credits: 4
    Over the past 250 years, economics has evolved as a distinct and privileged discourse. This course will examine that evolution from its roots in the Old and New Testament through its first systematic statement by Adam Smith to modern economic discourse. Special attention will be given to the question as to whether or not economists conclude that markets are institutions that assure social harmony.
    Prerequisite(s): ECO 1201 .
    Fulfills: Social Science distribution requirement. SOSC requirement or H in LS Core.
  
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    ECO 3313 - Econometrics

    Credits: 4
    Econometrics deals with the application and theory of statistical and econometric methods to problems in economics. Topics include: basic statistical theory, sampling distributions, simple and multiple regression, hypothesis testing, violations of the basic assumptions, generalized least squares, introduction to simultaneous equation models, chi- square tests and analysis of variances.
    Prerequisite(s): ECO 1201  and an elementary mathematics course.
    Fulfills: Social Science distribution requirement. SOSC requirement and Q in LS Core.
  
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    ECO 3314 - U.S. Economic History

    Credits: 4
    Covers selected topics from the pre-colonial period to the end of the 19th century. Includes the transformation of pre- colonialism, “native” economies, the economics of European colonialism, pre-Revolutionary self-subsistence and feudal agriculture, slavery and the slave trade, the transition to capitalism, industrialization with special attention to the Merrimack Valley, the creation of a national market, and the rise of the labor movement.
    Prerequisite(s): ECO 1201 .
    Fulfills: Social Science distribution requirement. SOSC requirement or H in LS Core.
  
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    ECO 3315 - Urban and Regional Economics

    Credits: 4
    Urban areas have been engines of economic growth and innovation since the dawn of civilization. They have also been beset by myriad problems such as poverty, racism, high crime, congestion and pollution. This course examines the spatial aspect of the distribution of firms and households over a geographic terrain as a means of understanding why both of these are the case.
    Prerequisite(s): ECO 1201 .
    Fulfills: Social Science distribution requirement. SOSC requirement in LS Core.
  
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    ECO 4001 - Economics Seminar

    Credits: 4
    Students do research in a particular facet of an area in economics. Emphasizes in-depth research, its methods, and presentation of the results.
    Prerequisite(s): ECO 1201 , ECO 1202 , ECO 2201  and ECO 2202 .
    Fulfills: X in LS Core.
  
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    ECO 4800 - Directed Study

    Credits: 4
    In lieu of a formal course, qualified upper class students, with the approval of the chair, substitute an intensive program of reading under the direction of a member of the department.
    Prerequisite(s): consent of the Chair and the member of the department under whose supervision the Directed Study will be conducted.
  
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    ECO 4850 - Economic Research Internship

    Credits: 8
    Student interns are placed in either public or private entities where they assist in applied economic research. They are expected to spend 20 hours per week on site and also are expected to write a research paper under the direction of one of the Economic Department’s faculty members. Available to Seniors with Departmental approval. Majors electing ECO 4850 must take seven additional Economics courses.
    Fulfills: X in LS Core.

Education

  
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    EDU 2110 - Foundations and Principles of Education

    Credits: 4
    An introduction to the social and philosophical principles which have shaped educational thought and practices viewed in historical perspective; the challenge of modern education in our urban, suburban, technological, and mobile culture; the professional, legal, and community responsibilities of the teacher; organization of the American school system; contemporary issues in education. Close examination of the social context of schooling will be included.
  
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    EDU 2130 - Diversity, Social Justice, & Ethics

    Credits: 4
    This course will focus on issues of diversity and social justice within the context of PreK-12 education. Its purpose is to develop theoretical, conceptual, pedagogical, and curricular foundations for supporting issues of equity and access as well as marginalized individuals, groups, and peoples. Themes will include urban education, immigration and English- language status, and special education. Students will examine both systemic and curricular approaches within educational settings to develop a conceptual framework as well as the practical implications of these themes and issues.
    Fulfills: D, E and X in LS Core
  
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    EDU 2210 - Child and Adolescent Development

    Credits: 4
    This course will introduce students to theories and principles of child and early adolescent development. The course will specifically address the application of such theories to educational practice, examining the biological, cognitive and social changes associated with development, birth through early adolescence. Students will engage in a service learning project to gain understanding of children in this age range.
    Fulfills: SOSC and X in LS Core
  
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    EDU 2230 - Applied Adolescent Psychology

    Credits: 4
    This course will focus on the physical, cognitive, social and emotional aspects of adolescent development from an applied perspective. Specifically, issues related to teaching adolescents in middle schools and high schools, grades 5- 12, will be considered. Students will engage in a service learning project to gain understanding of children in this age range.
    Fulfills: X in LS Core
  
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    EDU 2240 - Adult Development

    Credits: 4
    This course will introduce students to theories and principles of adult development. The course will provide an overview of developmental issues, including the biological, cognitive, learning and social emotional realms, with specific implications for applied settings.
  
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    EDU 2310 - Introduction to Early Childhood Education

    Credits: 4
    This course will focus on an understanding of early childhood care and education.  Students will be introduced to the importance of individual and cultural variations in growth and development of the young child.  Topics also include curriculum and pedagogy for program quality to support children’s learning.
  
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    EDU 2410 - The Exceptional Learner

    Credits: 4
    This course provides an overview of the inclusive classroom and an introduction to special education. Students will gain an understanding of the challenges that students with exceptionalities encounter.   The class will explore topics including:  how disabilities are identified: the roles and responsibilities of the general education and special educators in the inclusive classroom;  what necessary steps are taken to refer students for evaluations in the special education process: characteristics of students with disabilities: general issues of evaluation approaches: and, research-based accommodations and interventions including the use of assistive technology devices and behavioral interventions. Classroom differentiation strategies for the gifted student will also be introduced.  State and federal laws as well as an overview of local and national support agencies are also reviewed.
    Prerequisite(s): Early Childhood, Elementary Education, and Moderate Disabilities concentrations only, or by permission of the department chair.
  
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    EDU 2500 - Pre-Practicum I

    Credits: 0
    Pre-practica are field-based experiences that prepare TCs to become effective educators.  Pre-Practicum I is an introductory level sequence of experiences in which the TC observes the dynamics of a school community - including but not limited to SP roles and responsibilities, students’ interactions with peers and educators, and the connections between parents, teachers, and other school representatives. TCs will reflect on their own knowledge and skills as they continue to development within their coursework and practicums. (30 hours minimum required)
  
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    EDU 2510 - Pre-Practicum II

    Credits: 0
    Pre-practica are field-based experiences that prepare a TC to become an effective educator. Pre-Practicum II is the intermediate level in the sequence of experiences in which the TC observes the dynamics of a school community - including but not limited to SP roles and responsibilities, students’ interactions with peers and educators, and the connections between parents, teachers, and other school representatives. This pre-practicum provides opportunities for the TC to assist in the classroom, explore curriculum development, and practice teaching approved lessons (30 hours minimum required).
    Prerequisite(s): EDU 2500  
  
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    EDU 2520 - Pre-Practicum 3

    Credits: 0
    Pre-practica are field-based experiences that prepare teacher candidates to become effective educators. Pre-Practicum 3 is the advanced level in the sequence of experiences in which the teacher candidate observes the dynamics of a school community, including but not limited to: supervising practicioners’ roles and responsibilities; students’ interactions with peers and educators; and the connection between parents, teachers, and other school representatives. The advanced level provides the teacher candidate with experiences to assist in the classroom and plan, implement, and assess three lessons that have a positive impact on student learning. Sixty (60) hours minimum required. EDU 2500  
    Prerequisite(s): EDU 2500   and EDU 2510  
  
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    EDU 2520 - Pre-Practicum III

    Credits: 0
    Pre-practica are field-based experiences that prepare Teacher Candidates (TC) to become effective educators. Pre-Practicum 3 is the advanced level in the sequence of experiences in which the Teacher Candidate (TC) observes the dynamics of a school community - including but not limited to Supervising Practitioners’ (SP) roles and responsibilities, students’ interactions with peers and educators, and the connections between parents, teachers, and other school representatives. The advanced level provides the Teacher Candidate (TC) with experiences to assist in the classroom and plan, implement, and assess three lessons that have a positive impact on student learning. (60 hours minimum required)
    Prerequisite(s): EDU 2500   and EDU 2510  
  
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    EDU 3200 - Language Acquisition and Social Processes

    Credits: 4
    This course will examine all facets of language acquisition and usage from the perspective of neo-classical educational linguistic theory. The writings of renowned linguists (Chomsky, Whorf, Goodman, Thomason, Fishman, deSaussure, Bernstein, Spolsky, et al.) will be explored and applied to both modern and postmodern views of language. Issues of communication, policy, power, knowledge, dominance, conflict, gender, socioeconomic status, and bilingual education will be discussed, especially as those issues impact the success, or failure, of students in the U.S. public school system. This course will also address how children learn a first or second language.  A field project will be required.
  
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    EDU 3210 - Psychology of Learning and Assessment

    Credits: 4
    This course will focus on the general principles of the psychology of learning. There will be special attention paid to assessment techniques. The psychology of learning and assessment will be studied from an applied perspective. We will also consider the impact of social emotional development on the context of classrooms and schools. This course will also include an introduction to testing and measurement. An action research/workshop project will be a cornerstone feature of this course.
    Prerequisite(s): EDU 2210  (for Elementary Education) or EDU 2230  (for Middle or High School Education)
    Fulfills: X in LS Core
  
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    EDU 3300 - Administration of Early Childhood Programs

    Credits: 2
    This course prepares prospective directors to administer and manage a childcare center or out-of school program. Content provides a foundation in organizational management to guide the instructional practices of teachers and support staff and establish systems for program functioning. Students will understand the director’s leadership responsibilities, professionalism, and the role of personal awareness and reflection. Topics include state requirements and compliance standards for licensing, QRIS and NAEYC standards, legal and fiscal management, staffing of programs, personnel selection, training and supervision staff, program operations and facilities management, and family and community connections.
  
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    EDU 3310 - Teaching Reading and Language Arts

    Credits: 4
    This course will study the various components of the Language Arts: Listening, speaking, and reading and writing skills. The course examines recent research and theoretical foundations for reading instruction to gain knowledge and understanding of the current methodology and appropriate curriculum materials for the teaching of reading at the various developmental levels. This course includes the study of Bilingual Education/Biliteracy/ELL and multiculturalism. It also helps to prepare students for the required MTEL exams, particularly Foundations of Reading.
  
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    EDU 3340 - Teaching Mathematics & Technology

    Credits: 4
    This course is designed to enable prospective elementary school teachers to teach mathematics efficiently and effectively to diverse student populations. Prospective teachers will learn how to develop and coordinate learning objectives, assessment techniques, and instructional methodologies according to the psychological principles of how children learn mathematics. Attention will be given to teaching recommendations from the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics as well as the professional standards for teaching determined by the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education.
  
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    EDU 3360 - Teaching Science, Health & Physical Education

    Credits: 4
    This inquiry-based course examines how children learn science and how teachers facilitate that learning. The course will be based on a framework where students use evidence to construct explanations and engage in argumentation. The course will be set in real life settings (both inside and outside the classroom/lab) and students will become actively involved in the following: participating in and developing inquiry based laboratory investigations, teaching an inquiry based unit to elementary students, assessing student understanding, and initiating self/group reflections of implementation efforts. Health issues and physical education strategies related to elementary students will also be addressed. Observation and field experience are required.
  
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    EDU 3380 - Organization and Curriculum of the Middle School

    Credits: 4
    This course provides students with an introduction to the philosophy, organization, development and implementation of middle school courses of study. Special emphasis will be placed on the socio-cultural context of teaching in the contemporary American middle school. Examination of contemporary middle school curricula, instructional techniques and issues in assessment of student learning will also be included. Ample class time will also be devoted to in-depth discussion of classroom management, special or alternative scheduling models, and current thinking on the teaching and learning process.
  
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    EDU 3420 - Instructional Methodologies and Technology for Middle & Secondary Education

    Credits: 4
    Through an integration of conceptual presentation and hands-on learning learners will develop competence for the secondary school level (7-12) in long-term course planning, lesson plans, teacher-centered and student-centered instructional methods, learning styles, engaging students in learning, test construction, assessment and evaluation, classroom management, and learning climate. In each of these areas there will be an exploration of the role of instructional technology in fostering student success. Demonstration classes by the student will be required. Coursework will integrate the expectations for teaching found in Curriculum Frameworks and Instructional Technology Standards.
    Fulfills: X in LS Core
  
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    EDU 3480 - Organization and Curriculum of the Secondary School

    Credits: 4
    This course provides students with an introduction to the philosophy, organization, development and implementation of high school courses of study. Special emphasis will be placed on the socio-cultural context of teaching in the contemporary American high school. Examination of contemporary high school curricula, instructional techniques and issues in assessment of student learning will also be included. Ample class time will also be devoted to in-depth discussion of classroom management, special or alternative scheduling models, and current thinking on the teaching and learning process.
  
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    EDU 3620 - Cultural Diversity in the Schools

    Credits: 4
    Focuses on the design and development of elementary, moderate disabilities and middle school programs that address cultural diversity including different racial, ethnic, cultural and linguistic groups as well as educational issues related to gender and exceptionality. Special focus will be put on the development of ESL (English as a Second Language) programs. This course examines the philosophy, history and recent curriculum trends for multicultural education including the concepts and issues of culture, cultural pluralism, bicultural/bilingualism, ethnicity and global education. Fulfills D and X in LS Core.
  
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    EDU 4020 - Assessments in Special Education

    Credits: 4
    Students will examine the role assessment plays in the identification of a disability to the IEP development and classroom and assistive technology accommodations necessary for students with disabilities to access the general education curriculum.  The focus of the course is on report writing and IEP development based on assessment application and analysis. This course will also investigate federal and state regulations regarding mandated timelines for completion of the eligibility determination process.  Further, the role of outside agencies will be identified in the IEP development process.
    Prerequisite(s): EDU 2410   and Moderate Disabilities concentrations only.
  
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    EDU 4040 - Reading in the Content Areas

    Credits: 2
    This course will focus on the importance of reading across the curriculum. Theories of reading and techniques for improving student reading and comprehension skills will be explored. Must be taken in the same semester as EDU 4050 , EDU 4060 , EDU 4100 , EDU 4120 , EDU 4140 , or EDU 4160 .
  
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    EDU 4050 - Special Methods for the Middle School

    Credits: 2
    This course will focus on methods and materials for Middle School teaching (5-8). Topics to be examined include appropriate teaching strategies and approaches for addressing the middle school age student needs as well as the design of an effective middle school curriculum. Developments in curriculum materials, and innovations, current and planned, in the area of middle school teaching will be explored. Observation of selected school classes and demonstration lessons by the student will be required as part of Special Methods. EDU 4050 must be taken in the same semester as EDU 4040 .
  
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    EDU 4060 - Special Methods for the Secondary School - Special Methods in Subject Fields - Special Methods of Teaching English gr. 8-12

    Credits: 2
    The emphasis is on the adaptation of general methods to the particular subject area and the development of the individual skills and techniques required in the subject field. Developments in curriculum materials, and innovations, current and planned, in the specific teaching subjects will be explored. Observation of selected school classes and demonstration lessons by the student will be required as part of Special Methods. EDU 4060 - EDU 4160  must be taken in the same semester as EDU 4040 .
    Fulfills: X in LS Core
  
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    EDU 4100 - Special Methods for the Secondary School - Special Methods in Subject Fields - Special Methods of Teaching Social Science gr. 8-12

    Credits: 2
    The emphasis is on the adaptation of general methods to the particular subject area and the development of the individual skills and techniques required in the subject field. Developments in curriculum materials, and innovations, current and planned, in the specific teaching subjects will be explored. Observation of selected school classes and demonstration lessons by the student will be required as part of Special Methods. EDU 4060  - EDU 4160  must be taken in the same semester as EDU 4040 .
    Fulfills: X in LS Core
  
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    EDU 4120 - Special Methods for the Secondary School - Special Methods in Subject Fields - Special Methods of Teaching Mathematics gr. 8-12

    Credits: 2
    The emphasis is on the adaptation of general methods to the particular subject area and the development of the individual skills and techniques required in the subject field. Developments in curriculum materials, and innovations, current and planned, in the specific teaching subjects will be explored. Observation of selected school classes and demonstration lessons by the student will be required as part of Special Methods. EDU 4060  - EDU 4160  must be taken in the same semester as EDU 4040  .
    Fulfills: X in LS Core
  
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    EDU 4140 - Special Methods for the Secondary School - Special Methods in Subject Fields - Special Methods of Teaching Science gr. 8-12

    Credits: 2
    The emphasis is on the adaptation of general methods to the particular subject area and the development of the individual skills and techniques required in the subject field. Developments in curriculum materials, and innovations, current and planned, in the specific teaching subjects will be explored. Observation of selected school classes and demonstration lessons by the student will be required as part of Special Methods. EDU 4060  - EDU 4160  must be taken in the same semester as EDU 4040 .
    Fulfills: X in LS Core
  
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    EDU 4160 - Special Methods for the Secondary School - Special Methods in Subject Fields - Special Methods of Teaching Modern Languages gr. 5-12

    Credits: 2
    The emphasis is on the adaptation of general methods to the particular subject area and the development of the individual skills and techniques required in the subject field. Developments in curriculum materials, and innovations, current and planned, in the specific teaching subjects will be explored. Observation of selected school classes and demonstration lessons by the student will be required as part of Special Methods. EDU 4060  - EDU 4160 must be taken in the same semester as EDU 4040 .
    Fulfills: X in LS Core
  
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    EDU 4220 - Differentiation & Instruction

    Credits: 2
    This course will review current practices in differentiated instruction for children at all ability levels. The major areas to be covered in this course will include the characteristics and needs of typically developing children and those with communication problems, visual and hearing impairments, physical and health-related challenges, intellectual disabilities, learning disabilities, gifted and talented attributes, and emotional and behavioral disorders.
  
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    EDU 4221 - Positive Learning Environments and Behavior Interventions

    Credits: 2
    This course emphasizes the importance of creating and maintaining a safe and collaborative learning environment for all students. Preservice teachers gain knowledge and skills to employ a variety of strategies to assist students in developing social and emotional self-regulation skills and responsible decision making. The course also focuses on valuing diversity and motivation for students to take academic risks and challenges and establish and maintain effective routines and procedures that promote positive student behavior.
  
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    EDU 4260 - Counseling and Guidance in the Schools

    Credits: 4
    This course will provide an introduction to theory and practice of school counseling and guidance. Competencies focused on in this course will include the development of rapport and communication skills, interviewing techniques, evaluation and interpretation of cumulative records and test results/testing reports. This course will also provide students with an overview of laws affecting school counseling/guidance. The ethical issues related to counseling and guidance will also be reviewed. Service learning will be required and this will add a supervised field component to this course.
    Prerequisite(s): EDU 2210  or EDU 2230  or permission of the department
  
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    EDU 4320 - Teaching Social Studies

    Credits: 2
    The course content will address various aspects of social studies education such as global awareness, cultural diversity, the development of geography skills and the planning and implementation of social studies units. The needs of bilingual, ELL and special needs students in these curriculum areas will be studied. In each area there will be a focus on the methodology, materials and theoretical foundations for the specific curriculum scope and sequence. Students will be required to develop instructional folders for each curriculum area. EDU 4320 must be taken in the same semester as EDU 4340 - Children’s Literature .
  
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    EDU 4340 - Children’s Literature

    Credits: 2
    This course addresses children’s and young adult literature and literary techniques, as well as basic principles and concepts in the teaching of visual and performing arts to children. Included are genre characteristics and identification, recognition of quality literature, and artistic elements of illustration. Students will apply essential skills unique to teaching each art form - dance, music, theatre, visual arts - to children and the integration of these into other disciplines. EDU 4340 must be taken the same semester as EDU 4320 .
  
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    EDU 4480 - Critical Education: Theory, Literacy, and Pedagogy

    Credits: 4
    This course will examine the modern and postmodern “critical” movements in the field of Education. Special emphasis will be placed on the three most well-known areas of critical education - theory, literacy, and pedagogy. Writings/ideas of prolific researchers/theorists/activists will be a significant part of the course. Examples will be drawn from a variety of text and journal resources as well as from the lived schooling experiences of students enrolled in the class. Included in this course will be an exploration of why schools are a critically important reflection of broader societal, political and socioeconomic concerns and conditions.
  
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    EDU 4500 - Curriculum Design Across All Content Areas for Children with Moderate Disabilities

    Credits: 4
    The course will focus on the design and modification/adaptations/accommodations of curriculum, instructional materials, and the general education classroom environments for students with moderate disabilities. It will address ways of preparing and maintain students with disabilities in the general education classroom across all content areas; through the use of behavior management principles, Universal Design for Learning (UDL), as well as other inclusive practices. This course will also review the Response to Intervention (RTI) process. Current trends in early intervention screening processes and instruments used to assess children will be also be reviewed and discussed.
    Prerequisite(s): EDU 2410  
  
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    EDU 4582 - Sheltered English Instruction

    Credits: 4
    This course will assist teachers in preparing to effectively design content instruction for English Language Learners (ELLs) to achieve academic success as they prepare for their futures in the 21st century global economy. Effective research-based strategies will be practiced and analyzed, and students will have opportunities for feedback and reflection. Upon successful completion of this course, participating teachers will receive Sheltered English Immersion (SEI) endorsement. An overall course grade of C or better is required to be eligible for the SEI Teacher Endorsement. All core academic teachers responsible for the education of one or more English Language Learners in public schools are required to earn SEI Teacher Endorsement.
    Prerequisite(s): Faculty consent required.
  
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    EDU 4683 - Gender and Education

    Credits: 4
    How does gender affect our experiences with education? What educational environments support the growth and development of students of all genders? What difference does gender make with respect to teaching and learning, and both inside and outside of the classroom engagement? These questions are central to understanding the role that gender plays in education. This course will examine educational theory, practice, and policy through the lens of gender identity and equity across the K-16 spectrum, and will focus on development of gender-inclusive environments. This class is cross-listed in Women’s and Gender Studies for both graduates and advanced undergraduates.
  
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    EDU 4800 - Directed Study

    Credits: 4
    In lieu of a formal course, qualified upper class students may, with the approval of the chair, substitute an intensive program of reading under the direction of a member of the department.
  
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    EDU 4810 - Directed Research

    Credits: 4
    In lieu of a formal course, a student may, with the approval of the chair, pursue an intensive program of research under the direction of a member of the department.
  
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    EDU 4900 - Practicum - Moderate Disabilities

    Credits: 12
    The culminating experience for the teacher preparation program is a 450 hour field based practicum and co-requisite seminar.  During the practicum, teacher candidates (TC) must successfully complete the Candidate Assessment of Performance process (CAP) in order to complete the teacher preparation program.  The CAP assesses a TC’s readiness in relations to the Professional Standards for Teachers (PSTs). CAP parallels the Massachusetts Educator Evaluation system in order to better prepare TCs and ensure that they are ready to be effective on day one. It measures the TC’s practice across a range of key indicators as outlined in the Guidelines for the Professional Standards for Teacher and supports them in improving their practice based on the results.  Teacher of Students with Moderate Disabilities (for PreK-8) are required to complete 450 hours in an inclusive general education setting or 112 hours in an inclusive general education setting and 338 hours in a separate or substantially separate setting for students with moderate disabilities.  
    Prerequisite(s):
    • EDU 2500  
    • EDU 2510 
    • EDU 2520 
    • 3.0 GPA in program
    • successful completion of all related MTELs
      • Communications and Literacy (01) - Reading sub-test
      • Communications and Literacy (01) - Writing sub-test
      • General Curriculum (03) - Math sub-test
      • General Curriculum (03) - Multi-Subject sub-test
      • Foundations of Reading (90)
    • positive PDQs
    • approval from the TEP committee

    Corequisite(s): EDU 4920   or EDU 4921  
    Fulfills: X in LS Core
  
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    EDU 4901 - Practicum - Middle Schools

    Credits: 12
    The culminating experience for the teacher preparation program is a field based practicum. During the practicum, students demonstrate competency in the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (ESE) Professional Standards for Teachers (PST) and Subject Matter Knowledge (SMK) standards under the direct supervision of a licensed Supervising Practitioner and Program Supervisor. Students will continue to develop the knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary to effectively apply the standards and demonstrate through direct teaching.
    Prerequisite(s):
    • EDU 2500   
    • EDU 2510  
    • EDU 2520  
    • 3.0 GPA in program
    • successful completion of all related MTELs
      • Communications and Literacy (01) - Reading sub-test
      • Communications and Literacy (01) - Writing sub-test
      • Subject-specific MTEL
    • positive PDQs
    • approval from the TEP committee

    Corequisite(s): EDU 4920    or EDU 4921  
    Fulfills: X in LS Core
  
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    EDU 4902 - Practicum - Secondary Schools

    Credits: 12
    The culminating experience for the teacher preparation program is a field based practicum. During the practicum, students demonstrate competency in the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (ESE) Professional Standards for Teachers (PST) and Subject Matter Knowledge (SMK) standards under the direct supervision of a licensed Supervising Practitioner and Program Supervisor. Students will continue to develop the knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary to effectively apply the standards and demonstrate through direct teaching.
    Prerequisite(s):
    • EDU 2500  
    • EDU 2510  
    • EDU 2520  
    • 3.0 GPA in program
    • successful completion of all related MTELs
      • Communications and Literacy (01) - Reading sub-test
      • Communications and Literacy (01) - Writing sub-test
      • Subject-specific MTEL
    • positive PDQs
    • approval from the TEP committee

    Corequisite(s): EDU 4920   or EDU 4921  
    Fulfills: X in LS Core
  
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    EDU 4903 - Practicum - Elementary Schools

    Credits: 12
    The culminating experience for the teacher preparation program is a 450 hour field based practicum and co-requisite seminar.  During the practicum, teacher candidates (TC) must successfully complete the Candidate Assessment of Performance process (CAP) in order to complete the teacher preparation program.   The CAP assesses a TC’s readiness in relations to the Professional Standards for Teachers (PSTs). CAP parallels the Massachusetts Educator Evaluation system in order to better prepare TCs and ensure that they are ready to be effective on day one. It measures the TC’s practice across a range of key indicators as outlined in the Guidelines for the Professional Standards for Teacher and supports them in improving their practice based on the results.
    Prerequisite(s):
    • EDU 2500 
    • EDU 2510
    • EDU 2520
    • 3.0 GPA in program
    • successful completion of all related MTELs
      • Communications and Literacy (01) - Reading sub-test
      • Communications and Literacy (01) - Writing sub-test
      • General Curriculum (03) - Math sub-test
      • General Curriculum (03) - Multi-Subject sub-test
      • Foundations of Reading (90)
    • positive PDQs
    • approval from the TEP committee

    Corequisite(s): EDU 4920  or EDU 4921 
    Fulfills: X in LS Core
  
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    EDU 4904 - Practicum - Elementary Schools

    Credits: 6
    The culminating experience for the teacher preparation program is a 450 hour field based practicum and co-requisite seminar.  During the practicum, teacher candidates (TC) must successfully complete the Candidate Assessment of Performance process (CAP) in order to complete the teacher preparation program.   The CAP assesses a TC’s readiness in relations to the Professional Standards for Teachers (PSTs). CAP parallels the Massachusetts Educator Evaluation system in order to better prepare TCs and ensure that they are ready to be effective on day one. It measures the TC’s practice across a range of key indicators as outlined in the Guidelines for the Professional Standards for Teacher and supports them in improving their practice based on the results.
    Prerequisite(s):
    • EDU 2500  
    • EDU 2510  
    • EDU 2520  
    • 3.0 GPA in program
    • successful completion of all related MTELs
      • Communications and Literacy (01) - Reading sub-test
      • Communications and Literacy (01) - Writing sub-test
      • General Curriculum (03) - Math sub-test
      • General Curriculum (03) - Multi-Subject sub-test
      • Foundations of Reading (90)
    • positive PDQs
    • approval from the TEP committee

    Corequisite(s): EDU 4920    or EDU 4921   
    Fulfills: X in LS Core
  
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    EDU 4905 - Practicum - Early Childhood Education

    Credits: 12
    The culminating experience for the teacher preparation program is a 450 hour field based practicum and co-requisite seminar.  During the practicum, teacher candidates (TC) must successfully complete the Candidate Assessment of Performance process (CAP) in order to complete the teacher preparation program.   The CAP assesses a TC’s readiness in relations to the Professional Standards for Teachers (PSTs). CAP parallels the Massachusetts Educator Evaluation system in order to better prepare TCs and ensure that they are ready to be effective on day one. It measures the TC’s practice across a range of key indicators as outlined in the Guidelines for the Professional Standards for Teacher and supports them in improving their practice based on the results.  Early Childhood practicum is (100 hours in PreK-K, 200 hours in 1-2; at least one setting must include children with disabilities).
    Prerequisite(s):
    • EDU 2500  
    • EDU 2510  
    • EDU 2520  
    • 3.0 GPA in program
    • successful completion of all related MTELs
      • Communications and Literacy (01) - Reading sub-test
      • Communications and Literacy (01) - Writing sub-test
      • Foundations of Reading (90)
      • Early Childhood (02) 
    • positive PDQs
    • approval from the TEP committee

    Corequisite(s): EDU 4920   or EDU 4921  
    Fulfills: X in LS Core
  
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    EDU 4906 - Practicum - Early Childhood Education

    Credits: 6
    The culminating experience for the teacher preparation program is a 450 hour field based practicum and co-requisite seminar.  During the practicum, teacher candidates (TC) must successfully complete the Candidate Assessment of Performance process (CAP) in order to complete the teacher preparation program.   The CAP assesses a TC’s readiness in relations to the Professional Standards for Teachers (PSTs). CAP parallels the Massachusetts Educator Evaluation system in order to better prepare TCs and ensure that they are ready to be effective on day one. It measures the TC’s practice across a range of key indicators as outlined in the Guidelines for the Professional Standards for Teacher and supports them in improving their practice based on the results. Early Childhood practicum is (100 hours in PreK-K, 200 hours in 1-2; at least one setting must include children with disabilities).
    Prerequisite(s):
    • EDU 2500  
    • EDU 2510  
    • EDU 2520  
    • 3.0 GPA in program
    • successful completion of all related MTELs
      • Communications and Literacy (01) - Reading sub-test
      • Communications and Literacy (01) - Writing sub-test
      • Early Childhood (02)
      • Foundations of Reading (90)
    • positive PDQs
    • approval from the TEP committee

    Corequisite(s): EDU 4920   or EDU 4921  
    Fulfills: X in LS Core
  
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    EDU 4907 - Practicum - Early Childhood Education

    Credits: 4
    The culminating experience for the teacher preparation program is a 450 hour field based practicum and co-requisite seminar.  During the practicum, teacher candidates (TC) must successfully complete the Candidate Assessment of Performance process (CAP) in order to complete the teacher preparation program.   The CAP assesses a TC’s readiness in relations to the Professional Standards for Teachers (PSTs). CAP parallels the Massachusetts Educator Evaluation system in order to better prepare TCs and ensure that they are ready to be effective on day one. It measures the TC’s practice across a range of key indicators as outlined in the Guidelines for the Professional Standards for Teacher and supports them in improving their practice based on the results. Early Childhood practicum is (100 hours in PreK-K, 200 hours in 1-2; at least one setting must include children with disabilities).
    Prerequisite(s):
    • EDU 2500  
    • EDU 2510  
    • EDU 2520  
    • 3.0 GPA in program
    • successful completion of all related MTELs
      • Communications and Literacy (01) - Reading sub-test
      • Communications and Literacy (01) - Writing sub-test
      • Foundations of Reading (90)
      • Early Childhood (02) 
    • positive PDQs
    • approval from the TEP committee

    Corequisite(s): EDU 4920   or EDU 4921  
    Fulfills: X in LS Core
  
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    EDU 4920 - Seminar: Practicum Organization

    Credits: 0
    This seminar gives the students the opportunity to accept full responsibility for planning, organizing, and managing their practicum responsibilities.
  
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    EDU 4921 - Seminar: Practicum Implementation

    Credits: 0
    The seminar is designed to help Teacher Education Program candidates reflect on current practices, challenges, resolutions, and search for personal meaning. The seminar will focus on the completion of the CAP.
  
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    EDU 4999 - Honors Research Seminar

    Credits: 4
    This Honors Seminar is for Education majors (Juniors) who wish to pursue a specialized research project prior to the Practicum in senior year. Weekly discussions and presentation of progress on research are required. Consent of the instructor and department chair is required.
  
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    HDE 1050 - Applied Infancy Development

    Credits: 4
    This course is intended for undergraduate students majoring in human development. As an introductory course, the goal is to survey the field of infant development (from birth to three), its theories, and its methods. Students will explore what is known about typical and atypical development across the developmental domains including physical, language, cognitive, and social emotional development. The course will provide a framework for students to undertstand how development occurs across these domains and how researchers come to understand these various aspects of development. Additionally, students will explore the role of culture and context and its influence on infant development. 
    Prerequisite(s): HDE 1000  
  
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    HDE 4260 - Introduction to Counseling Across Professions


    Formerly: EDU 4260   
    This course will provide an introduction to theory and practice of counseling in the helping professions. Students will focus on development of communication skills, interviewing techniques, and obtain certification in Mental Health First Aid. Additionally, students will explore aspects of counseling in a variety of professions, establish a basic understanding of counseling process and engage in group and small instructional practices for social/emotional, career, and academic support. NOTE: this course involves interactive counseling exercises and discussion around mental health issues.
    Prerequisite(s): HDE 1000   or PSY 1000  
  
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    MTE 1411 - Algebra for Elementary Teachers

    Credits: 2
    This course is the second of a three-part sequence designed to help prospective elementary school teachers develop a deep understanding of the underlying structure of mathematics. The course will include a detailed study of: algebraic expressions, equations, ratio and proportional relationships, and functions. Students  will be expected to demonstrate not only that they know how to do algebra but that they can explain in multiple ways why it makes sense. Particular emphasis will be given to (1) the use of multiple representations, (2) accurate mathematical communication, (3) connections between mathematical ideas, (4) application of mathematical reasoning and (5) solving problems using mathematical habits of mind. Students are required to pass all three courses in this sequence prior to enrolling in EDU 3340 Teaching Mathematics.
    Prerequisite(s): MTE 1410  

Electrical Engineering

  
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    EEN 1001W - Introduction to Engineering

    Credits: 4
    This course provides freshman engineering students with the communication skills needed in college and throughout their careers, and introduces them to the profession of engineering, computer skills, report generation, public speaking, leadership and teamwork skills are covered. This course is the electrical engineering version of the introductory course taken by all Engineering majors, and along with a general introduction to engineering tools concepts of voltage, current, resistance and reactance are covered. Applications covered include basic circuits including power and energy calculations.
    Fulfills: W in LS Core
    Three lecture hours and three lab hours a week.
  
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    EEN 1065 - Introduction to Electricity and Electronics for Non Engineers

    Credits: 4
    This course is designed to introduce in a non-intimidating way the large realm of electricity and electronics that surrounds our daily experience. Beyond lectures and numerous demonstrations, it will provide a “hands-on” experience through simple lab experiments and applications. Starting with the basic laws of electricity, it will next evolve to the devices that manipulate electricity, and finally advance to a discussion of general systems and their operations. The “hands-on” experience will facilitate and enable non engineering students to unravel the mysteries of this discipline and reinforce their intuitive knowledge with practical and useful experience. Open to Non EE Majors Only.
    Fulfills: Mathematics/Science distribution requirement. STEM requirement in LS Core.
    Three lecture hours supplemented by regular laboratory experiences.
  
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    EEN 1177 - Renewable Energy and the Environment

    Credits: 4
    This course combines both theory and nuts and bolts experience with electricity, energy production, and renewable energy topics. Students first learn the very basics of electricity - voltage, current, Ohm’s law. Power and the generation of power will be covered. The amount of coal needed to generate electricity to carry out various everyday tasks is explored. Renewable energy and energy efficiency are introduced. The cost of power is discussed. Real world applications are incorporated - student homes become “lab areas” where energy use of appliances is evaluated, along with actual analysis of electric bills. As the course progresses, issues pertaining to the impact of fossil fuel dependence on the environment are explored.
    Fulfills: Mathematics/Science distribution requirement. STEM requirement in LS Core.
    Note: Credit cannot be awarded for both EEN 1065  and EEN 1177.
  
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    EEN 1200 - Digital Fundamentals

    Credits: 4
    The design and analysis of digital systems that the bit, gate, flip-flop level with particular emphasis on the application of digital systems. Topics include Boolean algebra, logic gates, and integrated circuit design including the use of Karnaugh maps to minimize the number of gates; combinational systems such as arithmetic circuits, decoders, encoders, and multiplexers, and dynamic logic blocks as latches, Flip-Flops, counters and shift registers. Laboratory projects will involve designing, building, and testing of some digital systems.
    Prerequisite(s): EEN 1001W  or by examination by professor or EEN 1065 , and MTH 1000  with a C or higher.
    Three hours of lecture a week and one three-hour laboratory a week.
  
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    EEN 2130 - Circuit Theory I

    Credits: 4
    Course addresses the fundamentals of circuit theory including, Ohm’s Law and resistive circuits, Kirchhoff’s current and voltage laws, basic DC circuit analysis and network theorems, nodal and loop analysis, and equivalent circuit concepts. The study of capacitors, inductors, and transient circuits, including their many applications, are also covered.
    Prerequisite(s): MTH 1217  with a C (2.0) or higher.
    Three hours of lecture a week and one three-hour laboratory a week.
  
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    EEN 2140 - Circuit Theory II

    Credits: 4
    This course is a continuation of EEN 2130 , with focus on AC circuit analysis, including: transient response of RC and RL circuits, and AC steady-state circuit concepts including forcing functions, phasors, and impedance. Also covered are such topics as steady-state power analysis, polyphase circuits, frequency response, and discussion of network performance.
    Prerequisite(s): EEN 2130 .
    Three hours of lecture a week and one three-hour laboratory a week.
  
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    EEN 2250 - Assembly for Electrical Engineering

    Credits: 2
    Computer structure and machine language, representation of numeric and character data, mnemonic operations including the data transfer, arithmetic, branching, and bit manipulation operations, symbolic addressing, addressing modes, subroutines and procedures, macros, and input /output as they are implemented on an IBM PC (Pentium).
    Prerequisite(s): CSC 1610  or Equivalent.
    Three hours of lecture and lab a week.
  
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    EEN 2270 - Embedded Microprocessors

    Credits: 4
    Today’s computers fall into two categories. The first uses high performance microprocessors such as the Pentium Class of Processors. The second category focuses on issues of space, cost, low power and fast development in products such as wireless phones, automobiles, security systems, and washing machines. This course focuses on the second category and the Hardware and Software design of these controllers. Students will learn how to design embedded systems via both lecture and laboratory instruction. Laboratory projects will include designing, building and testing of these systems and evaluating the HW/SW tradeoffs.
    Prerequisite(s): EEN 1200  and EEN 2250 . Alternatively, CSC 3720 or CSC 4720  can take the place of EEN 1200  and EEN 2250 .
    Three hours of lecture a week and one three-hour laboratory a week.
  
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    EEN 3130 - Linear Signals and Systems

    Credits: 4
    Continuous time linear signals and systems are described and analyzed in both time and frequency domains. Sinusoids (complex exponentials) and differential equations are used to represent signals and systems in the time domain with response developed via the convolution integral. Frequency domain analysis includes the capabilities of the Fourier series, Fourier transform and the Laplace transform. Applications in signal processing are included to provide context for the analysis technique.
    Prerequisite(s): EEN 2140  and MTH 2220 .
    Four hours of lecture a week.
  
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    EEN 3210 - Electronics I

    Credits: 4
    The semiconductor pn junction, diodes, diode circuits, and its application are studied. A detailed study of field effect transistors (FETs), including physical structure and regions of operation, DC biasing circuits design and analysis, ac small signal equivalent circuit, switching and amplifier applications. Design and analysis of common-source, emitter follower amplifiers using FETs. A detailed study of bipolar junction transistors (BJTs), including physical structure- and regions of operation, DC biasing circuits design and analysis.
    Prerequisite(s): EEN 2140 , CHM 1180  or equivalent.
    Three hours of lecture a week and one three-hour laboratory a week.
  
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    EEN 3220 - Electronics II

    Credits: 4
    A detailed study of bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) ac large and small signal equivalent circuit, switching and amplifier applications. Design and Analysis of common-source and emitter followers at low and high frequencies. An introduction to operational amplifier (op-amps), its characteristics and applications. Analyzing several ideal op-amps such as inverter and non-inverter. Designing and analyzing FETs and BJTs, current sources (current mirrors). Basic understanding the characteristics and terminology of the ideal differential amplifier. Analyzing the basic bipolar differential amplifier.
    Prerequisite(s): EEN 3210 .
    Three hours of lecture a week and one three-hour laboratory a week.
  
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    EEN 3270 - Energy, Generation, Conservation and Technology

    Credits: 4
    Course covers generation, transmission and distribution of U.S. electrical power systems. Faradays’ law is covered, with applications to generators and transformers. A significant portion of the course is devoted to Energy Efficiency and Renewable energy (EERE) topics, including wind, hydro and solar. The importance of EERE in light of present environmental, economic and ethical considerations is covered. Energy measurement and smart grid technology are discussed. This is a junior level “project” course, and a significant project involving real-world EERE is required.
    Prerequisite(s): EE Junior Standing.
    Six hours of lecture, demonstrations, and lab experiences a week.
  
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    EEN 3430 - Engineering Electromagnetics

    Credits: 4
    Course covers vectors, fields, and mathematical quantities associated with fields. Transmission line theory is covered, with coaxial cable as an application. Electrostatics and Magnetostatics are covered. Faraday’s and Ampere’s laws are covered, along with the full set of Maxwell’s laws. Plane wave radiation concepts are explored, including polarization and power density. Applications and real-world examples are stressed throughout the course.
    Prerequisite(s): PHY 2211 , MTH 2219 , and EEN 3270 .
    Six hours of lecture, demonstrations, and lab experiences a week.
  
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    EEN 4145 - Discrete Time Signals and Systems

    Credits: 4
    An advanced elective that parallels a student’s understanding of continuous time signals and systems with a complete treatment of discrete time signals and systems with applications. This course will introduce the sampling process and develop discrete time signal and system representation and analysis in both time and frequency domains. The Z-Transform will be developed to ease difference equation analysis analogous to the continuous time Laplace transform. Digital Filtering, including both Finite Impulse Response (FIR) and Infinite Impulse Response (IIR) will be used to apply methods.
    Prerequisite(s):  Senior standing
    Four hours of lecture a week.
  
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    EEN 4175 - Digital Architecture and the Hardware Description Language

    Credits: 4
    Advances in silicon technology have enabled System-on-Chip (SOC) designs containing more than ten million gates. Several aspects of engineering need careful attention in highly complex component design projects: Architecture, partitioning and hierarchy; design verification; design-for-reuse. This advanced elective will introduce students to the Verilog Hardware Description Language as we apply common digital architectures to a range of high-level functional design problems. Using lab- and project-based teaching, we will write behavioral descriptions and synthesize hardware in the form of field programmable gate arrays (FPGA).
    Lecture and Lab.
  
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    EEN 4270 - Feedback Circuits

    Credits: 4
    The basic theory of feedback control systems using classical approaches. Feedback problems are formulated and treated from the transfer function, s-plane and frequency response approaches. The role of the system characteristic equation in determining transfer function, transient response and system stability is emphasize by examples of operational amplifier circuits.
    Prerequisite(s): EEN 3220  and EEN 3130 .
    Four hours of lecture a week.
  
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    EEN 4705 - Special Topics in Electrical Engineering

    Credits: 2
    Reading, lectures, study and research on topics of importance in electrical engineering. This course is tailored to the interest of the faculty and students and is offered only on demand.
    Prerequisite(s): consent of the instructor.
    Class and lecture format is variable.
 

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